PSY - Psychology

PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology I

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: An introduction to the science and profession of psychology, including coverage of human development, personality theory and research, social psychology, motivation, perception, and related topics. (Students may have the opportunity to participate in Psychology Department research projects.)

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

PSY 110P Introduction to Psychology I

Course Description Learning Community: This Learning Community will introduce students to a holistic wellness approach to health. The HW course component will identify major health problems in the United States. Students will have the opportunity to have a computerized fitness evaluation test done and objectives to improve or maintain their fitness condition. The teaching strategy is designed to provide an active learning situation for the student. The PSY course component will serve as an introduction to the science and profession of psychology, including coverage of human development, personality, social psychology, motivation, perception, and related topics. (Students may have the opportunity to participate in Psychology Department research projects)

3 credits

Corequisites

HW 101P

PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology II

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: An introduction to the science and profession of psychology including coverage of research, human development, personality, testing and assessment, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychopathology, health and wellness, social cognition, and social influence.

Note: This 3-credit course is open to students at Beth Israel Hospital only.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

PSY 111C Intro to Psychology II (CAP)

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

3 credits

PSY 111M Introduction to Psychology - Learning Community

Course Description: This course will examine the most influential ideas regarding what it means to be human that have emerged from the traditions of religion, psychology, and philosophy.

3 credits

Corequisites

PHI 110M

PSY 112 Introduction to Psychology

Course Description: This course introduces the student to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Modern psychology is broad in scope and rich in detail. The topics in this course have been chosen to provide a representative sample of important areas of active interest in psychology today. Topics include: introduction and research methods, neurosciences and biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning, memory, life span development, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social psychology.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Fall and Spring.

4 credits

PSY 112C Introduction to Psychology (CAP)

Course Description: This course introduces the student to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Modern psychology is broad in scope and rich in detail. The topics in this course have been chosen to provide a representative sample of important areas of active interest in psychology today. Topics include: introduction and research methods, neurosciences and biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning, memory, life span development, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social psychology.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Fall and Spring.

4 credits

PSY 196 Topics in Psychology

3 - 4 credits

PSY 111CH Introduction to Psychology II (CAP) - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This Learning Community will integrate the study of Psychology with critical reading and writing. Analysis of texts representing current issues in the field will serve as a stimulus for discussion, research and enhancement of academic writing skills.

3 credits

Corequisites

ENG 105CH, ENG 110CH

PSY 111CV Intro. to Psychlgy II (CAP) - Wonderwomen & Supermen:Sex, Gndr, Health & Behavior Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.
Course Description: Health and behavior are complex and familiar parts of human experience. There are many differences, and many similarities, in men's and women's health behavior. In this learning community we will examine basic principles of psychology with a focus on the role that being male or female has in has in health behaviors such as in diet, exercise, social relationships and staying healthy.

3 credits

Corequisites

ENG 105CV, ENG 110CV

PSY 201 Psychology of Business and Industry

Course Description: The psychological principles and techniques involved in the management of personnel in business and industry. The topics included are hiring techniques, job analysis, training performance appraisal, communications, fatigue, safety, morale and industrial leadership.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall.

3 - 4 credits

PSY 202 Psychology of Violence

Course Descripion:This course examines the psychology of violence from a global and public health and public policy perspective. Online discussions, lectures/outlines, power points, film, web-based materials, and readings address interpersonal, self-directed, and collective acts of violence that threaten human psychological/physical health and wellbeing. Global and public perspectives emphasize the scope of the problem, the physical and psychosocial impact of violence, and prevention/intervention efforts. Public policy issues relate to the translation, dissemination, and diffusion of research innovation.
Course Rotation:NY;PLV

3 credits

PSY 203 Psychology of Expressive Therapies: Healing Through Art, Music, Drama, Poetry and Dance

Course Description:This is an introductory course on the history, theory, and practice of expressive art therapies. Students will be introduced to art, music, dance, and drama therapies, through lecture/discussion, and firsthand experience. Students will be required to dance, sing, make art, make drama, and write poetry even though you may not consider yourself an artist, as singer, a dancer, musician, or poet. You will learn though your experiences of the creative arts therapy forms. Students will explore and work with a variety of materials and media and present their creative work to the class.
Course Description:NY:PLV;Fall

3 credits

PSY 205 Statistics in Psychology and Allied Fields

Course Description: An introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to psychological and educational research. Topics included are measures of central tendency and variability, standard scores, elementary probability theory, small sample theory, linear regression and correlation, non-parametric techniques, and introduction to analysis of variance and factor analysis.

Course Rotation: Spring.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 206 Psychology and Law

Course Description:This course will examine the application of social science research methods and psychological knowledge to contemporary issues within our legal system. Course topics and discussion will include: the structure of the US legal system, the psychology of crime, investigation and evaluation of criminal suspects, court procedures and trial process, forensic assessment, jury selection and decision making, and the psychology of victims and theories of punishment. The course will focus on the intersection between psychology and law, as well as explore important cases involving the influence of psychology within the legal system.

Course Rotation: Fall:Spring;NY:PLV

3 credits

PSY 209 Health Psychology

Course Description: Health psychology demonstrates the role of psychology as a hub science. That is, psychological research and theory influence core disciplines such as medicines, mathematics and the social sciences. The impact of psychology in the health sciences is especially striking. Public health models, the study of disease, pain, stress, coping, and well-being draw extensively on psychology and psychologists. The course summarizes relevant findings in terms of treatments, health care systems, health care policy and advocacy.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Spring and Summer.

3 credits

PSY 215 Psychology of Cultural Diversity

Course Description: This course will give students an overview of the many issues involved in multicultural psychology. Students are required to critique, analyze, and integrate diversity issues raised in the text, class discussions, presentations, and real world to gain understanding of contemporary social issues from the psychological perspective of cultural diversity.

Course Rotation: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 225 Parapsychology and the Occult

Course Description: The course covers a diverse selection of occult, paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs. These include, but are not limited to: ESP and parapsychology; ghosts, near-death experiences and demonic possession; UFOs and alien abductions; astrology and ancient astronauts; The Bermuda Triangle; pseudopsychologies and psychoanalysis; faith healing; alternative medicine and health quackery; environmental pseudoscience and mass hysteria; Loch Ness Monster and cryptozoology. The course examines the evidence for the reality of these various phenomena as well as the psychology of belief.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

PSY 227 Psychology of Women

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits toward Women's and Gender Studies Major/Minor.

Course Description: The course investigates the psychological characteristics of women and possible psychological differences between the sexes attributable to biological and/or cultural factors. Current relevant movements are examined in the light of the psychological principles deduced.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 230 Personality and Social Psychology: Readings at the Leading Edge

Course Description:This course will examine the most recent important empirical research in personality and social psychology. In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about the aspects of life that are not pathological but are part of everyday human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of the most recent personality and social psychology; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings in specific areas including happiness, loneliness, social psychological contagion, self-determination, and others; (3) examining how these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

Course Rotation:Fall:PLV

3 credits

PSY 231 Psychology of Death and Dying

Prerequisite applies to NYC Campus only.

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course provides an opportunity to explore the significance of the subject of death and dying in one's life and how the beliefs and feelings related to death and dying influence one's life and living. Students are introduced to the extensive theoretical and research literature in the area of the psychology of death and dying.

3 credits

PSY 232 Group Relations and Interviewing Techniques

Course Description: The focus of this course is to develop basic skills essential for effective group process and interviewing. Some areas covered are: communication skills, the interview as an interaction, dynamics of the interaction process, group roles, leadership styles, problem solving, decision making and conflict resolution. The process is an experiential one in which a variety of appropriate group/interview exercises and techniques are utilized.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Summer.

3 credits

PSY 233 Psychology of Civic Engagement

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I; Service Learning Component.

Course Description: This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service setting. A strong emphasis on civic engagement will be featured.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall, Spring, Summer.

3 credits

PSY 234 Human Sexual Behavior

Fulfills 3 credits toward Women's and Gender Studies Major/Minor.

Course Description: This course examines components of human sexual behavior including anthropological, sociological and psychological aspects. Taboos, rituals and rites of primitive and modern cultures are explored to provide a framework for current attitudes and practices.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

PSY 235 Community Psychology

Course Description: Community Psychology studies action-oriented movements in psychology that deal with problems in the community. The purpose of this course is to describe and critique the basic concepts that underlie a community psychology perspective, to study the historical factors that led to the development of these concepts, and to understand the impact on the community of the interrelated personal, social, and community factors. Topics include social change, action programs, prevention, and ecology in order to examine how the community environment could be enhanced as a context for change and growth. Integration of the discipline's values, theories, and methods is stressed.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 240 Positive Psychology and Happiness

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course will be devoted to a particular domain of research and clinical application, known as "positive psychology." In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; (3) moving beyond what makes us happy and studying other aspects of the "good life," such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and (4) examining whether these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 241 Psychology of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse

Course Description: This course will examine the etiology of alcoholism and other substance abuse from a psychological perspective. The psychological, learning, and social psychological bases for these substance abuses and their implications for treatment and recovery by the addicted individual are covered.

Course Rotation: NYC: Summer. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 242 Under the Radar: Seldom Talked About Addictions

Course Description: In this class we will discuss several different addictions, how they affect individuals, and people who love them. We will talk about Co-dependency and Co-addiction and why people choose to be with addicted individuals.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring and Summer.

3 credits

PSY 243 Applied Social Psychology

Course Description: This course in an introduction to the social psychology as it is applied to a broad range of fields. Students will explore the array of applications of social psychology to a number of areas that can lead to career paths of their choice. Topics include: educational, business, consumer, health & wellness, sports, criminal justice & law, environmental , media psychologies, and diversity issues.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 256 Psychology of Personal Adjustment

Course Description: An experiential and cognitive study of personal adjustment. Students participate in a series of exercises and group discussions designed to help the student better understand his or her own adjustment to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

PSY 256Q Psychology of Adjustment

Learning Community Course Description: This Learning Community will introduce students to a variety of holistic approaches to adjustment and health. The psychology course component will emphasize experiential and lecture study of personal adjustment. Students will participate in a series of exercises and group discussions designed to help them understand their own adjustments to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning. The HW course component will emphasize the practice of postures, movements, deep breathing, meditation and visualization for complete mental and physical relaxation. Emphasis will be on practice of these techniques.

3 credits

Corequisites

HW 105Q

PSY 256Y Psychology of Personal Adjustment (Online - Nactel)

New Core: Fulfills 4 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the A.S. Degree of the Nactel program. Students must be working towards an A.S. or B.S. degree in Telecommunications.

Course Description: This course presents an experimental and cognitive study of personal adjustment. Students participate in a series of group discussions designed to help the student better understand his or her own adjustment to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning.

4 credits

PSY 257 Sports Psychology

Course Description: Performance psychology extends the principles and concepts of sports psychology beyond the athletic arena. The course will focus as motivation, cognition, stress management, and group dynamics. Techniques and exercises that will be demonstrated and experiences in classes include: goal setting, guided imagery, thought control, relaxation, leadership and interpersonal relations. It has been scientifically established that these skills can be utilized in a variety of situations (career, academics) where optimum performance is desired.

3 - 4 credits

PSY 258 Forensic Psychology

Course Description: Within the field of Psychology, Forensic Psychology has become an important focus of the criminal justice system, clinical practice of psychology as well as scientific research. Forensic Psychology deals with the application of psychological knowledge or methods to tasks faced by the legal system. Some tasks include: criminal, investigation, assessing defendant for insanity or competency, assessing people for risk of violence, sexual offense or other dangerous behaviors, trial consultation, child-custody evaluations, etc. in conclusions, it is the endeavor that examines aspects of human behavior directly related to the legal process and the professional practice of Psychology within a legal system that embraces both criminal and civil law and their interactions.

Course Rotation: PLV:Spring

3 credits

PSY 260 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

Course Description: One important goal of higher education is to develop one's critical thinking and problem solving abilities. This course is designed to achieve two major goals, one academic, and the other, practical. The academic goal is to explore the psychology of human thinking and problem solving, whereas the practical goal is to help you understand the processes and styles of you own thinking, enhance your critical thinking abilities, and practice your problem solving skills needed for career and academic success. To fulfill the academic goal, the course introduces exciting research and theories in cognitive psychology related with critical thinking and problem solving, such as memory, emotion, language, reasoning, decision-making, creativity, thinking styles, as well as individual differences in various kinds of human intelligence. To accomplish the practical goal, this course brings you opportunities to examine your own thinking processes, organize and challenge your own mind, and practice your critiquing and evaluating skills to others.

