CRJ - Criminal Justice

CRJ 121 Government Administration

Course Description: This course is designed to familiarize the student with the roles, responsibilities and functions of the public service manager with emphasis on the special challenges and opportunities which the public sector environment poses. Students will learn the theoretical and practical components of planning, organizing, controlling and directing, as they relate to governmental and quasi-governmental organizations.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

CRJ 150 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Course Description: An introduction to the concepts of administration of criminal justice and crime prevention in the United States, involving basic principles of law, constitutional rights, criminal law and the role of the police, courts, corrections, probation, and parole within that system.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

CRJ 150M Introduction to Criminal Justice

Learning Community Course Description: This learning community will introduce you to two exciting fields of applied science. You will have the opportunity to learn about the use of social psychological principles and the workings of the criminal justice system. This is an excellent introduction to two areas of the study of human nature and how real human problems are addressed in both fields.

3 credits

CRJ 161 Criminal Investigation

3 credits

CRJ 240 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Course Description: A study of selected criminal justice systems, organization, theory, and structure in other countries, comparing these to the U.S.A.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CRJ 240 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 242 Crime and Public Policy

Course Description: This course is a comprehensive examination of the causes of crime and its solutions. The first part of the course explores and critiques criminological theories from a variety of perspectives. In the latter part of the course, we study and critique a wide range of public policies designed to prevent and combat crime.

Course Rotation: Fall and Summer.

3 credits

CRJ 243 Alcohol, Drugs and Crime

Course Description: This course is designed to offer insight into society's reliance and dependence on alcohol and legal and illegal drugs. Discussions focus on the economic impact of substance use and abuse, and the history of various criminal justice responses in its "war on drugs." Emphasis will be placed upon the shifting focus for dealing with alcohol and drugs to non criminal justice disciplines.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 243 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 245 Organized Crime

Course Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a definition and examination of organized crime (both traditional and non-traditional groups). Subjects include the types of crimes engaged in by organized groups; its impact upon society; laws designed specifically to control organized crime; and law enforcement techniques used in combating criminal activity.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CRJ 240 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 247 Introduction to Private Security

Course Description: This course provides background of security, how to secure the exterior of a complex from intruders and eliminate theft, and examines the security function in business and industry as it relates to loss prevention. Discussions will also focus on the community policing strategy known as Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED).

3 credits

CRJ 249 Law and Society

Course Descriptions: Law and society refers broadly to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of law which examines law and legal institutions sociologically and through the lenses of various models of jurisprudence and legal reasoning. Now more than ever we must understand the ways in which law invades and impacts all aspects of our lives, examine the social-historical context of important legal decisions, and how political, economic, and social factors influence law. Law is also now the battle ground on which contemporary culture wars are fought, for example, gay marriage and the war on terror's infringement on civil liberties. We will ask how the law on the books compares with the law in action, applying a critical perspective to understand the relations between law and politics, the criminal justice system, the economy, stratification, culture, ideology, legal education, and social change. Topics we will cover include civil rights, the right to privacy, reproductive issues, sexuality, the civil liability explosion, the death penalty.

3 credits

CRJ 250 Community Relations in the Criminal Justice System

Course Description: Students will examine the complexity of human relations as it affects the interactions of the criminal justice system within the communities, including police, prosecution, defense, judges, and probation and parole. Civil rights and liberties, as well as discrimination and prejudice, will be examined as factors in a changing society.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 250 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 251 Penology

Course Description: An analysis of the penology and reform systems and institutions. A survey of theories and practices regarding offenders including the role of probation and parole.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

CRJ 252 Probation and Parole

Course Description: A survey of origins, theories and practice involved in pre-sentence investigation and recommendations concerning convicted offenders. Supervision of non-institutionalized offenders, and pre-release investigation, counseling and supervision of those afforded early release from correctional facilities.

3 credits

CRJ 255 Structure and Function of Police Organization

Course Description: Analysis of the role of police in the criminal justice system and an examination of fundamental principles in organization and administration as they relate to departmental structure of a typical urban police agency.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 255 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 261 Introduction to Criminal Investigation

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Inquiry and Exploration.

