HIS - History

HIS 103 History of Western Civilization 1300-1815

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course covers the cultural contributions of the Renaissance, Reformation, and Counter Reformation. It examines the ages of discovery and of absolutism, the Enlightenment, the early scientific revolution, the background and events of the French Revolution, and ends with the age of Napoleon.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 104 History of Western Civilization 1815 to Present

Not open to students who have taken HIS 114M.

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course deals with the continuing efforts during the 19th and 20th centuries to establish new systems of world order to replace those destroyed in the age of the French Revolution. The course examines the growth of nationalism, liberalism, industrialization and the new imperialism, culminating in the two World Wars and the bi-polar, post-1945 world.

Course Rotation: NYC:TBA. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 107 World Civilization I

Required for Education and Social Science majors. Course Description: A general survey of world history; a study of the world's major cultural areas, their unique achievements and their interaction with and relation to other societies. Covers the period to the mid-17th century.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA ; PLV: F.

3 credits

HIS 108 World History After 1650

Required for Education and Social Science majors.

Course Description: A general survey of world history; a study of the world's major cultural areas, their unique achievements and their interaction with and relation to other societies. Covers the period from the mid-17th century.

Course Rotation: NYC:TBA; PLV: F.

3 credits

HIS 111 American Civilization to 1877

Not open to students who have taken HIS 113M: Early American Legacy.

Old Core: Only for students who have not studied American History in high school in the U. S. or for History/Education majors. Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: An examination of the social, political, and economic factors which have shaped American civilization. The course emphasizes the European background, the American Revolution and the building of a new nation, the emergent forces of nationalism, sectionalism, and westward expansion, the Civil War and the period of Reconstruction.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 112 American Civilization Since 1877

Required for Education majors.

Old Core: Fulfills Western History. Satisfies 3 credits toward American Studies major.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: A survey of political, social, and cultural developments in the United States since 1877, emphasizing the Populist and Progressive movements, the New Deal, and the role of the United States in international affairs.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 113 The American Experience: Changing Roles of Women

HIS 113B The American Experience: American Diversity, Immigration, Ethnicity and Race

Required for Education majors.

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: The U.S. is and always has been a nation of immigrants. This course studies American pluralism and diversity. It explores such topics as the push, pull, and means factors that have attracted and continue to attract millions of people to America; the interplay of race, ethnicity, class, and gender on the American political system, economy, and culture; the things that support or that oppose acceptance, assimilation, and socio-economic mobility of various ethnic and racial groups; and the aspirations, values, and experiences that unite Americans, as well as the social conflicts, prejudices, and fears of national fragmentation that arise in a heterogeneous nation.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall,Spring

3 credits

HIS 113C The American Experience: United States and the World - (CAP)

Course Description: This course provides a thorough understanding of why diversity has been, and continues to be, a major factor in American History. In chronological terms, the course will proceed from the circumstances surrounding the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the struggle over ratification of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution in the nineteen eighties.

3 credits

HIS 113E The American Experience: Dissent American History: Civil War to Present

Course Description: The United States was founded by people who were dissenters. The recognition of differences and the need to incorporate them in a constantly evolving society is written into our founding documents. Through the textbook and original documents this course will explore major political and social movements that were once considered radical and the times in which they arose. We will also examine how over time many of the demands of these movements have become part of the core values of the United States.

3 credits

HIS 113F The American Experience: The American Constitution and the Presidency

Old Core: Fulfills Western History. Satisfies 3 credits toward American Studies major. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course will examine themes in American History from the 1780s to the present through the Constitution and the Presidency. By the end of the course, students will be able to: 1) Identify the changing meaning and significance of individualism in United States presidential politics and 2) Discuss the major developments in Constitutional history in topics of limitations on power and protections of minorities.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring

3 credits

HIS 113H The American Experience: Lessons in Liberty: Promise and Reality

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: Through a study of documentary and literary sources related to specific topics, the course will examine how the idea of ?liberty? has developed and changed throughout the course of American history. Students will read, discuss and write about a wide variety of materials, including but not limited to political documents, speeches, political treatises, letters, biographies, newspaper articles and poetry, in an effort to understand what liberty has meant to others in the past and what it means to them today. Through frequent writing assignments, debates and class discussions, students will develop the critical thinking skills necessary to relate these documents both to the documents? historical context and to current national and international issues.

3 credits

HIS 113K The American Experience: The City and the Workplace

This course may be used towards NYC Studies Contemporary Minor. Old Core: Fulfills Exploratory/Western History. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course will focus on the political, economic, cultural, and social history of NYC from the colonial period to the consolidationof the five boroughs in 1898 asking the question and attempting to answer: How did NYC evolve into the place we now inhabit?

3 credits

HIS 113M The American Experience: The Early American Legacy

Not open to students who have taken HIS 111.
Old Core: Fulfills Western History. Satisfies 3 credits toward American Studies major. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course examines early America's society and culture as reflected by important political, economic, and military developments from the earliest Indian encounters with Europeans and Africans through the American Civil War with a focus on race, gender and class relations; capitalism; and competing religious and secular values.

3 credits

HIS 113R The American Experience: Changing Roles of American Women

Course Description: This course introduces students to the active participation of women in molding the nation?s history. The construct of gender norms and the changing assumptions about women and their place in society provides a central focal point. The experiences of women from diverse class, race, ethnic, and religious backgrounds etc. also will be considered.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall.