4 credits

PSY 271 Psychology of Morality

Course Description:What makes people good or bad? How do we develop a sense of right or wrong? When should people be responsible for their actions? These are but three of the many important questions being investigated in a field known as moral psychology. Researchers in moral psychology address timeless philosophical questions by examining the biological, social, and psychological nature of why and how we become moral agents. In order to understand what underlies morality today, we must first understand its evolutionary history and biological underpinnings. (As a species how did we develop morality? What brain processes underline morality?). From the biological we move to the developmental (Do babies understand morality? Is morality learned? How does morality develop over time?) To fully understand morality, we must then understand the social and psychological processes that help us make decisions about what is good and what is bad. (Why do we "feel" that certain things are right and certain things are wrong? How do we come to a make a decision about what is good and what is bad?) Finally, using what we have learned, we will investigate the issue of individual differences and circumstances related to moral behavior, and then consider how our knowledge might be applied –for better (hopefully) or worse-in the near future.

Course Rotation:NY:PLV;Spring

3 credits

PSY 275 Lifespan Development Psychology

Course Description: This course provides a comprehensive and critical review of life span developmental psychology - the science of individual development. The course will include a survey of the basic concepts and principles of physical, cognitive, social, emotional and personality development at each major stage of life including infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. The focus of the course is to trace developmental change across the entire life span from the point of view of different theories, issues and empirical findings.

Course Rotation: NYC: Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 111 Min Grade D

PSY 276 The Psychology of Intimate Relation

Course Description: This course will examine the most recent empirical research in the field of personal relationships. In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about an aspect of life that is very important part of everyday human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of the most recent psychology findings in the field; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings in specific areas including marriage, happiness, and fulfillment in relationships; (3) examining how these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

Course Rotation: Fall;NYC:PLV

3 credits

PSY 277 Evolutionary Psychology

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines how important aspects of human thinking, emotion, and behavior have been shaped by our long biological evolution through the processes of natural selection and sexual selection. Its focus is to identify and explain what factors are universal in human psychological functioning and their community with non-human species. Topics covered in this course include: explanations of human evolution, intelligence, thinking and problem solving in regard to social relations, mate selection, evolutionary explanations of psychological disorders such as phobia and depression, gender differences, parenting, aggression, cooperation, dominance and territoriality.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 278 Environmental Psychology

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines interactions between people and the physical environment. Characteristics of physical environments have a powerful effect on human perceptions, emotions, attributions, and behavior. The major focus of the course is on environments designed and constructed by people (the "built" environment), not natural environments. Topics covered in this course include personal space, crowding, territoriality, wayfinding, good and bad environmental design and privacy.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 291R Topic: Health Psychology

Course Description: Health Psychology presents research and evidence based practice from psychological science. Lifestyle, personality, mental health, biological processes and predispositions, as well as cognitive, emotional, and behavioral dimensions of health and well-being are considered from a public health perspective. The course integrates psychological findings related to prevention and intervention that reveal the many advances in understanding issues such as placebo effects, stress, expectations, beliefs, and social support in promoting health and healing.

3 credits

PSY 296 Topic in Psychology

3 credits

PSY 296A Topic: Psychology of Ethnic Groups in the United States of America: The Latino Experience

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: The course will present a general overview of issues relevant for the application of psychological theory, research, and practice to Latinos as ethnic groups. This is the fastest growing minority group in the United States of America and represents diverse countries of origin. Particular attention will be given to applying psychological theories and constructs in the analysis of the experience of being Latino in the United States of America. Topics covered will include Latino culture, family patterns, immigration and acculturation, as well as poverty, prejudice, race and racism.

3 credits

PSY 296B Topic: Psychology of Peace and Conflict Resolution

Course Description: Division 48 of the American Psychological Association, the Peace Psychology Division, works to promote peace in the world at large and within nations, communities and families, through research, education and training on issues concerning peace, nonviolent conflict resolution and reconciliation, and the causes and prevention of destructive conflict. Its journal, Peace and Conflict: the Journal of Peace Psychology, is published quarterly, and reflects the growing interest in this area of focus within the field of psychology. This course will devote itself to these same issues, focusing on the causes and prevention of violence, training in methods of non-violent resolution of conflict, and the practices of violence, training in methods of non-violent resolution of conflict, and the practices and institutions that promote peacemaking and peaceful development of families and nations.

3 credits

PSY 296C Topic in Psychology: Introduction to Peace Studies

4 credits

PSY 296E Topic: Psychology of Acting and Public Self-Presentation

Course Description: This course will introduce you to the basics of public self-presentation as these are related to psychology and counseling. These include theory, instrument, and craft work. The course will incorporate the study of several techniques of acting in both didactic and experimental formats. The skills of listening, relating and responding and use of the emotional life will be discussed, demonstrated and related to the skills of helping people.

3 credits

PSY 296F Topic: Personality and Leadership

Course Description This course will introduce you to the field of leadership as it is manifested in such settings as business and other organizational settings. Personality factors involved in leadership behaviors will be emphasized as they are applied in various settings.

3 credits

PSY 296G Topics: Under the Radar- Seldom-Talked-About Addictions

Course Description Topics include several different addictions and how these affect individuals' cognitive, affective and behavioral functioning. The intrapersonal impacts on the people who love such addicted persons will be emphasized. The seldom-talked about-addictions to be covered include: gambling, self mutilation, sex and food.

3 credits

PSY 296H Topic in Psychology: Psychology and The Movies

Course Description: This course covers various topics in psychology, including existential theory, transference, psychopathology, adolescent, ethical, and diversity issues. Students are expected to read assigned articles or book chapters and discuss these issues and how they relate to the dynamics and characters in popular mainstream films that we view together as a class.

3 - 4 credits

PSY 296J Topic: Pseudoscience and Critical Thinking in Psychology and Other Fields

Course Description: This course examines the distinctions between scientific psychology and pseudoscience in the popular culture. This examination will be done from the perspectives of social psychology (belief systems and persuasion); cognitive psychology (superstition magical thinking), and critical thinking in scientific psychology.

3 credits

PSY 296P Special Topics in Psychology: Performance Psychology

Course Description: Performance psychology extends the principles and concepts of sports psychology beyond the athletic arena. The course will focus on issues such as motivation, cognition, stress management, and group dynamics. Techniques and exercises that will be demonstrated and experienced in classes include: goal setting, guided imagery, thought control, relaxation, leadership, and interpersonal relations. It has been scientifically established that these skills can be utilized in a variety of situations (career, academics) where optimum performance is desired.

3 credits

PSY 296R Topic: Psychology of Civic Engagement

Prerequisite: none. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I; Service Learning Component.

Course Description: This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service setting. A strong emphasis on civic engagement will be featured.

3 credits

PSY 296Y Topic: Positive Psychology and Happiness

Course Description: This course focuses on what psychologists have learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. Topics addressed include: identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; examining theoretical perspectives and empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; aspects of the "good life" such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and the application of these theories and findings to everyday life.

3 credits

PSY 296Z Topic: Children and Youth - A Global Perspective

Course Description: This course explores the life experiences of children and youth from a global perspective and examines the impact of their life experiences on their psychosocial development. It explores a number of global trends in child and youth development and highlights continued obstacles in a number of key areas, including: Child protection and child rights, development in high risk settings, the impact of globalization, child trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation, child soldiers and children in armed conflict, child labor, discrimination and violence against children and youth (including gender-based violence), and HIV/AIDS and other health-related issues (e.g., female genital mutilation).

3 credits

PSY 297 Principles of Psychology As Depicted in Cinema

Course Description: This course covers various topics in psychology, including existential theory, transference, psychopathology, adolescent, ethical, and diversity issues. Students are expected to read assigned articles or book chapters and discuss these issues and how they relate to the dynamics and characters in popular mainstream films that students view during the online portion of the class.

Course Rotation: NY and PL

3 - 4 credits

PSY 296DM Topics in Psychology: Applied Social Psychology

Learning Community Course Description: This learning community will introduce you to two exciting fields of applied science. You will have the opportunity to learn about the use of social psychological principles and the workings of the criminal justice system. This is an excellent introduction to two areas of the study of human nature and how real human problems are addressed in both fields.

3 credits

Corequisites

CRJ 150M

PSY 302 Child Psychology

Course Description: A study of the psychology of the developing child from birth through adolescence. At each developmental stage the child will be considered from physical, cognitive and psychosocial perspectives, and from diverse theoretical viewpoints.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

PSY 303 Adolescent Psychology

Course Description: A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the individual from puberty to maturity plus an examination of the problems of adolescence as viewed by the adolescent, the parent, the psychologist, and the teacher.

Course Rotation: PLV: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 304 Social Psychology

Course Description: A presentation of the theories and empirical research on the characteristics of group behavior, factors influencing it, and the individual's reaction to social stimuli. Topics included are group structure, group dynamics, values, attitudes, public opinion research, communication, propaganda, prejudice, roles, and leadership.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

4 credits

PSY 306 Psychological Testing

Course Description: Introduction to test and measurement theory. Discussion of the criteria to be used in the selection of psychological tests as well as theoretical conceptions of reliability, validity and operations for estimating from empirical data different kinds of reliability and validity. Frequently used tests of personality, aptitudes and achievement are considered.

Course Rotation: Fall.

4 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-Req of Psy 110 and Psy 111 ( Course : PSY 110 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 110P . ) or (Course : PSY 105 . Required Courses: 1. ) and (Course : PSY 104 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111C . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111CH . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111CV . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111M . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSYA 111C . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSYM 111 . Required Courses: 1. )

PSY 307 Psychology of Personality

Course Description: An introduction to the scientific study of personality development with emphasis on the normal. Examines the nature of personality theory, methods of assessment and research, and the major theories representative of the following orientations: type-trait, psychodynamic, phenomenological, cognitive, and learning.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D) or PSY 112 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 308 History of Psychology

Advanced required course for Psychology majors.

Course Description: This course traces the development of psychology from its philosophical roots to the present. The competition of ideas among the major systems of psychology provides a basis for a critical evaluation of psychology in the 21st Century.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 311 Biological Psychology

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Inquiry and Exploration.

Course Description: A study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior. The course covers the physiological background of the organism, sensory and motor functions, and physiological factors at work in motivation, learning, memory, and psychological disorders.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring. PLV: Fall.

4 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D) or PSY 112 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 311P Physiological Psychology

Learning Community Course Description: This Learning Community provides a balance of biological and behavioral aspects of human sexuality using a multidisciplinary approach. Anatomical and physiological correlates, STDs and the human immune defense system, and pregnancy/conception/developmental issues will be highlighted. Goals of the Learning Community include familiarizing students with major findings and theoretical perspectives, and to understand how these ideas can be applied in order to understand a variety of social situations.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 104 and PSY 105 or PSY 110 and PSY 111

Corequisites

BIO 115P

PSY 313 Research Methodology

Course Description: A survey course designed to introduce basic strategies in psychological research. It aims to acquaint the student with library skills, research instruments, methods, and designs with their statistical correlates.

Course Rotation: Spring.

4 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D) or PSY 112 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 314 Psychology of Creative Thinking

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course will examine various theories of creativity, conscious versus unconscious aspects of creative thinking, methods for studying creativity, and the development of thinking in several individuals generally recognized as highly creative thinkers, including Darwin, Picasso, and Einstein. Special topics such as child prodigies and "idiot savants" will also be considered.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 104 Minimum Grade of D or PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 315 Cognitive Psychology

Course Description: The course is an introduction to human cognitive processes and the key concepts and findings in cognitive psychology. The relevance of cognitive processes to everyday experiences; effective learning strategies; and applications to other disciplines, such as education, communication and speech, law, clinical, and consumer psychology are covered. This course is based on assumptions that are supported by research.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring.