Course Description: An introduction to the techniques of investigation, theories of investigation, collection and preservation of evidence, utilization of laboratory analysis of evidence, interviews, admissions, confessions, and searches.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

CRJ 296 Topics in Criminal Justice

Course Description: This course gives the students who have completed introductory courses an opportunity to examine special problems with topics of current interest in the Criminal Justice field, such as victimology, research prospecitives, and ethics in law enforcement.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

CRJ 296A Topic: Crime and Public Policy

Course Description: This course offers an analysis of the nature and definition of crime as a particular form of deviance, types of criminal behavior, and the institutions of the legal system. It focuses on the study of crime and why people commit crimes. To fully appreciate why a person commits a crime requires a multi-disciplinary focus, with an emphasis on social policy implementation.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150

CRJ 296C Topic: Homeland Security Strategies

Course Description: This course is organized around an evolving narrative about what homeland security is/might be. Homeland security is an emerging academic discipline that focuses on a national effort to secure the nation. It requires critical thinking about and working to manage a collection of complex problems. Homeland security problems include intentional (war, terrorism, crime), natural (hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, etc.), and accidental (industrial, transportation and other) events.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150 Min Grade C-

CRJ 296D Topic: Law and Society

3 credits

COM 296E Domestic Violence and Child Abuse

3 credits

CRJ 296H Topic: Controversial Criminal Cases

Prerequisite: None. Fulfills 3 credits in Inquiry and Exploration.

Course Description: This course will explore several controversial criminal cases, such as the JFK assassination and the Michael Jackson case. The objective is to recreate, analyze, and hypothesize, based upon the information available. To be successful at this, students must be objective and review the facts critically.

3 credits

CRJ 296K Topic: Sociology of Violence

Course Description: This course give the students who have completed introductory courses an opportunity to examine special problems with topics of current interest in the Criminal Justice field, such as victimology, research perspectives, and ethics in law enforcement.

3 credits

CRJ 296N Topic: Creative Crime Control

Course Description: There are many roads that can lead to a safer society. This class will explore a wide variety of public policies and programs including crime prevention through environmental design, public health campaigns, civil enforcement, broken windows theory, preventing repeat victimization and focused deterrence.

3 credits

CRJ 296P Topic: Restorative Justice

Course Description: This course will examine the historical development of this social justice movement including its roots in religious and faith communities and the cultures of many first-world peoples. The differences between mainstream criminal justice responses to crime and restorative justice approaches will be examined in depth. Students will also learn about specific restorative justice practices and programs currently in operation in the United States as well as around the world. Finally, students will consider the social, ethical, practical, and economic benefits of adopting restorative justice approaches as well as the drawbacks and challenges of doing so in our society.

3 credits

CRJ 296Q Topic: Crime and Public Policy

Course Description: This course will provide a broad understanding of the development of public policy as it relates to disorder and crime. Included in the discussions will be an overview of theories of crime causation, zero tolerance strategies and its impact on the quality of life for citizens.

3 credits

CRJ 296R Topic: Juvenile Justice

Course Description: This course will analyze all aspects of the juvenile justice system and trace its history. Special attention will be paid to the due process revolution, the merits of diversion and community based alternatives to incarceration, the significance of adolescent developmental differences, and trying juveniles as adults.

3 credits

CRJ 296T Topic: The Criminal Justice System and the Victim

Course Description: This course will examine the role of the victim in the criminal justice system, including their rights and what roles are appropriate for them in our system of justice. It will also address how legislatures and governmental agencies have, or have not addressed the needs of victims.

3 credits

CRJ 296V Topic: The Prisoner as Citizen: Civil Rights Behind Bars

Course Description: The way a country treats its prisoners tells us a lot about that country and their commitment to protecting all citizens' civil rights and basic human rights. Reading will examine the dramatic historical evolution of the legal treatment of prisoner's in the US; how courts have applied the Bill of Rights on different issues central to prison life. Discussions will also focus on the treatment of political prisoners and prisoners around the world.

3 credits

CRJ 296W Image-Making in the Age of Terror: Exploring First and Fourth Amendment Rights

Course Description: This class will explore the use of personal, commercial and governmental images- photographs, digital images, cell phone pictures, videos – from a legalistic perspective. We will examine both the ways in which images can be used to expose human rights violations (i.e. the photos of Abu Ghraib atrocities and war photography) and governmental surveillance of civilian populations. We will debase the justification and effectiveness of the government’s increased use of surveillance as a tactic in the war on terror and crime fighting. At the same time, we will explore how political activists and members of the indie media are increasingly turning their cameras and cell phones on the police at political rallies to protect against and/or document abuses of power. We will contrast the legal limitations placed on individual image makers (e.g. Ordinances requiring special permits for street photographers or people suspected of terrorism for taking pictures of landmarks) with the proliferation of surveillance cameras in both privates and public spaces. Given the widespread use of and increased public tolerance for governmental surveillance, we will also explore the true meaning of privacy in the U.S. and its implications. Finally, we will also explore the ways in which personal forms of image-making – especially through the use of the Internet – represents a democratization of the media and offer the possibility of "speaking truth" to governmental and corporate power.

