ENS - Environmental Science

ENS 099 Concepts of Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: One year of undergraduate General Chemistry.

Course Description: This is an introductory course with emphasis on organic chemistry, including some biochemistry. This course is designed for students who may need undergraduate organic chemistry as a prerequisite for some graduate programs. The chemistry of organic compounds, hydrocarbons and their functional derivatives, stereochemistry, carbonyl containing compounds, structural analysis, and carbohydrates will be discussed.

0 credits

ENS 486 Research in Environmental Science

3 credits

ENS 494 Internship

3 credits

ENS 496 Current Topics in Environmental Science

2 credits

ENS 501 Environmental Assessment and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Preparation

Course Description: This course provides students with the skills to allow them to evaluate baseline site environmental conditions and to determine how these conditions will be impacted by various projects. Students will learn how to obtain environmental information and do field research. Environmental regulations that require the preparation of environmental impact statements will be discussed. Students will be presented with "real world" scenarios by environmental consultants, town planners and environmental lawyers. A class project will involve preparation of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement of a mock scenario.

4 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 610 Min Grade C and ENS 611 Min Grade C

ENS 505 Conservation Biology

This course is also open to undergraduate junior and senior level students with the permissions of the Biology department chairperson and the instructor.

Course Description: This course discusses the broad area of conservation in terms of biological principles and field and laboratory methods used in modern conservation biology. Current problems in conservation are also discussed.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade C or BIO 490 Min Grade D

ENS 506 Wildlife Ecology

Course Description:This course provides an overview of the field of wildlife ecology. Topics discussed include population ecology, dispersal, behavior, food resources, habitat resources, interspecies interactions, and sustainability.

Course Rotation: NY,PLV:Fall,Spring: Odd years

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B or BIO 490 Min Grade D

ENS 511 Plant Ecology and Conservation

3 credits

ENS 531 Biological Oceanography and Marine Biology

Course Description :This course is designed to present an overview of the fields of biological and chemical oceanography. Major biological, chemical, geological and physical features will be examined. This course will emphasize processes including primary production, carbon pumping and the function of the microbial loop, and those species that are associated with these processes in the ocean, as well as the biotic factors controlling those processes. It will also cover individual taxa and how they interact with these processes. The structure of marine food webs and the flow of energy within different marine habitats will be detailed and contrasted. The chemical and physical properties of the ocean such as thermohaline circulation, waves and tides will be discussed. The final segment in this class will introduce the student to the formation, biology, physiology and significance of coastal ecosystems. The relationship to global warming induced climate change will be discussed.

Course Rotation: NY:Fall, PLV:Fall

3 credits

ENS 600 Independent Study in Environmental Science

3 - 4 credits

ENS 610 Environmental Science I

Prerequisite: Undergraduate Basic Sciences.

Course Description: An interdisciplinary two-course sequence involving investigation of biological, chemical and physical processes of particular importance in dealing with environmental problems. Processes and interactions that include all earth systems involving terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric components will be covered in this course.

3 credits

ENS 611 Environmental Science II

Course Description: An interdisciplinary two-course sequence involving investigation of biological, chemical and physical processes of particular importance in dealing with environmental problems. Processes and interactions that include all earth systems involving terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric components will be covered in this course.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 610 Min Grade B

ENS 622 Quantitative Methods in Environmental Science

Course Description: This one semester lecture course focuses on improving the level of student understanding in quantitative analysis tools in environmental science. Students will survey principles of sampling methodology, testing protocols, analytical tools, data evaluation and statistics, as applied to environmental problems. This will prepare the students as leading scientists and researchers for their future career in Environmental Sciences. Demonstrations of experiments and exercises, with emphasis on environmental applications, will cover quantitative analytical methodologies such as titration, extraction, UV-VIS, Fluorescence, IR, AA, GC, HPLC, GC-MS, etc.

Course Rotation: PLV;Fall

4 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 624 Environmental Policy and Politics

Course Description:Understanding the complex adaptive systems of environmental impairment and protection is an interdisciplinary effort that converges in the study of environmental policy. This course examines environmental politics and its underlying ethical considerations with an emphasis on the American political system. Students will receive a broad introduction to key concepts, actors, stakeholders, and issues related to environmental policymaking. Course material focuses on the role of government organizations- at the federal, state, and local level- institutional processes, and nongovernmental entities. Throughout the semester, we will discuss substantive environmental policy issues, such as water and air pollution, waste and biodiversity; land us, climate change, and population. At the conclusion of the semester, students should have an understanding of the historical, cultural, institutional, and ideological forces shaping environmental policy and regulations in the United States.

3 credits

ENS 625 Environmental Science Communication

Course Description: This course is designed to instruct in and develop strategies for effective communication of scientific issues. It involves discussions of how to communicate science, both orally and in written form, to expert and audiences. This will include evaluation of case studies involving presentations that are considered to be effective and those that are not, and will provide guidelines on how to avoid pitfalls that afflict many public speakers on scientific issues. Students will prepare both oral and written reports that will be critiqued for effective communication.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 629 Topics in Marine Pollution

3 credits

ENS 630 Environmental Microbiology

4 credits

ENS 650 Environmental Law

Course Description: A survey of U.S. environmental laws and regulations as applied to public policy. Introduction to international environmental laws, as well as common law and procedural principles as they relate to environmental challenges. A framework for understanding environmental politics will be developed. The goal is to have the student appreciate certain principles of constitutional and administrative law as they relate to the reduction of environmental risk. Historical roots of environmental attitudes and values with economic and convenience factors in mind are introduced.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 651 Research Methods for Ecological Field Studies

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the manner by which biological data are collected, analyzed and reported for ecological field studies. The course will have both classroom and field components, and will explore areas such as territory and home range estimates, habitat evaluation, food habits, population viability analysis, population dynamics, GIS mapping, and genetic analyses.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall, odd years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 690I Topics: Molecular and Cellular Biology

Course Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to cellular metabolism, including the molecular aspects of synthesis and regulation in the cell. Recombinant DNA and concepts of genetic engineering will be considered.Molelcular biology as it applies to environmental issues will be presented.