4 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-Requisite of PSY 111 ( Course : PSY 111 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 104 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSYM 111 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSYA 111C . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111C . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111CH . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111CV . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111M . Minimum Grade of D. )

PSY 317 Problem Solving and Critical Thinking in Psychology

3 credits

PSY 320 Abnormal Psychology I

Course Description: A survey of origins, treatment, and descriptive characteristics of abnormal behavior with emphasis upon current research data and theories about the causes of psychopathology.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-Requisite of PSY 111 ( Course : PSY 111 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 104 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSYM 111 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSYA 111C . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111C . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111CH . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111CV . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111M . Minimum Grade of D. )

PSY 321 Abnormal Psychology II

Course Description: A survey of the organic syndromes and the personality disorders, with particular attention to the deviations peculiar to our time such as manifestations of the drug sub-culture. Emphasis will be given to recent research findings.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Spring - Even years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-Requisite of PSY 111 ( Course : PSY 111 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 104 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSYM 111 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSYA 111C . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111C . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111CH . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111CV . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : PSY 111M . Minimum Grade of D. )

PSY 323 Psychology of Learning

Course Description: A survey course that addresses traditional and contemporary theories of conditioning, and cognitive/human information processing theories of learning.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-Req of Psy 110 and Psy 111 ( Course : PSY 110 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 110P . ) or (Course : PSY 105 . Required Courses: 1. ) and (Course : PSY 104 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111C . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111CH . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111CV . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSY 111M . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSYA 111C . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : PSYM 111 . Required Courses: 1. )

PSY 323Y Psychology of Learning

4 credits

PSY 332 Group Relations and Interviewing Techniques

Course Description: This course covers general principles of effective interviewing. It provides students with the skills and the techniques for achieving various interview goals, with an emphasis on counseling interviews. The establishment of helping relationships in group settings is highlighted throughout.
Course Rotation:NY:PLV;Fall:Spring

4 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D) or PSY 112 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 337 Introduction to Psychological Counseling

Course Description: Techniques and procedures are covered to develop skills applicable to a variety of settings. An experimental approach is used to prepare students to conduct interviews and counsel in personnel placement, hospital intake, educational advisement and other settings.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D) or PSY 112 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 375 Lifespan Development Psychology

Course Description:The development of the individual is an exciting process, beginning with the rapid metamorphoses of cells at the conception and continuing through intricate changes of growth and aging. The study of development is also intriguing because each of us, and everyone we care about, is constantly developing. This course therefore embraces both scientific discoveries and personal insights. It is important to remember that each of us analyzing the developing individual is only human, and thus our interpretation of behavior and change is filtered through our own biases. So that you may identify biases where they occur, we will spend time becoming familiar with the major theories of human development and the terms these theories use, paying special attention to the research that supports or contradicts each perspective. Critical thinking, as well as mastery of the material, is a goal of this course. Probably no other field of study abounds with more free advice than child rearing, yet much of this advice has been handed out in ignorance of the available experimental data and/or established techniques for objective testing. We will work to develop skills for evaluating the views and advice you will continue to hear long after you close your books.

Course Rotation: NYC:PLV;FALL

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 112 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 380 Experimental Psychology I

Course Description: The year-long course sequence prepares students to critically evaluate empirical research in psychology and to design, conduct, and present original research projects. Course topics cover literature reviews, development of testable hypotheses, research design concepts, statistical procedures relevant to behavioral research, data collection techniques, interpretation and evaluation of research findings, and ethical issues in research. The research topics may be in diverse areas such as learning, cognitive processes, and social and organizational behavior. The original research proposals are developed in PSY 380; the original research projects are conducted and presented in PSY 381. Written scientific reports and the opportunity to present the original research at the Pace University Annual Undergraduate Psychology Conference culminate the course sequence.

Course Rotation: Fall.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 205 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 381 Experimental Psychology II

Course Description: The year-long course sequence prepares students to critically evaluate empirical research in psychology and to design, conduct, and present original research projects. Course topics cover literature reviews, development of testable hypotheses, research design concepts, statistical procedures relevant to behavioral research, data collection techniques, interpretation and evaluation of research findings, and ethical issues in research. The research topics may be in diverse areas such as learning, cognitive processes, and social and organizational behavior. The original research proposals are developed in PSY 380; the original research projects are conducted and presented in PSY 381. Written scientific reports and the opportunity to present the original research at the Pace University Annual Undergraduate Psychology Conference culminate the course sequence.

Course Rotation: Spring.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 380 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 390 Honors Project in Psychology

3 - 6 credits

PSY 391 Practicum in Psychology I

Students must fulfill the required prerequisites and request permission from the Instructor.

Course Description: A field training experience involving a minimum of 120 supervised hours in an accredited agency. Evaluations are made of student performance by supervising personnel of the agency and by faculty supervisors. Students must contact the fieldwork coordinator prior to the semester of actual placement.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 232 Minimum Grade of D or PSY 337 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 392 Practicum in Psychology II

Permission of the Instructor is required.

Course Description: In the weekly seminar and 120 additional supervised hours in an accredited agency, the student continues the process begun in PSY 391 in expanding helping skills and understanding of the field.


Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 250 Minimum Grade of D or PSY 391 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 393 Internship in Psychology

Course Description: An internship is an assignment, paid or volunteer, in settings such as human service agencies, businesses, industries or organizations that is intended to provide students with opportunities to apply their knowledge of psychological principals and empirical research. The intern’s duties and responsibilities will be tailored to the needs of the sponsoring organization and the background of the student. The internship site must be approved by the psychology department in advance of the work experience. Internships are either full-time or part-time and generally last for one semester. The internship may be taken once (one semester)Course Rotation:NY:PLV;Fall:Spring

1 - 4 credits

PSY 395 Independent Study in Psychology

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, the department chairperson, and the academic dean, students may select a topic for guided research that is not included in the regular course offerings. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or paper must also be submitted.

Course Rotation: TBA.

1 - 9 credits

PSY 395A Independent Study in Psychology (A)

1 - 9 credits

PSY 396 Special Topics in Psychology

Course Description: In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics in depth. Organizational behavior, techniques of counseling, community psychology, and sexual deviance are examples. May be taken more than once for credit.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 396A Topic: Psychology of Leadership, Supervising, Motivating

Course Description:
It has long been realized that people don’t quit jobs, they quit Bosses. People will not follow a bad manager, supervisor or leader under most conditions other than coercion.The basic premise of this course is that it is the personality of an individual and his ability to inspire trust and credibility that makes the difference in the performance of organizations (teams, groups). No matter what the system of management is or the system of governance, it is the nature and strength of the leader that makes all the difference, in what people will do to accomplish mutual goals. All Presidents of the United States operate under a free Democracy. But, is it the same government under an Obama, Bush, Clinton, Johnson or Nixon? While there are similarities attributable to the system and the times, there are also major differences which are a function of the personality of the Leader. Indeed, we often pick partners and professors on the basis of likeability, trustworthiness and credibility as opposed only to objective qualifications.

3 credits

PSY 396H Topic: Psychopathology Goes to Movies

Course Description: The intended purpose of this course is to teach through Films, how the various psychopathologies might play themselves out in an approximation of real-life, real world situations of which these films are a simulacrum. John Milton, in Paradise Lost tells us that we must "strike the visual nerve, for we have much to see". So, too, in this course there is much to learn by seeing with the mind’s eye through well-chosen films the Psychopathology set forth in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association.

3 credits

PSY 396I Topic: Relationship Skills for Partners and Parents

Course Description: This course will help you identify and develop the interpersonal skills necessary for successful, happy relationships. In particular, the course will focus on dating/marriage and parenting. You will learn how to build and maintain healthy relationships. Interpersonal communication skills to improve your ability to listen, express feelings, encourage, give and receive feedback, state needs, and resolve conflicts will be taught and practiced. The class will use didactic presentations, source readings, group interaction, popular movies, and, role-plays. Typical conflicts that arise in relationships and parenting will be addressed with practical, realistic approaches to problem solving.

3 credits

PSY 396J Topic: Environmental Psychology

Course Description: In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics indepth. Organizational behavior, techniques of counseling, community psychology, and sexual deviance are examples. May be taken more than once for credit.

3 credits

PSY 396N Topics in Psychology: Forensic Psychology

Course Description: Forensic psychology deals with the application of psychological knowledge or methods to tasks faced by the legal system. Some tasks include: criminal investigation, assessing defendant for insanity or competency, assessing people for risk of violence, sexual offense or other dangerous behaviors, trial consultation, child-custody evaluations, etc.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 111 Min Grade D

PSY 396O Mentored Lab Class

Course Description: This course will consist of an individualized, mentored research experience with a faculty member in psychology. Students will be involved in the "in lab" practical realities of conducting research studies in psychology, attend a weekly lab meeting with their paired faculty member and other research assistants, and throughout the semester meet with other faculty members to learn about the depth and breath of psychological research and discuss topics, methodologies and techniques in psychological science.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall.

0 - 3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 112 Min Grade C

PSY 396Q Topic: Computer Applications in Psychology and Human Relations

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 104 Min Grade D

PSY 396R Topic: Psychology of Civic Engagements

Course Description: This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service setting. A strong emphasis on physic engagement will be featured.

3 credits

PSY 396T Topic: Child Psychopathology

Course Description: In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics indepth. Organizational behavior, techniques of counseling, community psychology, and sexual deviance are examples.

3 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 104 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 105 Minimum Grade of D) or ( PSY 110 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D)

PSY 396U Topic: Cognitive Neuropscience

Course Description: This course will examine the neurological bases of higher cognitive functions. Included will be memory, attention, perception, learning and emotion. These topics will be approached from the perspectives of the study of brain damaged humans, functional neuroimaging and, where relevant, research on animals.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 104 Minimum Grade of D or PSY 111 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 396Y Topic: Positive Psychology and Happiness

Course Description: This course focuses on what psychologists have learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. Topics addressed include: identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; examining theoretical perspectives and empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; aspects of the "good life" such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and the application of these theories and findings to everyday life.

3 credits

PSY 396Z Topic: Sports Psychology

Course Description: Performance psychology extends the principles and concepts of sports psychology beyond the athletic arena. The course will focus on issues such as motivation, cognition, stress management, and group dynamics. Techniques and exercises that will be demonstrated and experienced in classes include: goal setting, guided imagery, thought control, relaxation, leadership, and interpersonal relations. It has been scientifically established that these skills can be utilized in a variety of situations (career, academics) where optimum performance is desired.

3 - 4 credits

PSY 397A Topic: Overview of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Theory, Intervention, and Observational Research

3 credits

PSY 499 Senior Year Experience in Human Relations and Psychology

Course Description: The content of this seminar will be a theme or problem selected by the students and faculty, who will organize into subgroups to do research on varying aspects of the theme or problem. Weekly seminars will involve ongoing discussions and development of the topic. Each team will prepare and present papers for discussion in the seminar and will contribute toward the writing of a final comprehensive report. A panel at the Pace University Annual Undergraduate Psychology Conference will include team presentations.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 501 Introduction to School and Clinical Child Psychology I

Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Psychology Program.

Course Description: This is an introductory course on the foundations and delivery of school psychological services. Students will become familiar with the history of school psychology, legal and ethical issues, assessments and interventions issues, and other factors in school psychological service delivery.

Course Rotation: Fall.

0 credits

PSY 502 Introduction to School-Clinical Child Psychology II

Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Psychology program.

Course Description: This course is an extension of the Introduction to School-Clinical Child Psychology I. Student experiences include New York State-mandated child abuse training and the discussion of the application of psychological strategies and techniques. History and systems in psychology as well as issues in the delivery of school psychological services, such as ethics and legal issues, will be covered.

Course Rotation: Spring.

0 credits

PSY 509A Practicum in Psychological Services: Psychotherapy

Prerequisite: Permission of Director of McShane Center.

Course Description: This practicum provides students with training and supervision related to providing psychotherapy.

Course Rotation: TBA.

0 credits

PSY 509B Practicum in Psychological Services: Parent / Infant

Prerequisite: Permission of Coordinator of Parent-Infant Practicum.

Course Description: This practicum provides students with observation and research opportunities related to parent-infant interactions.

Course Rotation: TBA.

0 credits

PSY 509C Practicum in Psychological Services: Biofeedback

Prerequisite: Permission of Coordinator of Biofeedback Practicum.

Course Description: This practicum provides students with training and supervision related to providing biofeedback services.

Course Rotation: TBA.

0 credits

PSY 509D Practicum in Psychological Services: Early Childhood

Prerequisite: Permission of Coordinator of Early Childhood Practicum.

Course Description: This practicum provides students with training and supervision in psychological services to the early childhood population.

Course Rotation: TBA.

0 credits

PSY 509E Practicum in Psychological Services: Neuropsychology Testing

Course Description: This practicum provides students with didactics, training, and supervision related to neuropsychological assessment. Students will learn to administer, score, and interpret various neuropsychological test; they will also learn report writing strategies; and be introduced to neuropsychological diagnostics and relevant clinical issues. They will administer clinical test batteries and receive both individual and group supervision.

0 credits

PSY 509F Biofeedback

Course Description: Biofeedback and short-term symptom-reduction techniques are provided to children, adolescents, and adults referred for stress- related problems or psychological dysfunctions. Symptoms such as migraines and tension headaches are included.

0 credits

PSY 509G Externship

Prerequisite: Permission from the Director of the McShane Center and Director of Field Training required.

Course Description: Students who would like to expand their training activities beyond those that are minimally required for degree completion, may seek additional field experiences in which they deliver psychological services or receive additional training in intervention, consultation, or diagnostic evaluation beyond what is available as part of their current field placement.