3 credits

CRJ 298 Contemporary Perspectives on Violence

Course Description: Examines violence from a wide range of theoretical perspectives and the causes, consequences and solutions to various forms of violence.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

CRJ 300 Homeland Security Strategies

Course Description:This course examines the emerging homeland security framework. Homeland security is a way of thinking about and working to manage a collection of volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, problems. The homeland security mission is diverse and transcends jurisdictional and agency boundaries. Homeland security include intentional threats (terrorism, crime), natural threats (hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, storms), and accidental threats (industrial, transportation).
Course Rotation:Fall:Spring;NY:PLV

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150 Minimum Grade of D

CRJ 305 Criminal Law

Course Description: History and development of common and statutory criminal law. Examination of proscribed behavior subject to penal sanctions; capacity, culpability and defenses. Classification of crimes and analysis of specific crimes. Study of constitutional limitations on legislative definition of criminal conduct and on police procedures.

3 credits

CRJ 311 Controversial Criminal Cases

Course Description: This course will explore several controversial criminal cases. The objective is to recreate, analyze, and hypothesize, based upon the information available. To be successful at this, students must be objective and review the facts critically.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 311 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 312 Integrity Issues in the Criminal Justice System

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150 Min Grade D

CRJ 313 Victims of Crime

Course Description: Most crimes involve a victim as well as an offender. This course provides an overview of victimization in America, the experience of victims in the aftermath of crime, and the response to victims by criminal justice and social service agencies. Course materials highlight victims of particular crimes such as domestic violence, stalking, elder abuse, homicide, financial crime, hate crime, and sexual assault. The course emphasizes analysis and discussion of what justice means from a victim’s perspective. It also includes significant active and collaborative learning opportunities, including fieldwork to determine useful ways for incarcerated people to provide indirect restitution to victims of crime.
Course Rotation: NY: Fall

3 credits

CRJ 315 Research Perspectives in Criminal Justice

Course Description: The course will help students to develop an understanding of research methods and will deal with such issues as: how to conduct research, theory development; causation and validity; concepts, operationalization, and measurement; experimental and quasi-experimental designs; data collection and sampling; questionnaire construction; and how to interpret data. Although, it will not be of central focus to this course, statistical strategies such as descriptive and inferential statistics (tests of statistical significance, etc.) will be presented and be essential to an understanding of the research process.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150 Minimum Grade of D

CRJ 321 Creative Crime Control

Course Description:There are many roads that can lead to a safer society. This course explores nontraditional, innovative strategies to reduce crime including preventing repeat victimizations, fixing "broken windows", situational crime prevention, civil enforcement, defensible space, focused deterrence and coerced abstinence. This seminar-style course includes an intensive fieldwork component.

Course Rotation: NY:Fall

3 credits

CRJ 331 Strategies in Corrections Administration

Course Description: The field of corrections has traditionally been characterized by an inward orientation, reflective of the prison community that it serves. This course will examine current strategies that deal with management and administration issues within the context of a more inclusive prison system. Attention will be focused on innovative developments in correctional institutions designed to revitalize the rehabilitative process.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 331 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. ) and (Course : CRJ 251 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 341 Management Science in Criminal Justice

Course Description: Acquaints the student with management techniques, analysis and model building relating to criminal justice operations and management. The course includes, but is not limited to, human and resource management, stress and police personnel, labor management, and legal aspects of police administration.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 255 Minimum Grade of D or CRJ 180 Minimum Grade of D

CRJ 346 Terrorism and Society

Course Description: This course is designed to inform students of the terrorist net- work operating in our society today. This study will include information on who the terrorists are and how they are recruited. The course study will also include some of the psychological impulses that cause them to commit outrages and how they are funded.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 346 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 346A Terrorism and Society

Course Description: This course is designed to inform students of the terrorist net-work operating in our society today. This study will include information on who the terrorists are and how they are recruited. The course study will also include some of the psychological impulses that cause them to commit outrages and how they are funded.