3 credits

ENS 696D Graduate Ecology

Course Description: Ecology is the study of the distribution and abundance of organisms in the natural world and of the processes that generate these patterns. This course will cover fundamental ecological concepts from a theoretical and empirical perspective, at the level of individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, and the global environmental. We will study how energy and materials move through ecosystems, succession, interactions among organisms such as parasitism, predation, competition, and mutualism, learn how organisms have adapted to challenges posed by their physical environment and explore how interactions between organisms and their physical environment shape our natural world. Material in the textbook will be extensively supplemented with information from the original literature. Assigned articles will form the basis of in depth, student-led, discussions following lecture. During the semester, schedules permitting, we will attend one or more seminars at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York. A term paper is required.

3 credits

ENS 696I Water Commodity/Water Habitat

Course Description:Introduction to the professional discipline of ecosystem management where the sustainability of a resource, such as water, is threatened because of a conflict over its use. At odds is use of a resource as a market/public commodity versus use for sustaining an ecological habitat- i.e., satisfying a rising demand for a better environment (functions) while achieving reliable water supply/hydropower reliability (services), known as the twofold ecosystem management goal.

Course Rotation: PLV:Spring

3 credits

ENS 699 Special Topics in Environmental Science

Course Description: This course will review basic biochemical concepts related to enviromental issues. Specific studies will be discussed.

4 credits

ENS 730 Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology

Course Description: This course will explore the relationships between microorganisms and the environment. Emphasis will be given to the fundamentals of biotechnology, the significance of microorganisms in its development, and the increasing importance of genetically engineered microorganisms to the restoration and preservation of the environment.

4 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 731 Field Botany and Vegetation Analysis

Prerequisite:

Note: Some Saturday field trips may be required.

Course Description: Methods for the identification of the local flora will focus upon the species diganostic for specific ecosystems. Procedures for the analysis and description of vegetation will be described an utilized in the field.

4 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 630 Min Grade B

ENS 740 Environmental Toxicology and Pathology

Students must have completed an Undergraduate Biology and Chemistry course before registering for this class.

Course Description: The course deals with the basic and applied aspects of toxicology and pathology. It includes those principles most frequently invoked in a full understanding of toxicological events, such as dose-response relationships, and is primarily mechanistically oriented. An additional major focus is on the site of action of toxins. Toxic agents are grouped by chemical and/or use characteristics.

4 credits

ENS 760 Waste Management, Site Remediation and Land Reuse

Course Description: This course will investigate how public entities handle solid wastes as well as land that has been disturbed by former use. New York City will be the prime example of how a public entity manages their sold waste in an integrated solid waste management system. This class will explain the various solid waste management methods through the New York City example, and will develop their own solid waste management plan for a New York State Planning Unit. Also, there will be discussion of the current issues with redevelopment of sites that have been historically filled and cutting edge methods and requirements.

4 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 610 Min Grade B and ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 772 Thesis Preparation

Course Description : The course is designed to prepare students for work on their Master?s thesis. They will learn the objectives of and various steps involved with the thesis requirement. Discussion will include elements of a good written thesis and final oral defense.

Course Description : PLV:Spring, Fall

1 credits

ENS 780 Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

Course Description: This course provides students with the skills to allow them to evaluate baseline site environmental conditions and to determine how these conditions will be impacted by various projects. Students will learn how to obtain environmental information and do field research. Environmental regulations that require the preparation of environmental impact statements will be discussed. Students will be presented with "real world" scenarios by environmental consultants, town planners and environmental lawyers. A class project will involve preparation of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement of a mock scenario.

4 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 610 Min Grade B and ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 790 Environmental Science Seminar

Course Description: Each student will identify an interdisciplinary problem in environmental science, survey the published literature that deals with potential solution for the problem, and present an oral report to the group, with an emphasis on stimulating group discussion.

1 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 610 Min Grade B and ENS 611 Min Grade B

ENS 792 Research in Environmental Science I

Course Description: This is the required research course for all students in the program. Work may be laboratory or field-based. A thesis is required at completion of the research project.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ENS 793 Research in Environmental Science II

Course Description: This is an optional second half of a research course for students in the program. Work may be laboratory or field-based. A thesis is required at completion of the research project.

Course Rotation: PL: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 792 Min Grade B

ENS 798 Special Topics in Environmental Science

Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. Registration open to Environmental Science majors only.

Course Description: This course provides for an in depth analysis of a specific topic in the environmental sciences that is not part of the routine course offerings of the program or with in depth knowledge of a topic that was introduced in another course. The student will meet with the instructor on a regular basis to do independent library based research on the topic, and to develop at least one paper related to the subject matter of the course.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

1 - 3 credits

Prerequisites

ENS 611 Min Grade B