0 credits

PSY 509H Diagnosis/Disposition/Outcome Seminar

Course Description: Students are trained to integrate and interpret information gleaned from the initial intake, self-report measures, projective personality tests, and the diagnostic interview. Based upon these data as well as the patient's stated goals, the seminar leaders and participating students develop an initial treatment plan. The Disposition Seminar also conducts psychotherapy outcome research. Patients will be evaluated before, during and after treatment using self-report measures. Therapist, supervisor and patient ratings will also be included.

0 credits

PSY 509J Autism Spectrum Disorders: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention

Course Description: This practicum will introduce the graduate student to children, adolescents and young adults in the autism spectrum, and to their special assessment and intervention needs. Students will have the opportunity to work directly (under supervision) with individuals with autism in group, school, and/or individual contexts. Educational and therapeutic approaches will be considered. In this context, students will be exposed to and gain experience in the use of specialized assessment systems, including measures utilizing video-coding. Core readings from multi-theoretical perspectives, and recent primary research, will be incorporated.

0 credits

PSY 509K Practicum in Trauma and Substance Use

Course Description:The purpose of this practicum is twofold: It will educate students about the mechanisms and dynamics underlying the high co-morbidity rates of PTSD and substance use disorders (SUD). Conceptual and clinical material from various theoretical orientations will be explored, and attention will be given to cultural factors that contribute to these diagnoses. Secondly, the course will prepare students to offer an evidence-based treatment for trauma and SUD called Seeking Safety, which can be implemented in groups or with individuals. Ultimately, this course is designed to diversity students’ clinical skill set through offering cognitive and behavioral tools to address substance abuse in a classroom environment that welcomes the dynamic exploration of these issues as they present in treatment.
Course Rotation:Spring;NY

0 credits

PSY 600 Independent Study in Graduate Psychology

1 - 9 credits

PSY 604 Developmental Psychology

Course Description: This course covers life span psychology. Theories of development, as well as issues in studying development, are addressed. Topics include cognition, language, physical, and social development.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 605 Statistics and Research Method

Course Description:Evaluate primary, empirical research in psychology, translate theoretical ideas into testable research hypotheses, Evaluate these hypotheses by means of a logically developed statistical plan, and conduct exploratory statistical analyses in addition to confirmatory (hypothesis evaluation) analyses.

3 credits

PSY 606 Clinical Work with Adolescents

Course Description: This course will provide a broad overview of clinical practice with adolescents. Topics include: substance abuse, depression, mood disorders, eating disorders and anxiety.

Course Rotation: PLV;Spring

3 credits

PSY 607 Psychology and the Law

Course Description:This course will focus on the application of psychological concepts to the law. Topics covered range from jury selection, jury deliberation, and perception of justice.

3 credits

PSY 608 Community Psychology

Course Description: Community psychology is an action-oriented movement. It is characterized by innovative approaches to problems based upon an ecological and interactionist view of behavioral dynamics in the community. This course covers the development of community psychology as a specialty area in both theory and application, including the central assumptions in methodology of the field. Contributions of an ecological model and emphasis on prevention, competence building, population focus, and related research and interventions will be discussed. The course emphasizes community interventions and the theories and principles needed to help people in various settings achieve maximum mental health.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 609 Introduction to Student Affairs

Course Description: This course is designed for graduate students who wish to explore student affairs in higher education as a possible career choice. This history and philosophy of student affairs will be explored, along with the practical side of the profession. Additionally, students will leave this course prepared to navigate the search process for entry level position in student affairs.

3 credits

PSY 610 Psychopathology

Prerequisite: Admission to MA program.

Course Description: This course provides a survey and review of contemporary thought and research regarding adult and developmental psychopathology appropriate for MA students in psychology. The course provides a variety of views regarding psychopathology, including, for instance, psychobiological, psychological, and sociological perspectives. Diagnostic and assessment issues are covered as well as specific topics in psychopathology, such as eating disorders, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, and schizophrenia.

Course Rotation: NYC: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 612 Neuropsychology

Prerequisite: Admission to M.A. Program.

COurse Description: The neuroanatomical and neurophysiological correlates of behavior are examined in this course. The course addresses basic assumptions about the relationships between brain development and behavioral change. Research methods are discussed in conjunction with prenatal and postnatal brain development. Differentiation of the cerebral cortex, cognitive change., attention , visually guided action, and memory are discussed. In addition, course topics include language acquisition, speech recognition, and perceptual development.

3 credits

PSY 615 Research Design and Statistics I

Course Description: The primary goal of this course is to develop critical thinking skills necessary for students to (1) evaluate primary, empirical research in psychology, (2) translate theoretical ideas into testable research hypotheses, (3) test these hypotheses by means of a logically developed statistical plan. Material to be covered includes scientific methodology and major statistical techniques used in analyzing behavioral data (i.e., correlation/regression analyses, contrast models, analysis of variance, non-parametric procedures). Statistical analyses and graphical representations of data via the computer are required of students.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 616 Research Design and Statistics II

Course Description: This course builds on the critical thinking skills developed in PSY 615. Material to be presented includes (1) complex experimental designs (including quasi experimental design appropriate to field settings) and (2) advanced statistical techniques (e.g., multiple regression analysis, mixed model analysis of variance, multi-variate techniques). Students are required to carry out statistical analyses and graphical representations of data via the computer.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 616 ( Course : PSY 615 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 617 Human Learning

Course Description: This course introduces both basic and advanced principles and theories of learning and motivation, including cognition. Conditioning, behavior systems, generalization and discrimination, information processing, and complex cognitive functioning are some of the topics discussed. Research on learning theory and their general application to a variety of contexts will also be covered.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 618 Community Mental Health: Philosophy and Concepts

Prerequisite: Admission to the M.A., M.S. ED., M.S.ED. Bilingual, or PSY. D. Programs.

Course Description: This course covers the development of community mental health as a specialty area in both theory and application. It emphasizes the development and implementation of preventative interventions in the school and for the community.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 621 Psychological Measurements

Course Description: This course covers basic psychological measurement theory. An introduction to scaling, reliability, validity and other measurement topics is provided.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 623 Social Psychology

Course Description: This course will cover social psychology, including attitudes, behavior change, group processes, multicultural and gender issues, and social perceptions. Focus will be on methods of studying social behavior and theories of social behavior.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 624 Cognitive Psychology

Course Description: This course examines cognitive processes, often called "higher mental processes." Cognitive psychology includes topics such as perception, memory, language, and thinking. This course will give you and appreciation of research and theory in cognitive psychology, an understanding of the methods used to gather and evaluate evidence about cognitive processes, and an understanding of the ways in which knowledge of these processes has been applied to solve problems and improve the quality of life.
Though this course requires a fairly sophisticated background in psychology, it will begin with a basic overview of cognition. Note that much of the research in cognitive psychology is methodologically complex, especially because of the challenge of assessing covert mental processes.

3 credits

PSY 625 Personality Theories

Course Description: This course covers personality theories. Personality factors throughout the lifespan are addressed.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 626 Forensic Psychology

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the interaction between psychology and the legal system, which may include the roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists, the selection/training/evaluation of police, criminal profiling, and hypothesis and lie detection in criminal investigations. Other related issues may include eyewitness identification procedures, police interrogations and confessions, alternative dispute resolution, trial preparation, jury selection, and death penalty trials and appeals.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 630 Helping Relationships: Counseling Theories and Techniques I

Course Description: Students will be introduced to general theories and basic skills used in counseling. The students will be asked to do research and to use audio and videotaping to achieve the skills goal. An understanding of counseling and consultation processes will include and introduction to ethical issues and to the client-counselor relationship.

3 credits

PSY 631 Helping Relationships: Counseling Theories and Techniques II

Course Description: This course will acquaint students with major approaches to psychological counseling and allow them to develop elementary proficiency in applying them to the counseling and consultation process. Special topics include: ethical considerations, confidentiality, and legal issues (e.g., professional liability).

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 631 ( Course : PSY 630 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 632 Orientation to Addiction: Etiology, Screening, Treatment

Course Description: Students completing this course will critically examine various models for understanding the causes of alcoholism and substance abuse and their implications for treatment. The students will become familiar with treatment approaches based on these models. Special emphasis is given to: 12-step and other self-help programs, relapse prevention and psychopharmacology.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 633 Counseling Internship

Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director.

Course Description: Clinical instruction and preparation for early professional experiences in fields work and placement at counseling settings.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

0 credits

PSY 634 Instructional Psychology: Multimedia Applications

Prerequisite: Permission from instructor required.

Course Description: This web-enhanced course is designed as an advanced level course on cognitive principles associated with learning from media (visual, textual, and audio presentation) and the application of these principles to the design of multimedia instruction for effective teaching and learning. Drawing from years of research in cognitive and educational psychology, this course provides materials based on the cognitive theory of multimedia learning and principles for the design of multimedia presentations. The course aims to help students realize the potential of using words (text and/or audio material) and visual elements (pictures, videos, icons) to promote learning. Students will learn about the basic principles of multimedia instructional design and demonstrate their knowledge by completing a multimedia project that adheres to these principles. This course relies heavily on the use of Blackboard’s discussion board.

Course Rotation: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 638 Positive Psychology and Psychotherapy

Course Description: This course will be devoted to a particular domain of research and clinical application, known as "positive psychology". The first part of the course will touch upon some of the fundamental issues in positive psychology, particularly the study if happened and human flourishing. We will try to address a number of different questions, including: Why are some people happier than others? What are the factors that allow people to excel across situations (work, relationships, traumatic events, etc)? How other factors associated with the god life-meaning purpose, gratitude, etc-related to well-being? The second half of the course will look at how our empirical understanding of well-being can be applied to counseling. Examining both research and different treatment modalities, we will review ways to implement positive interventions into therapy.

Course Rotation: PLV:Summer

3 credits

PSY 640 Addiction Counseling I: Individual and Group

Course Description: The students will acquire an understanding of the prominent models (e.g., 12-step, therapeutic community, et al.) of alcoholism/chemical dependency and how individual and group counseling are adapted in working with this population. Students will gain knowledge of the range of individual and group interventions that are appropriate to stages in the recovery process. Students will acquire knowledge of treatment modifications with special populations (e.g., cultural) and will gain an understanding of the treatment of related disorders involving compulsive behaviors. Relapse prevention is covered in depth.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 641 Addiction Counseling II: Family and Group

Course Description: Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of family treatment as they apply to work with chemically dependent/alcoholic families. Students will learn advanced group counseling techniques. The student will acquire an understanding of co-dependent relationship patterns and issues facing children of alcoholics. Students will be able to integrate principles of twelve-step recovery programs and counseling techniques and will gain knowledge of methods of self-development and stress reduction for counselors.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 646 Critical Thinking I : Foundation

Course Description: Enhancement of the skills of observation and evaluation in various personal and work-related situations. Through demonstrations, interactions, and role-playing, participants will explore and study the following basic operations: intuiting, feeling, categorizing, analyzing, synthesizing, explaining and arguing, influencing, cooperating, competing, deciding, committing to values, participating-observing.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 650 Topics in Psychology (Graduate)

Course Description: In a particular semester the course will cover specialized topics in depth.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 650A Topic: Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Course Description: This course will present the theory and clinical application of the majors forms of cognitive behavior therapy, including rational-emotive behavior therapy, multimodal therapy, and cognitive behavior. Attention will be given to interview assessment techniques, determining appropriate treatment goals, use of evaluating client progress. Videos of the founders of the major cognitive and behavioral approaches will be used to supplement class lectures and assigned readings.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 630 Min Grade C and PSY 631 Min Grade C

PSY 650C Field Experience: Research and Program Evaluation

Course Description: This is an introduction to research methods, basic statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Topics include: descriptive statistics, the use of computer technology, principles, models and applications of needs assessment and program evaluation, and ethical (and legal) considerations in research.

Course Rotation: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 650D Special Topics in Psychology: Career and Lifestyle Development

Course Description: This is an introduction to understanding career development and related life factors. Topics include: career development theories and decision-making models; assessment instruments and technologies; career development program planning; interrelationships among work, family, and other life roles; career counseling processes, and ethical (legal) considerations.

Course Rotation: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 650F Topic: Social and Cultural Foundations

Course Description: This is an introduction to understanding the cultural context of counseling and relationships, issues, and trends in a multi-cultural and diverse society. Topics include: theories of multi-cultural counseling and pluralistic trends; attitudes and acculturative experiences; individual, family, group and community strategies with diverse populations; counselors' roles in such issues as social justice and cultural self-awareness; ethical considerations.

3 credits

PSY 650G Field Experience: Counseling Internship I

Course Description: This is a 600-hour internship in a substance abuse counseling, grief counseling, or other approved setting under the clinical supervision of a site supervisor. The seminar students meet weekly with faculty.