4 credits

CRJ 350 Courts Administration

3 credits

Prerequisites

LAW 305 Min Grade D

CRJ 351 Criminal Evidence and Procedure

Course Description: Comprehensive analysis of rules of evidence, especially as treated under the Criminal Procedure Law of 1970. Subjects include real and circumstantial evidence, burden of proof, hearsay evidence, confessions, admissions, witnesses' identification, etc., as they relate to criminal cases.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 305 Minimum Grade of D

CRJ 375 Criminal Justice System Responses to Domestic Violence and Child Abuse

Course Description: Domestic violence and child abuse have significant impact upon the criminal justice system. Students will develop an understanding of the dynamics of interactions between all elements of a family, both of traditional and nontraditional structures. This course focuses on learning theories and criminal justice strategies used to allay violence between intimates.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CRJ 240 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 391 Internship in Criminal Justice I

Prerequisite: 64 Undergraduate credits. Permission of Advisor required before registration.

Course Description: A supervised placement in a criminal justice agency of at least 120 hours each semester.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

CRJ 392 Internship in Criminal Justice II

Prerequisite: 64 Undergraduate credits. Permission of Advisor required before registration.

Course Description: A supervised placement in a criminal justice agency of at least 120 hours each semester.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

CRJ 395 Independent Study in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: Junior standing and a minimum CQPA of 3.00.

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, the department chairperson, and the academic dean, students may select a topic for guided research that is not included in the regular course offerings. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or paper must also be submitted.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

1 - 9 credits

CRJ 402 Constitutional Issues in Criminal Justice

Course Description: This course is to familiarize the student with the Constitution, especially as it reflects the rights of the individual in the criminal justice system. Students will review both legal precedence and current cases of Constitutional interest.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 402 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 412 Integrity Issues in the Criminal Justice System

Course Description: The focus of this course is to provide the criminal justice student with a better understanding of the complicated integrity issues they will confront in the criminal justice system. The material to be presented begins with a philosophical discussion of morality, ethics, and human behavior. Crucial in assisting the student's future decision making process is that this course will provide a forum in which diverse ideas on concepts such as justice and the "right thing to do" in the context of corruption and other issues such as the use of force will be discussed. Course content will consist of readings related to integrity issues, as well as presentations of moral/ethical dilemmas for discussion and understanding through the use of case studies on corruption and brutality.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

CRJ 601 Introduction to Homeland Security

Course Description: Introduction to Homeland Security is foundational to the remainder of the curriculum in the Master of Arts in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals. This course is designed for people who have been identified as current and future leaders in homeland security. The course provides a basic overview of the ideas that can help leaders think and act more strategically. It also introduces many of the subjects that will be covered in other courses in the master’s program. The course provides students with an overview of the purposes of homeland security and how resources can be managed to engage the risks and opportunities of the homeland security field. Successful completion of this course is required for continuation in the master’s program.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

CRJ 602 Public Sector Management

Course Description: This course is designed to acquaint the student with important management concepts that will impact those in public safety and homeland security. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of readings that have been carefully selected in the areas of organizational theory, behavior, and practice. Upon completion of this course students will understand how using routine management strategies can be applied to all hazards, such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, etc.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 603 Public Sector Strategic Planning and Budgeting

Course Description: This course is designed to acquaint the student with important management concepts that will impact those in public safety and homeland security. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of readings that have been carefully selected in the areas of organizational theory, behavior, and practice. Upon completion of this course students will understand how using routine management strategies can be applied to all hazards, such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, etc.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

CRJ 604 U.S. Constitution and Ethical Issues

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with a hands-on chance to grapple with many complicated constitutional and ethical issues that practitioners will encounter in developing strategies to secure the nation in all situations, such as in routine activities for responding to terrorist’s attacks, natural disasters, etc. The course is structured to give students an opportunity to interact in groups, discuss constitutional case studies, and debate legal/moral/ethical dilemmas that will constantly arise. Special attention will be given to due process concerns.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 605 Public Sector Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation

Course Description: Homeland Security is in its formative period, still being defined and bound as a domain, a discipline, and an academic field of study. This process of development is accomplished through national dialogue to determine what the issues are, what works, and what does not work. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the interconnectedness off policy analysis and program planning.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 605 ( Course : CRJ 601 . Minimum Grade of B. )