3 credits

PSY 650I Topic: Human Sexuality and Relationships

3 credits

PSY 650J Topic: Spiritual Issues in Counseling

3 credits

PSY 650L Topic: Marital and Family Counseling

3 credits

PSY 650P Field Experience: Counseling Internship II

Prerequisite: A student must be employed or have an internship in progress. This course is open to students who need a second 3 credits course for internship certification.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 650G Min Grade B

PSY 650T Domestic Violence: Practical and Psychological Perspectives

Course Description: This course will examine the phenomenon of domestic violence within our society from practical and psychological perspectives. The causes and impacts of this brutal and frequently fatal interaction will be explored as well as society's response. A more complete understanding of this behavior, its perpetrators and its victim, is the goal of this course. This course will be conducted in a lecture forum with the assistance of visual aids and guest speakers to accentuate the significant features and aspects of this topic.

3 credits

PSY 650U Professional Preparation: Review for the Counseling Professional

1 - 3 credits

PSY 650V Topic: Understanding, Preventing and Responding to Violence in Communities

3 credits

PSY 650W Topic: Principles and Techniques of Adlerian Therapy

Course Description: This course is designed to familiarize students with the life and work of Alfred Adler and his disciples. Topics such as social interest, Adlerian contributions to individual and group therapy, education and parenting will be explored. Course will be both lecture-oriented as well as experiential.

3 credits

PSY 650X Forensic Psychology

Course Description: This course will provide students with a broad examination of forensic psychology and will concentrate on the application side of this field. Throughout the course the instructor will emphasize the professional application of psychological knowledge, concepts, and principles to both the civil and criminal justice systems. A wide variety of topics will be discussed and the course will involve lecture, participation, and readings related to this topic.

3 credits

PSY 650Y Special Topic: Addictive Behaviors and Eating Disorders

Course Description: This course will cover how different addictions: drugs, alcohol, food, sex, and more effect relationships. Issues of codependency along with family or origin will be discussed. Students will learn the definition of addictive behavior and characteristics of an addict. Students will learn about drug addiction, food addiction, and relationship addiction along with their consequences.

3 credits

PSY 650Z Topic: Generic Appraisal and Assessment

Course Description: This course is designed to integrate interviewing and appraisal techniques, including studies that provide an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation. Diagnostic assessment will involve the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of various types of tests used in a counseling setting. Skills in test interpretation and counseling techniques will be developed through role-playing, critiquing of actual counseling sessions and peer-group supervision. Upon completion of this course students will have acquired knowledge about all current methods of diagnostic assessment.

3 credits

PSY 651A Topic: Non-Violent Communication in the Home and in the School

Course Description: This course will explore the theory and practice of nonviolent communication and the system of communication and conflict resolution developed by Marshall Rosenberg. The course will focus on N.V.C. as it applies to the practice of psychotherapy, both in individual and couples work. N.V.C. is a powerful method of behavioral and emotional change that integrates aspects of client-centered, cognitive-behavioral, gestalt, existential and psychoanalytic self-psychology. The course will be both cognitive and experiential and offer an optional service component, utilizing this method assisting people in the community.

3 credits

PSY 651B Introduction to Mental Health Counseling and Consultation

3 credits

PSY 651C Issues in Child Psychotherapy

Course Description: Experts from various domains of the field will present on their area of expertise. Participants will be introduced to relevant theory, research, and practice in the area of child psychotherapy. In this interactive course, comprehensive approaches will be introduced with discussion given to the critical roles played by counselors and clients. Topics include, but are not limited to: child psychopathology as defined in the DSM-IV-TR; ethical and legal considerations in working with children; overcoming resistance in children and/or their parents; and working with specific populations, including children with ADHD, children who are aggressive, medically fragile, or domestic violence and trauma survivors.

3 credits

PSY 651F Topic: Counseling Issues for Effective Parenting

Course Description: This course will address two major areas related to counseling for effective parenting. The first focus will be on understanding children's "normal" misbehavior. Students will learn how to teach parents to have healthier and more effective interaction with their children. Typical conflicts that arise in parenting will be addressed with practical, realistic solutions. The second major focus will be on developing the necessary counseling skills for working with parents whose children have exhibited significant problems at home and/or school, including behavioral and learning problems. These skills will be developed from a cognitive-behavioral model. The class will use didactic presentation, source readings, group interactions, and, roleplays.

3 credits

PSY 651G Topic: Psychology of Expressive Therapies: Healing Through Music, Art, Movement, and Film

Course Description: An overview of the dynamics of the healing process through creative art (CA) therapies (e.g. music for Alzheimer's patients, humor for depression). Class interactions will include participatory opportunities in creative art disciplines, CA practitioner speakers, films and selected class trips to special CA events in the Metropolitan area. Students will review most critical psychological studies in expressive therapy.

3 credits

PSY 651H Topic: Cultural and Psychological Heritage of Immigrant and Minority Groups

Course Description: Cultural differences and the dynamic mixture of immigrant ethnic and minority groups are an integral aspect of American society. This course will examine the definitions of culture and related concepts and how immigrant and minortiy group world views affect personal relationships. We will examine current demographic changes and the implications of these factors for counseling in school and mental health settings.

3 credits

PSY 651J Topic: Post Traumatic Stress and Counseling

Course Description: Crisis Counseling and treatment of PSTD focuses on the process and effects of trauma and victimization. Students will learn to counsel direct and indirect victims and guide them to services (e.g., hot lines, stress reduction, support groups, and referrals) which can assist them in regaining control of their lives.

3 credits

PSY 651K Advanced Topics in Mental Health: Pharmacology and Supervision

Course Description: This course will consist of two parts: counselor supervision and psychopharmacology for the counselor. The first part will be a review of the literature on counselor supervision and discussions of the role of the counselor in a clinical supervisory relationship. The second part will be an introduction to psychopharmacology for counselors with an emphasis on psychotherapeutic medications.

3 credits

PSY 651L Topic: Introduction to School Counseling

Course Description: This course will introduce candidates to the role of the school counselor and the relationship of the school counseling program to the educational mission of the school. Special emphasis will be on the National Standards of School Counseling Programs, multicultural and diversity issues impacting school counseling and strategies and techniques that assist students with their academic, personal/social and college/career development.

3 credits

PSY 651M Special Topic: Domestic Violence: Intimate Partner Abuse

Course Description: This course will examine the key issues related to domestic violence; differentiating partner abuse from an unhealthy relationship, motivation for maintaining abusive relationships, legal issues, Feminist Activist Model vs. Mental Health Model and counseling techniques and strategies to help.

3 credits

PSY 651N Special Topic: Sex Education and Counseling: Intimacy and Sexuality

Course Description: This course examines dimensions of human sexuality and intimacy that bear on the role and function of today's counselor. Topics include: human sexual development, defining healthy expressions of intimacy and relatedness, an overview of effects of abuse and violence in relationships including sexual abuse, incest and pornography. Also trends in behaviors related to the transmissions of AIDS and STD's, sexual dysfunctions, treatment modalities and sexual ethics for professional counselors.

3 credits

PSY 651P Special Topic: Mental Health: Principles and Practices of Emotional Well-being

Course Description: This course is designed to assist the mental health practitioners in caring for their own mental health and emotional well-being; preventing "caregiver burn-out"; assisting them in educating clients and/or personnel within various systems - in practices of good mental and emotional health and well-being. Topics relating to emotional health and well-being include: stress management/prevention of burn-out; importance of life purpose and vision; the role of exercise, nutrition, and physical health; prioritizing and balancing one's needs; transforming negative emotional states into positive ones; connecting with self and others; partnering for emotional and physical support. This class is experiential and cognitive, with assigned readings, classroom discussions, and role play.

3 credits

PSY 651Q Special Topic: Professional Development and Ethics

Course Description: This course will facilitate students' preparation of a "professional development plan." Topics include: managing course/internship schedules to optimize career goals including certification and licensure; roles of professional organizations; professional code of ethics and legal considerations in practice; role identity in counselors; fee structures and the impact of fees on the counseling relationship. Parallel topics include APA style writing and presentation as well as general professional writing skills and critical thinking.

3 credits

PSY 651R Topic: Strategies for Preventing School Violence and Conflict

Course Description: This course will examine the individual, family, school, community, and societal factors that contribute to violence in our schools and communities. The course will outline a K-12 school-wide approach for promoting peace and preventing violence in the school and community, with emphasis on teaching pro-social skills.

3 credits

PSY 651S Special Topic: Lifestyle and Addictive Relationships

Course Description: This course will cover how different addictions: drugs, alcohol, food, sex, and more effect relationships. Issues of codependency along with family of origin will be discussed. Students will learn the definition of addictive behavior and characteristics of an addict. Students will learn about drug addiction, food addiction, and relationship addiction along with their consequences.

3 credits

PSY 651T Issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology

Course Description: The intent of this class is to look at some fascinating, and often controversial, issues of childhood and adolescence in a deeper fashion. Specifically, we will examine the research (or lack thereof) behind many proclamations. Some of the prospective issues will be:
1) Are the first three years of life generally the most important?
2) Can we make babies smarter by exposing them to enriched environments?
3) Are there negative developmental effects when mothers work during early infancy?
4) Are peers more important than parents during development?

3 credits

PSY 651U Practices and Applications of Counseling Techniques

Course Description: This class will focus on intensive skills training. We will practice applying several specific techniques for application to both general counseling and particular issues encountered in counseling and psychotherapy. Careful analysis of one's presentation and technique will be emphasized.

3 credits

PSY 651V Special Topics in Psychology: Pharmacology

Course Description: This course will be an introduction to psychopharmacology for counselors with an emphasis on psychotherapeutic medications. Pharmacology is presented as one of several possible treatments, while adhering to the bio-psychosocial model of understanding illness. Students learn the major classes of psychiatric medications, as well as the possible side-effects and problems of specific drugs.

3 credits

PSY 651W Special Topics in Psychology: Couples Counseling

Course Description: This course is a survey of the major approaches to couples counseling. Emotion-focused, cognitive-behavioral, and couples' group counseling approaches are reviewed. Observation of videotaped sessions, role playing of sessions, and application of techniques is emphasized.

3 credits

PSY 651X Topic: Couple Counseling: Empirically-Based Practice

Course Description: This course focuses on understanding and intervening with couples based on theory and interventions that are supported by research. This course begins with a review of literature findings and symptoms of dysfunctional as well as functional marriages. Assessment of couples in order to determine whether intervention is appropriate (or contra-indicated) and plan goals, is included. Various interventions will be reviewed in detail and applied in the classroom. Special topics include: conflict resolution; resistance to change; avoiding relapse; and planning termination.

3 credits

PSY 651Y Special Topic: Technology and Counseling

Course Description:This course explores the increasing use of technology in the counseling field from practical and theoretical viewpoints. Students will study the roles that email, the internet and software can play in counseling. There will also be a major emphasis on the study of emerging technologies, such as Facebook, You Tube and Second Life, Assistive technologies will also be examined.

3 credits

PSY 652 Human Growth and Development

Course Description: The primary objective of this course is to provide a broad overview of the field of development psychology and relate this knowledge to your role as future clinicians. The semester will encompass four major areas: (1) Historical Precedents and Fundamentals Principles-first we will examine the philosophical underpinnings of developmental psychology and related conceptualizations of human nature; (2) Learning and Cognition-we will focus on human learning, examining theories and research that have attempted to explain how humans process information throughout development; (3) Theories of Personality Development; and (4) Issues in Development-here we will take a more focused look at various issues across the life course and how they night affect an individual’s life and present themselves in mental health counseling.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 653 Counseling Issues for Effective Parenting

Course Description: This course will address two major areas related to counseling for effective parenting. This focus would be on understanding children's "normal" misbehavior. Students will learn how to teach parents to have a healthier and more effective interaction with their children. Typical conflicts that arise in parenting will be addressed with practical, realistic solutions.

The second major focus will be on developing the necessary counseling skills for working with parents whose children have exhibited significant problems at home and/or at school, including behavioral and leaning problems.

These skills will be developed from a cognitive-behavioral model. The class will use didactic presentation, source readings, group interaction, and role-plays .

Course Rotation: PL: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 654 Appraisal: Assessment, Reporting and Treatment Planning

Course Description: Students will acquire an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on psychiatric diagnosis (DSM); psychological testing and evaluation in the context of alcoholism and substance abuse; and assessment of functioning, course of treatment, and treatment recommendations with particular applications to substance abusing populations.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 656 Developmental Disabilities

Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Program.

Course Description: This course focuses on developmental disabilities in human development. Factors in vulnerability from infancy to later age levels will be covered, including genetic and environmental variables. Research and theory in developmental disabilities are the main aspects of this course.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 657 Expressive Therapies

Course Description: This is an introduction to the dynamics of the healing process as it is facilitated through creative art (CA) therapies such as music for Alzheimer’s patients or the use of humor with clinically depressed individuals. Learning experiences include in vivo opportunities in the CA disciplines. Learning opportunities also include: CA practitioner speakers, video demonstrations, films and involvement in local clinical settings. Current research in expressive therapies will be reviewed and studied.

Course Rotation: PLV:Spring

3 credits

PSY 658 Group Dynamics

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students a practical and theoretical understanding of group development, dynamics, and group counseling methods and skills. Students completing this course will be able to effectively participate in and lead groups. These goals will be accomplished via presentation and discussion of group models and research study outcomes, through participation in experimental exercises in group processes, and through skill training in observation, leadership, and participation in groups. A special focus will include comparing and contrasting the dynamics and methods used in such groups as substance abuse counseling and others in more general contexts.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 630 Minimum Grade of B or PSY 672 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 659 Mental Health: Principles and Practices of Emotional well-being

Course Description:This course is designed to assist the mental health practitioners in caring for their own mental health and emotional well-being; preventing "caregiver burn-out"; assisting them in educating clients and/or personnel within various systems-in practices of good mental and emotional well-being. Topics relating to emotional health and well-being include: stress management/prevention of burn out; importance of life purpose and vision; the role of exercise, nutrition, and physical health, prioritizing and balancing one’s needs; transforming negative emotional states into positive ones; connecting with self and others, partnering for emotional and physical support. This class is experiential and cognitive, with assigned readings, classroom discussions, and the role play.

Course Rotation: Plv:Spring

3 credits

PSY 660 Death, Loss, and Bereavement: Fundamental Perspectives

Course Description: This course will introduce basic concepts in the field of death, dying and loss. Course topics will be taught through a combination of formal lectures, and experimental exercises. The course will provide cultural, historical perspectives, and psychological insights into the experiences of death and dying. Special emphases include: the impact of death and loss on personality development, on family systems and survivors of loss.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 661 Grief Counseling

Course Description: This course focuses on the different therapeutic interventions to assist others through bereavement experiences. Models of loss, grief, and mourning will be examined for their use in counseling with special attention to complicated mourning. Lectures, experiential work, and case studies to be used. Each student will lead, under supervision, a short-term grief counseling group.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 662 Loss and Bereavement Counseling Across the Life Span

Course Description: This course places the experiences of loss and grieving in the context of the cycle of individual and family development. The impact of death on families and on the development of the family members will be examined. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of loss and bereavement on the meaning structures of families and individuals.

Course Rotation: Summer.

3 credits

PSY 663 Strategies for Preventing YouthViolence and Conflict

Course Description: This course is designed to inform the counseling student about the strategies that are available to them as counselors in working with youths and their parents that prevents or greatly reduces the probability of youths being involved in violent incidents. The focus will be on prevention, rather than cure, but will also deal with strategies for working with youth and their parents should any form of violence occur, in spite of best efforts to prevent it.
We will look at the problem of "bullying" and gangs and how to deal with these problems. The course will also cover how to spot and deal with potentially deviant "outliers" –i.e. , youth who may be depressed and suicidal or otherwise mentally ill, and who may be potential perpetrators of violence, and also with depressed youth less inclined to outward-directed violence, but considered suicide. We will also look at best strategies for dealing with and ameliorating the traumatic effects of these and other forms of violence, should they occur.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 664 Building your Ideal Private Practice

Course Descripiton: This is a course designed to assist students in developing the knowledge base, skills, and confidence to develop a successful private counseling practice. It will touch on getting the experience and supervision necessary before beginning one’s own practice, and the will concentrate on what is needed to successfully start one’s own practice, maintain, and/or expand and diversify it.

Course Rotation:PLV:Fall;Summer

3 credits

PSY 665 Counseling Clients and Their Families with Chronic Illnesses

Course Description: This course is an introduction to psychological and biological aspects of AIDS and other chronic illnesses. Students will have an opportunity to learn counseling skills related to disease issues with a variety of populations.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

PSY 667 Multicultural and Gender Issues in Psychology

Course Description: This course considers the range of multicultural and gender issues involved in human development and learning. The focus in this course is on development and related multicultural and gender issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 668 Spiritual Issues in Counseling

Course Description: This course will explore an important and often neglected aspect of counseling; the client’s spiritual/religious beliefs. Topics to be covered include spiritual explanations for suffering: counseling perspectives of the major spiritual/religious traditions; special needs and problems of religious client; the counselors own belief system; and, the clinical use of the client’s belief. The course will employ didactic lecture, group discussion and exercises, case study presentations, and , role-plays of counseling sessions.

Course Rotation:PLV:Fall

3 credits

PSY 669 Couple Counseling

Course Description:This course is a survey of the major approaches to couples counseling. Emotion focused, cognitive-behavioral and couple’s group counseling approaches are reviewed. Observation of videotaped sessions, role playing of sessions, and application of technique is emphasized.

Course Rotation: PLV:Spring

3 credits

PSY 670 Case Management in Treating Addictions

Course Description: Students completing this course will be familiar with activities that bring services together within a planned framework of action for achieving treatment goals in the context of alcoholism and substance abuse. Demonstrated knowledge will be expected in the following areas: client education and preventive action, outreach referral services crisis intervention and consultation, client record keeping, and discharge planning.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 632 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 671 Non-Violent Communication

Course Description: Nonviolent Communication or NVC, also known as Compassionate Communication is a powerful theory and system of interpersonal communication and conflict resolution developed over the past 40 years by the psychologist Marshall Rosenberg. This system has been used throughout the world, helping people in over 40 countries, to resolve the conflicts that divided them. As a system of communication, NVC requires a paradigm shift in the way people typically communicate with one another. It is one that is far more effective in helping people to connect with each other, and as a result, to resolve their differences. As a theory of behavior, Nonviolent Communication, draws upon the best in client-centered, cognitive-behavioral, gestalt, existential and psychoanalytic self-psychology and is an effective system for psychological healing, as well as for promoting personal growth and change. This course will introduce the basic theory and practices of this system, experientially as well as cognitively, and show how these practices can be applied in home and counseling settings.

Course Rotation: PLV:Fall

3 credits

PSY 672 Psychopathology and Personality Disorders

Course Description: This course will allow students to become proficient in the understanding and use of psychiatric terminology and in the forming and testing of hypotheses about using criteria set forth in DSM-IV. Upon completion of the course, students will have knowledge of the principle pharmacological and psychological approaches to treatment of the disorders discussed.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 673 Domestic Violence: Intimate partner abuse

Course Description: This course will examine the key issues related to domestic violence: differentiating partner abuse from an unhealthy relationship, motivation for maintaining abusive relationships, legal issues, Feminist Activist Model vs. Mental Health Model and counseling techniques and strategies to help.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring

3 credits

PSY 674 Integrating Seminar: Professional Orientation and Ethics

Prerequisite: Students must have taken 42 credits before registering. Needs Approval from Program Director.

Course Descriptions: This is, in most cases, one of the final courses in your master’s degree program of study. In it, we will bring together key topics you have learned as well as selected special topics for review and examination, the specific objectives of the course are: (1) to reflect on and examine your own views on personality, psychopathology, and counseling & psychotherapy, as these are informed by different theories and techniques; (2) to identify your vales as these might affect your work as a counselor; and (3) to understand professional and ethical issues in counseling by reviewing relevant ethical codes and legal requirements.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

PSY 675 Field Experience: Internship I

Prerequisite: Students must have an internship in place before registering. Department approval required.

Course Description: This is a 300-hour internship in Mental Health Counseling (e.g. Substance abuse counseling, grief counseling, or other approved counseling) setting under the clinical supervision of a site supervisor. The seminar students meet weekly with faculty.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 630 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 658 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 672 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 687 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 676 Field Experience in Counseling: Internship II

Prerequisite: Students must have an internship in place before registering. Department approval required.

Course Description: A 300-hour internship in a substance abuse counseling, grief counseling, or other approved setting under the clinical supervision of a site supervisor. The seminar students meet weekly with faculty.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 675 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 677 Research and Program Evaluation

Course Description: This is an introduction to research methods, basic statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Topics include: the importance of research, descriptive statistics, research methods, the use of computer technology, principles, models and applications of needs assessment and program evaluation, use of research to improve counseling effectiveness, and ethical (legal) considerations in research.

Course Rotation: Fall, Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 630 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 672 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 678 Career and Lifestyle Development

Course Description: This is an introduction to understanding career development and related life factors. Topics include: career development theories and decision-making models; career, educational, and labor market resources; career/educational planning, assessment instruments and technologies; career development program planning; interrelationships among work, family, and other life roles; career counseling processes, and ethical (legal) considerations.

Course Rotation: Fall, Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 630 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 631 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 679 Marriage and Family Systems and Counseling: Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse and Maltreatment

Course Description: An introduction to family counseling. Beginning with a brief history of this approach, it covers philosophical and etiological premises of family counseling. This course constitutes a survey of some of the major approaches to family therapy that are in use today. An important segment of this course covers the NYS-mandated training in recognition and reporting of child abuse and maltreatment.

Course Rotation: Spring, Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 679 ( Course : PSY 630 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 680 Program Evaluation

Course Description: Advanced course in evaluation research emphasizing both traditional and non-traditional designs. The course examines how to evaluate school, mental health and social programs along with different orientations to program evaluation. Program evaluation within a variety of contexts will be reviewed.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 615 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 616 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 681 Organizational Psychology

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of topics, including theories, related research findings and their practical implications in the field of organizational psychology. Topics will include a history of organizational psychology, work attitudes, work motivation, group processes, and leadership.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 682 Personnel Psychology

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of topics, including theories, related research findings and their practical implications in the field of psychology. Topics will include job analysis, employee selection and classification, performance appraisal and feedback, criterion theory and development training, and legal issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 685 Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling

Course Description: This course provides an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society related to such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, education, family values, religious and spiritual values, socioeconomic status and unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities including: multicultural and pluralistic trends, attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences, strategies for working with diverse populations, social justice, advocacy and conflict resolution, theories of multicultural counseling, and ethical and legal considerations.

Course Rotation: Spring, Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 685 ( Course : PSY 630 . Minimum Grade of B. ) and (Course : PSY 631 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 686 Appraisal and Assessment of Individuals, Couples, Families, and Groups

Course Description: This course integrates individual and group approaches to interviewing and appraisal techniques, including an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation, including historical perspectives to assessment, general principles of case conceptualization, reliability and validity and statistical concepts and basic concepts of various assessment techniques, as well as ethical and legal issues. Diagnostic assessment involves the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of various types of tests used in a counseling setting and the factors related to the assessment and evaluation of individuals, groups, and specific populations.

Course Rotation: Fall, Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 630 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 672 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 687 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling and Consultation

Course Description: This course is designed to promote a foundational appreciation and understanding of the various issues that confront mental health professionals. It is also intended to provide an understanding and appreciation. The course also seeks to provide the student with the basic tools and information to make informed decisions in the light of existing regulations, policies, laws and code of ethics.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, Summer.

3 credits

PSY 688 Sex Education and Counseling: Intimacy and Sexuality

Course Description: This course examines the dimensions of human sexuality and intimacy that bear on the role and function of today’s counselor. Topics include: human sexual development, defining healthy expressions of intimacy and relatedness, an overview of effects of abuse and violence in relationships including sexual abuse, incest and pornography. Also trends in behaviors related to the transmissions of AIDS and STD’s, sexual dysfunctions, treatment modalities and sexual ethics for professional counselors.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring

3 credits

PSY 689 Psychological Resilience

Course Description: This course examines the construct of psychological resilience in response to the acute and chronic stressors of childhood and adulthood. Theories of resilience from early in the 20th century to the present day will be reviewed in light of empirical evidence. Emphasis on resilience as a normative response to stress that is achieved in various ways and reflects arrayed person-centered and social-contextual factors. Positive psychology as a means of enhancing resilience will also be examined.

3 credits

PSY 690 Counseling 2.0:Counseling in the Digital Age

Course Description: This course will expose students to numerous emerging technologies and will give them the skills to access, utilize and critique in terms of how the tools can be applied to the counseling world.

Course Rotation:PLV:Spring

3 credits

PSY 691 Practicum in Psychology

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member and Coordinator of the M.A. program, or Director of Graduate Programs, this course offers field training experience for M.A. students involving a designated number of supervised hours in an approved agency. Evaluations are made of student performance by supervising personnel of the agency and by faculty supervisors. Students must contact the Coordinator of the M.A. program prior to the semester of actual placement.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 693 Research Seminar in Mental Health Counseling

Course Description: This seminar will develop skills in conducting research in the field of mental health counseling and applied psychology. The seminar examines research through readings and discussions of published research and through research projects that are conceived and initiated in this course. The students’ research projects will be mentored by faculty, and will be processed and monitored in weekly seminar meetings.