CRJ 621 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

3 credits

CRJ 622 International Human Rights

Course Description: In developing strategies to secure this country, it is important our role in a global community and, in this context, to understand the reality of international human rights. First agreed upon by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1948, member nations agreed to "strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction." Upon completion of this course, students will understand their commitment to the need for recognition of international human rights.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 624 Technology and Critical Infrastructure Protection

Course Description: Critical Infrastructure protection is one of the cornerstones of homeland security. At least nine sectors have been identified as part of CIP: Water, Power & Energy, Information & Telecommunications, Chemical Industry, Transportation, Banking & Finance, Defense Industry, Postal & Shipping, Agriculture & Food, Public Health, and Emergency Services. Additionally, the terrorist attacks in Mumbai revealed how terrorist made effective use of technology to plan and carry out their attacks. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to assess the value of existing and new technologies, of various risk tools, and how to apply those tools to any critical infrastructure within their multi-jurisdictional region, and derive optimal strategies and draft policies to reduce the risk associated with future terrorist attacks and disasters.
Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 625 Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Homeland Security

Course Description: If the nation is really engaged in developing strategies to secure the nation, it is necessary to go beyond what the government "can do for you." Students will focus on what are the differences between homeland security and homeland defense as it applies to the interaction of the various disciplines engaged in the effort, such as law enforcement, the medical community, emergency managers, fire departments and the private sectors. While they are not working against each other in a traditional sense, the must recognize the joint roles they play in contributing to the effort within the rule of law, if the country is to be successful in securing the nation. This course outlines the working relationship the law must have with the various disciplines in the homeland security community and why these relationships are vital to the nation’s strategies to deal with all hazards.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 626 Special Topics in Homeland Security

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide participants with insight into the structural, conceptual and intellectual underpinnings, and implications of the emerging discipline of homeland security. Looking at a wide range of topics and problems, the course will seek to stimulate a comprehensive discussion of how homeland security professionals and the general public can leverage strategies and resources to address an all hazards approach. Topics will vary each semester. Two tentative topics are: Religions of the Globe and a Community Response to Pandemics.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 627 Psychology and Terrorism/Fear

Course Description: One could argue that a "common sense" first appraisal of terrorists is that they are crazy and evil. Why else would people kill innocent people who mean them no harm and even kill themselves in the process? Relying on this common sense, President Bush branded the 9/11 hijackers as evil cowards. Others have argued that those who would commit suicide in their assaults on the free world are not rational and are not deterred by rational concepts. This course examines terrorists to find out who they are and what motivates them. In a related context, the Russian novelist, Fyodor Dostoyevsky said, "While nothing is easier than to denounce an evildoer, nothing is more difficult than to understand him."
Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 628 Research Colloquium and Capstone Seminar

Course Description: The primary goal of this course is to develop critical thinking skills necessary for students to (1) evaluate primary, empirical research in psychology, (2) translate theoretical ideas into testable research hypotheses, (3) test these hypotheses by means of a logically developed statistical plan. Material to be covered includes scientific methodology and major statistical techniques used in analyzing behavioral data (i.e., correlation/regression analyses, contrast models, analysis of variance, non-parametric procedures).

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 601 Minimum Grade of B

CRJ 629 Comparative Governments

Course Description: As the United States works to prevent and prepare for terrorist attacks, pandemics and other natural disasters, learning from the approaches of other countries offers insight for strategies that can guide the development of the discipline of homeland security. A comparative assessment of strategies utilized in other countries can serve as a vital tool in effective policymaking and in avoiding the inefficient and often dangerous, process of "reinventing the wheel" with respect to homeland security. The assessment requires an understanding of the framework, approaches restrictions, and powers under which other countries operate, as well as an understanding of the international dimension of an all hazard threats.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

CRJ 630 Intelligence Gathering Strategies for Homeland Security

Course Description: The 9/11 terrorist attacks and the ensuing war on terror have focused the nation’s attention on strategies needed to secure this country. This course examines key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense. Students will have the opportunity to fully address policy, organizational, and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support. Course reference materials will provide an overview of diverse intelligence disciplines and how the intelligence community operates. Course emphasis will be on issues affecting policy, oversight, and intelligence support to homeland defense/security and national decision-making.

Course Rotation: Fall: PLV

3 credits