3 credits

PSY 695 Independent Study in Graduate Psychology

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, student's advisor, and/or M.A. program coordinator, students may select topic-guided research or supervised practica not included in the regular course offerings within the M.A. in Psychology Program. This course may include practica, thesis work, or research collaborative work with faculty research. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or appropriate paper must also be submitted. (This course may be taken only once.)

Course Rotation: TBA.

1 - 3 credits

PSY 696C Topic: Feminist Theory and Application

Course Description: The focus of this course is on the history, philosophy, theory and practice of feminist psychology. The student will be introduced to feminist theory by exploring, documenting and presenting on e of the oldest feminist organizations in the United States Association for Women in Psychology (AWP). The student will be able to analyze, interpret and apply feminist ideology, research findings and therapy in academic and counseling settings.

3 credits

PSY 696D Topics: Counseling Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Clients

Course Description: This class explores a variety of perspectives on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered issues, all of which provide the basis for current research and practice in the fields of counseling, education and psychology. Many professional organizations in the field have developed formal ethical guidelines requiring non-discrimination and are active in promoting and abiding by them. The class will provide an introduction to LGBT issues while examining heterosexism and homophobia as well as the social constructions of identity. A wide-range of concerns for LGBT clients, including but not limited to: career development and health concerns, family counseling, the role of difference in identity, and religion/spirituality, will be discussed.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall.

3 credits

PSY 696E Psychological and Social Dimensions of Public Health

Course Description: This course exposes students to aspects of the behavioral and social sciences relevant to public health. It is designed to make students more sophisticated analysts of health problems, by increasing their understanding of how individuals and their environments interact with health; individuals are part of the environment. Major scientific theories and models of health behavior are presented early in the course. The remainder of the course focuses on important social factors and specific behaviors, with an emphasis on the science and primary and secondary prevention.

3 credits

PSY 699 M.A. Thesis

Prerequisite: Department approval required.

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member and coordinator of the M.A. program or Department Chairperson, students may conduct an original research project with the supervision of a faculty member. The student meets and regularly consults with the faculty member to provide guidance and to review progress on the research project. A research paper must be submitted upon completion of the course.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 703 Psychological Assessment I

Prerequisite: PSY 704 and PSY 717 and PSY 721 and PSY 725 and undergraduate Abnormal Psychology and Personality Theories.

Course Description: An investigation of theories of intelligence testing. Intensive study of Wechsler scales for children and adults and an introduction to the Stanford-Binet-Revised as instruments for ascertaining intelligence, style of cognitive functioning and personality dynamics. The emphasis is on the administration, scoring and interpretation of these tests in relation to theories of intelligence and personality. Standards of ethics in testing, as defined by A.P.A. guidelines are discussed. The laboratory experience, workshops and demonstrations supplement lectures and discussions. This course will include at least six hours of training in multicultural issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 703 ( Course : PSY 704 . Minimum Grade of B. ) and (Course : PSY 717 . Minimum Grade of B. ) and (Course : PSY 721 . Minimum Grade of B. ) and (Course : PSY 725 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 703A Practice: Limiting Bias in the Assessment of the Bilingual Child

Course Description: The emphasis of this course will be placed on the presentation of a model that explains the theory and practice of bilingual assessment in order to protect the rights of language minority students by: examining pre-referral characteristics which may help differentiate students with learning disabilities from students who are second language learners; identifying best practices in formal and informal assessment appropriate for identification of disabilities and giftedness in language minority students; using formal and informal assessment data in developing IEP's for language minorities students; coordinating services for LEP students (ESL, Bilingual, special education).

Course Rotation: TBA.

1 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 703A ( Course : PSY 703 . Minimum Grade of B. May be taken concurrently.)

PSY 704 Advanced Developmental Psychology

Course Description: A systematic study of child and adolescent psychological growth and development is presented. Scientific methods of studying childhood, constitutional and social factors contributing toward personality growth and problems of adjustment stemming from changes in human capacities, abilities and needs are studied. The course includes cognitive development, language development, physical development and social-emotional development and focuses on developmental theory and research.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 275 Minimum Grade of D and PSY 303 Minimum Grade of D

PSY 707 Psychological Assessment II

Course Description: Concentration on the administration, scoring and interpretation of the Stanford Binet-Revised and Weschsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised and an introduction to the theory and application of specialized tests, such as the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, Vineland Social Maturity Scales, McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised. The Wide Range Achievement Test and other psychoeducational assessment procedures will also be discussed. Stress will be placed on developing overall assessment capabilities, developing observational skills, formulating assessment-intervention links, preparing developmental histories, and understanding diagnostic and recommendation aspects of report preparation. This course will include at least six hours of training in multicultural issues and at least three hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

Prerequisites

(PSY 603 Minimum Grade of C or PSY 703 Minimum Grade of B) and ( PSY 627 Minimum Grade of C or PSY 727 Minimum Grade of B)

PSY 709A Prac: Counselng the Culturally Different: Implications for Bilingual Psychological Service Provision

Course Description: This course is a practicum course that supplements the counseling theory courses in the Psy.D program by focusing on the theory and practice of providing counseling services for bilingual populations. The focus of the course will be on providing counseling services for bilingual populations. The focus of the course will be on providing counseling services to bilingual children and adolescents and their families. The course will focus on helping students to: develop sensitivity to cultural and sub-cultural differences; understand barriers that exist in cross-cultural counseling; understand the processes of cultural accommodation and assimilation, and cultural identity formation; and understand the implications that bilingualism has for the counseling process. An additional focus of the course will be on helping bilingual students adjust to the educational programs that are being offered in the school and community settings. Issues related to helping other professionals recognize and develop skills for cross cultural counseling will be discussed.

Course Rotation: TBA.

1 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 709 Minimum Grade of B or PSY 711 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 710 Psychopathology in Childhood and Adolescence

Course Description: Study of etiology, characteristics and treatment of personality deviation in children and adolescents. Implications for learning and school placement will be studied for each of the disorders. This course will include at least six hours of training in multicultural issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 711 Intervention Techniques I: Psychodynamic Perspectives

Course Description: This is a course on the theories and techniques of individual psychotherapeutic interventions from psychodynamic perspectives. Basic principles and techniques of psychodynamic psychotherapies will be presented. Components of the therapeutic process and interaction will be defined and illustrated. Case material from student's field experiences will be discussed.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 710 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 712 Advanced Physiological Psychology

Course Description: The neuroanatomical and neurophysiological and biological correlates of select behaviors will be explored. The focus of thiscourse is neuropsychological assessment with children and adolescents. Specific focus will be upon those behaviors which are of interest to the school-clinical child psychologist.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 712 ( Course : PSY 727 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 713 Psychological Assessment III

Prerequisite: PSY 703 and PSY 710 and PSY 725 and full matriculation.

Course Description: The goals of this course involve -toward competency- of the use of "projective" clinical measures applied in the course of personality assessment. These measures include (but are not limited to) the Rorschach Test, the Thematic Apperception Test (as well as associated versions of the Children's Apperception Test), figure drawings, and sentence completions. The symbolic play of younger children, as utilized in assessment, is also relevant to such appraisal. Administrative techniques will be reviewed, along with a focus on accurate scoring, strategic approaches to data analysis, and ways of delineating meaning from verbalizations (content and style). Consideration will be given to the ethical dilemmas that emerge when we apply tests that seek to go beyond conscious self-report in terms of interpretation. Stress factors pertaining to the administration of projectives will be considered. In addition, clinical, cultural, environmental, and developmental issues that need to be factored into use of these measures will be discussed.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 713 ( Course : PSY 703 . Minimum Grade of B. ) and (Course : PSY 710 . Minimum Grade of B. ) and (Course : PSY 725 . Minimum Grade of B. )

PSY 715 Statistics and Research Design I

Prerequisite: Undergraduate "Psychology Statistics" and "Experimental Psychology" or permission of the instructor. Admission to the MS ED/PSY. D. Programs.

Course Description: The primary goal of this course is to develop critical thinking skills necessary for students to (1) evaluate primary, empirical research in psychology, (2) translate theoretical ideas into testable research hypotheses, (3) test these hypotheses by means of a logically developed statistical plan. Material to be covered include the process of scientific inquiry and the logic of the scientific method and major statistical techniques used in analyzing behavioral data (i.e., correlational/regression analyses, contrast models). Statistical analyses and graphical representations of data via the computer and preparation of scientific reports based on these analyses are required of students.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

PSY 716 Statistics and Research Design II

Course Description: This course builds on the critical thinking skills developed in PSY 715 by adding to the students' research repertoire skills enabling them to apply statistical procedures and research designs tailored to the needs of quasi-experimental research. Material to be presented includes (1) theoretical coverage of the process of scientific inquiry and implications regarding field research and (2) familiarization with statistical techniques most often used in establishing statistical control (i.e., multiple regression analysis). Students are required to carry out statistical analyses and graphical representations of data via the computer and develop a fully operational empirical research proposal. This course will include at least three hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for PSY 716 ( Course : PSY 715 . Minimum Grade of B. May be taken concurrently.)

PSY 717 Psychology of Learning: Theory and Applications

Prerequisite: An Undergraduate Learning course.

Course Description: This is an advanced learning course intended to familiarize students with traditional and contemporary learning theories. Special emphasis will be placed on applications of learning theory to a range of school and agency settings. The relevance of learning theory to instructional processes, behavior management and the amelioration of cognitive/affective and interpersonal difficulties in children and adolescents will be covered.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 720 Integrating Seminar

Prerequisite: Completion of all courses in the first and second years of the program.

Course Description: This is a psychodiagnostic seminar in which material from students' field placements will be used to extrapolate general principles of psychological test battery analysis, synthesis and integration with case history information. Each student will present to the class the raw data of a complete psychological test battery with case history information. Issues of psychological test administration, psychodiagnosis, psychological report writing, communicating test findings and implementing recommendations will be addressed.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 721 Tests and Measurements

Prerequisite: Admission to the MSED/PSY. D. Programs.

Course Description: This course surveys psychological testing, covering test theory and the variety of current tests. Test theory topics include scaling, reliability, validity, decision-making, item-analysis, and test construction with norm- and criterion-referenced tests. Principles of test construction are applied to intelligence, aptitude, achievement, occupational, interest and personality tests. This course will include at least three hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 722 Intervention Tech II: Cognitive-Behavioral Perspectives

Course Description: This is an introductory survey course in the theory and techniques of counseling in the school setting. Study of various issues related to counseling and intervention services. This is a course on the theories and techniques of psychotherapeutic interventions from cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies will be presented. Components of the therapeutic process and interaction will be defined and illustrated. Case material from students' field experience will be discussed. This course will include at least three hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 723 Advanced Social Psychology

Course Description: Advanced social psychology is the scientific study of how individuals are affected by the social structure (e.g., other people, physical settings, cultural/environmental factors). The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the theoretical formulations (e.g, cognitive dissonance), research methodologies, and the practical applications in social psychology. The major topics covered will include person perception, social influence, authority pressure and power, attitude change, racism, sexism, presocial behavior and altruism, aggression and violence, and social stress. The historical roots of the field, and the goals and methodology in social psychology will be presented. This course will include at least six hours of training in multicultural issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 725 Advanced Personality Theories

Prerequisite: Undergraduate "Abnormal Psychology" and "Personality Theory."

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the major theories of personality. Emphasis will be placed on how theories address the development of self-concept, anxiety, and "normal" vs. "abnormal" development. The ways in which social climate, the personality/life experiences of the theorist, and research shape theory will be examined. The role of culture, ethnicity/race, class, and gender on personality development will be examined. The impact of the theories on the delivery of human services will also be explored. This course will include at least six hours of training in multicultural issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 726 Theoretical Assessment and Intervention Skills Integration

Prerequisite: Admission to the MSED/PSY.D. Programs.

Course Description: This course will focus on theoretical perspectives in the integration of psychodiagnostic assessment and intervention with consideration for age, levels of functioning, developmental stage, diversity issues and type of psychopathology. A variety of empirically supported assessment and intervention techniques will be reviewed within the context of assessing and intervening with specific disorders. Techniques of assessment (e.g., structured clinical interview, projective measures, broad self-report and specific focused assessment) will be presented from various theoretical perspectives with links to a variety of intervention strategies to provide a comprehensive and integrated overview of service delivery.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 727 Learning Disabilities-Diagnosis/Remediation: Theories and Practice

Course Description: This course is designed to provide a thorough awareness of the multiple etiologies of learning disabilities. It is structured for psychologists and gives a comprehensive view of the theories, diagnostic procedures and remedial strategies for learning disabilities in children. Students are required to research and present a diagnostic or remedial system.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 728 Advanced Psychodiagnosis

Course Description: This is an advanced course in psychodiagnostic testing. Students will present to the class the raw data of a complete battery of tests for class analysis and synthesis, without knowledge of case history information. Psychodiagnostic and dispositional issues will be addressed. Intervention options will be covered.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 620 Min Grade C or PSY 720 Min Grade B or PSY 613 Min Grade C or PSY 713 Min Grade B

PSY 734 Consultation

Course Description: This course will cover the theory and practice of consultation. The consultation process will be examined from the following perspectives: psychodynamic, behavioral, ecological, instructional, social psychological, child advocacy, organization development, and process consultation. Each student will be expected to complete a practicum project using one of these perspectives. Strategies for understanding the impact of an agency upon the consultation process, moving from direct to indirect service delivery, evaluating consultation outcome, and understanding the interactive nature of the consultation process will also be addressed. This course will include at least three hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 737 Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

Course Description: This course introduces students to effective methods in child and adolescent psychotherapy, with a particular focus on convergences and divergences among contemporary techniques. Toward these ends, we will consider therapeutic techniques in terms of the theories in which they are anchored; we will compare and contract behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, psychoanalytic, object-relational, self-psychological, and other approaches, as they are embedded in play-therapy, individual psychotherapy, and parent-guidance techniques. Moreover, we will consider specific therapeutic methods associated with child and adolescent diagnostic presentations; i.e., we will explore the match between assessment/diagnosis and treatment/therapy. Knowledge of developmental psychopathology and changes processes will inform our discussion of the specific techniques employed in psychotherapy with children and adolescents, as well as help us address the multiple contexts of development, family, culture, and therapeutic relationship. This course will include at least six hours of training in multicultural issues and three hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 722 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 743 Advanced Seminar in School-Clinical Child Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to the PSY.D. Program.

Course Description: Seminar on issues related to the role and functions of the school psychologist with the clinical-child orientation. Special emphasis in this course varies based on professional, legal and ethical issues; supervision of school-clinical child psychological services; and analysis of past, present and future trends in the field of school-clinical child psychology.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

PSY 750 School-Clinical Child Psychology I: Internship, Ethics and Seminar

Not open to students who have taken PSY 750A.

Course Description: Supervised experience in a school setting. Internship will include observation and practice supervised jointly by district and University psychologists. In addition, there will be weekly seminar meetings at which pertinent issues and research in the field of school psychology and the delivery of services to special needs children will be discussed. Ethical issues will be covered through class reading material and class discussions. School psychology in the context of history and systems in psychology will be covered. Requires 3 days per week for 20 weeks. This course will include at least 15 hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 720 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 750A Bilingual School-Clinical Child Psychology I: Internship and Seminar

Course Description: This course involves supervised experience in a school setting. The internship will include observation and practice supervised jointly by district and University psychologists. In addition, there will be weekly seminar meetings at which pertinent issues and research in the field of school psychology and delivery of services to special needs children and bilingual populations will be discussed. There will be a special focus on issues related to delivering psychological services in the native language. Ethical issues will be covered through class reading material and class discussions. School psychology in the context of history and systems in psychology will be covered. Requires 3 days per week for 20 weeks. This course will include at least 15 hours of training in ethical issues. Students must have successfully completed a language proficiency examination and demonstrate competence to provide services in the native language.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

PSY 751 School-Clinical Child Psychology II: Internship, Ethics, and Seminar

Course Description: Continuation of supervised experience in a school setting. Ethical problems, the relationship between the school and the community, the functions of various school personnel, and problems in the field of school psychology will be discussed. The focus will be on current professional ethics in schools and community settings, legal issues, providing services to special needs children and school psychology in the context of history and systems in psychology. This course will include at least 15 hours of training in ethical issues.

Course Rotation: TBA.

4 credits

PSY 751A Bilingual School Clinical Child Psychology II Internship/Seminar

Course Description: This course is a continuation of supervised experience in a school setting. Ethical problems, the relationship between the school and the community, the functions of various school personnel, and problems in the field of school psychology will be discussed. Students will present cases involving bilingual assessment and intervention which will be discussed. In addition, consultation issues related to service delivery to bilingual populations will be discussed. The focus will be on current professional ethics in schools and community settings, legal issues, providing services to special needs children, providing services to bilingual populations, and school psychology in the context of history and systems in psychology. This course will include at least 15 hours of training in ethical issues.

4 credits

PSY 759 Early Childhood and Infant Assessment

Course Description: This course focuses on assessment and intervention with the early childhood and infant population. Assessment will focuses on early development, psycho-education and family dynamic issues. Intervention will consider curriculum and instruction and psychological concerns. Early childhood consultation is included in this course.

3 credits

PSY 777 History and Systems in Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to the Psy. D. Program or permission of the Director of Graduate Psychology Programs.

Course Description: This is a graduate level course in the history of psychology. The major theoretical issues, trends, historical figures and systems in psychology are the focus of this course.

3 credits

PSY 810 Advanced Psychopathology

Course Description: This advanced course in psychopathology builds upon prior learning to further extend knowledge of mental disorders and differential diagnostic practices regarding adults, children, and adolescents. Disorders are reviewed in terms of current classification, empirical research, and relevant theory. Students will be encouraged to consider underlying assumptions pertaining to diagnosis, to compare categorical and dimensional diagnostic approaches, to learn more about the clinical interview process, and to view psychological, biological; (genetic and neuropsychological), social dynamic, and developmental aspects of a broad array of clinical conditions. Special attention will apply to the personality disorders. The diagnostic process will be carefully considered in terms of validity, cultural factors, ethical issues, and treatment implications.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 710 Min Grade C

PSY 820 Summer Internship

Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Field Training.

Course Description: Supervised experience in a community setting required of all students who will be in their field placement in the months of July and August. Externship will encompass five days per week (eight hours a day) and will include observation and practice. Placement will be in various health clinics, addiction services, child welfare services, departments of correction, family courts, etc., under the direct supervision of licensed agency and University psychologists. Must be taken by students completing the community externship in one year.

0 credits

PSY 821 School-Clinical Child Psychology Internship I: Practicum and Seminar

Course Description: Supervised internship experience in an agency, school or community setting. This field experience requires 2 and a half days per week field work (eight hours a day for 20 weeks). Placement will be in various health clinics, addiction services, child welfare services, departments of correction, family courts, etc., under the direct supervision of licensed agency and University psychologists. In addition, there will be weekly seminar meetings at which pertinent issues in the field of school-clinical child psychology will be discussed.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 707 Min Grade B and PSY 713 Min Grade B and PSY 720 Min Grade B and PSY 750 Min Grade B

PSY 822 School-Clinical Child Psychology Internship II: Practicum and Seminar

Course Description: Continuation of supervised internship experience in an agency, school or community setting. This field experience also will encompass two and one half days per week field work (eight hours a day) for 20 weeks. Supervision will be continued by licensed agency and University psychologists. Placements will also be made so as to enhance the range of acquired competencies, as well as broaden exposure to different types of settings. Weekly seminars will be conducted to discuses issues and experiences that arise in field placements.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 821 Min Grade B

PSY 823 School-Clinical Child Psychology Internship III: Practicum and Seminar

Course Description: Supervised internship experience in an agency, school or community setting. This field experience requires 2 and a half days per week field work (eight hours a day for 20 weeks). Placement will be in various health clinics, addiction services, child welfare services, departments of correction, family courts, etc., under the direct supervision of licensed agency and University psychologists. In addition, there will be weekly seminar meetings at which pertinent issues in the field of school-clinical child psychology will be discussed.

2 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 613 Min Grade D and PSY 620 Min Grade D

PSY 824 School-Clinical Child Psychology Internship IV: Practicum and Seminar

2 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 823 Min Grade B

PSY 825 School-Clinical Child Psychology Internship V: Practicum and Seminar

Course Description: Continuation of supervised internship experience in an agency, school or community setting. This field experience also will encompass two and one half days per week field work (eight hours a day) for 20 weeks. Supervision will be continued by licensed agency and University psychologists. Placements will also be made so as to enhance the range of acquired competencies, as well as broaden exposure to different types of settings. Weekly seminars will be conducted to discuses issues and experiences that arise in field placements.

2 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 824 Min Grade B

PSY 826 School-Clinical Child Psychology Internship IV: Practicum and Seminar

2 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 825 Min Grade B

PSY 828 Advanced Psychodiagnosis

Prerequisite: A grade of "B" or better in PSY 713 and PSY 720, and permission from program advisor required.

Course Description: This is an advanced course in psychodiagnostic testing. Students present to the class the raw data of a complete battery of tests for class analysis and synthesis, without knowledge if case history information. Psychodiagnostic and dispostional issues will be addressed. Intervention options will be covered.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 713 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 720 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 829 Family Interventions

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY. D. Program.

Course Description: A survey course in contemporary theories and techniques of family interventions in school-community settings. Short-term dynamic and cognitive behavioral intervention methods are discussed and illustrated with case material. Family systems approaches including communications, experiential, strategic, structural, and extended family approaches will be reviewed.

3 credits

PSY 834 Doctoral Project Seminar

Prerequisite: Admission to the PSY.D. Program. This course may be taken for zero credit or one credit, depending on when the student started the program. A $50 fee is charged if the student takes the course for 1 credit. Students must see their advisor before registering for this course.

Course Description: This seminar provides a structured framework for the development of the Psy.D. doctoral project. Quantitative, methodological, and ethical issues relevant to students' research proposals are discussed. Fully developed research proposals are presented to faculty and peers and subjected to rigorous review. Implementation of their proposed research is contingent upon faculty approval.

0- 1 credits

PSY 835 Doctoral Colloquium

Prerequisite: PSY 834 and admission to the PSY.D. Program.

Course Description: This seminar provides a structured framework for the completion of the Psy.D. doctoral project. Issues regarding the statistical analyses and interpretation of research findings are of primary concern for discussion. Research results are presented to faculty and peers and are rigorously critiqued. The completion of their Psy.D. doctoral project is contingent upon faculty approval.

0 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 834 Min Grade P

PSY 839 Psychoanalytic Theory

Prerequisite: Admission into the PSY. D. Program.

Course Description: This course will explore recent developments in psychoanalytic theory and technique. The starting point is Freud's cases, his clinical papers and the techniques relevant to early discoveries. Based upon this foundation, these various elaborators and revisions of theory will be examined.

3 credits

PSY 842 Crisis Intervention: Brief and Short Term Psychotherapies

Prerequisite: Admission to the PSY. D. Program.

Course Description: This course will survey the history and techniques of crisis intervention, brief and short-term psychotherapies from psychodynamic, strategic, and solution-focused intervention perspectives. Illustrative case material from students' field experiences will be discussed.

3 credits

PSY 844 Advanced Topic: Parenthood and Parent-Child Relations

Course Description: Parenthood and parent-child relations are universally acknowledged as a major influence on child and adolescent school adaptation and functioning. This course provides knowledge of relevant empirical research on the role of parenthood as a major influence on child and adolescent school functioning. In addition, skills in applying methods and techniques for professional interventions with parents are covered. Methods and techniques of working with parents individually, as a couple, with families and in groups, both educationally and therapeutically, will be studied.

3 credits

PSY 857 Infant / Toddler Assessment and Intervention

Course Description: This course considers infant and toddler assessment, including cognitive development, physical development, language and speech development, psychosocial development, and self-help skills. The issues of assessments in terms of developmental delay and at-risk will be addressed. In addition, early intervention services for infants and toddlers who are at-risk or developmentally delayed will be covered.

3 credits

PSY 860 Summer Full Time Pre-doctoral Internship

Course Description: This is a supervised full-time, predoctoral internship experience in a school or mental health facility. This field experience requires five days per week field work (eight hours per day for eight weeks). This full time, pre-doctoral internship is required by New York State for licensing as a psychologist.

Course Rotation: NY;Summer

0 credits

PSY 861 Full-Time Internship I

Prerequisite: Permission of Director of Field Training.

Course Description: This full time internship is required by New York State for licensing.

0 credits

PSY 862 Full Time Internship II

Course Description: This full-time internship is required by New York State of licensing.

0 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 861 Min Grade B

PSY 874 Group Interventions

Course Description: The course will focus on group interventions in psychological service delivery. The course will cover diverse methods and theories of group intervention.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 708 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 711 Minimum Grade of B and PSY 723 Minimum Grade of B

PSY 876 Multicultural and Gender Intervention Issues

Prerequisite: Admission to the Psy. D. Program.

Course Description: This course considers the range of multicultural and gender issues in the theory and practice of psychology. The focus is on sensitizing the practitioner to the impact of multicultural perspectives and gender differences in psychological assessment and intervention strategies with children, adolescents and families.

3 credits