3 credits

HIS 113U The American Experience: The United States and the World

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course traces the transformation of the U.S. since World War I from an isolationist power, reluctant to form "entangling alliances" or interfere in international affairs outside the Western Hemisphere to the dominant world power. It will examine how and why this change occurred through U.S. participation in two World Wars and forty years of Cold War and what the consequences of that transformation have been for Americans at home and for world international relations.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 113W The American Experience: Wealth and American Culture

Not open to students who have taken HIS 111.
Old Core: Fulfills Western History. Satisfies 3 or 4 credits toward American Studies major.
New Core: Fulfills 3 or 4 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: An analysis of the accumulation and utilization of legendary American fortunes, with emphasis upon post- Civil War industrial fortunes: Gilded Age lifestyles: impact of the World Wars and Great Depression of the twentieth century: dot.com fortunes of the late twentieth century: paths to wealth in the twenty-first century; philanthropy.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 - 4 credits

HIS 114 The European Experience: All Themes

3 credits

HIS 114E The European Experience: The Age of the Renaissance

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course will focus on Italy and the Northern Monarchies from 1350-1550. Among the chief Renaissance values that diffused across Europe and remain part of the Western Heritage are social fluidity, civic and urban culture, learning and humanistic excellence, capitalism, and a global economy, and the application of wealth to stimulate learning and the arts.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall, Spring and Summer.

3 credits

HIS 114F The European Experience: The Holocaust: History and Legacy

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: More than fifty years later, the Holocaust remains one of the most compelling and horrible events in European history. How was it possible for the Nazis to exterminate most of Europe's Jewish population? What role did Adolph Hitler and other Nazi leaders play? How responsible were ordinary Germans for this tragic event? What was every day life in Nazi Germany like? This course will attempt to answer these and other questions.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 114M The European Experience: Ideas and the Modern State

Not open to students who have taken HIS 104. Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course examines intellectual, political, social and economic issues concerning the transformation to modernity in Europe and its consequences to the present day. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, nationalism, Fascism and Communism challenged freedom and equality and justified violence in new ways. Modern industrial techniques revolutionized warfare in "The Great War" from 1914-1918 and even more destructively, in World War II from 1939-1945. Since World War II, both domestic and international conditions - the Cold War, decolonization, immigration, the decline of Communism and economic globalization have provoked fresh debates among Europeans about the character of the modern State.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring

3 credits

HIS 114R The European Experience: Russia and Eastern Europe: Continuity and Change

Old Core: Fulfills Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: A survey course tracing the history of Russia and Eastern Europe from the 9th century to the present day, with a focus on Slavic civilization. Special attention is paid to questions of ethnic identities, nationalism, empire building, and revolution, especially with regard to the Russian Empire/Soviet Union. Students will be exposed to traditional and new approaches in history and area studies, including Marxist and Weberian interpretations, orientalism, colonialism and exploration, and the image of Russia in the West.

Course Rotation: NYC and PLV: Spring and Fall

3 credits

HIS 114S The European Experience: Church, State and Society in Medieval Europe

Old Core: Fulfills Western History. Satisfies 3 credits toward Classical and Medieval Studies minor.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course surveys the history of the Mediterranean region and Europe from ca. 300-1500 C.E. Topics include: the "fall" of the Roman Empire and foundation of Germanic kingdoms in Europe; the emergence of the Byzantine Empire; the rise of Islam; early medieval empires; feudal society; the Crusades; Europe's economic expansion after ca. 1050; cultural life and literature; universities; papal monarchy and religious dissent; and the problems of late Medieval Europe.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall

3 credits

HIS 114W The European Experience: The Ancient World

Old Core: Fulfills Western History. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course focuses on the history of the Near East and Mediterranean world between ca.3500 B.C.E. to ca.300 C.E. Topics include: The Ancient Near East; Minoan Crete; Mycenaean and Homeric Greece; the development of the Greek city-state; the Athenian Empire and the Peloponnesian War; Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age; the Roman Republic and Early Roman Empire; the spread of Christianity; and the Later Roman Empire.

3 credits

HIS 119 The Middle East: An Historical Survey

Satisfies 3 credits toward Middle Eastern Studies Minor. Old Core: Fulfills non-Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: After a survey of the medieval Arab world and the Ottoman Empire, the course focuses on political, social, economic and cultural developments in the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, and Iran. The Israeli-Arab conflict is emphasized.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring and Summer; PLV: Spring and Fall

3 credits

HIS 131 The Asian World: A Historical Survey

Satisfies 3 credits toward East Asian Studies Minor. Old Core: Fulfills non-Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: A survey of Asian history with the emphasis on the traditional Asian world order and modern transformations of the Asian societies under western impact.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 132 Africa: An Historical Survey

Satisfies 3 credits toward African and African-American Studies Minor. Old Core: Fulfills non-Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course covers modern African history from 1800 to the present, mainly in West, North, and South Africa. The focus is on the changes in culture from pre-colonial times in 1800 through the rise and decline of European colonialism, the successful independence movements, and the economic problems and successes of the post-independence period from 1960 to the present.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 133 Latin America: The Colonial Era

'Satisfies 3 credits toward Latin American Studies Minor.
Old Core: Enhancement Course.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III. Fulfills 3 credits Latin American Studies Minor/Certificate, Group B.

Course Description: This course begins with an overview of Spain and Portugal in the era before 1492 and continues with an analysis of the classic Amerindian civilizations of Mexico and Peru. It studies early Spanish administrative institutions established in the Caribbean and examines their transfer to the mainlands of North and South America. Developments in Portuguese Brazil during the same period will be surveyed. The Spanish mercantile system will be described as well as its collapse in the late 18-century, and the emergence of the first foci of the movements for independence.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 134 Modern Latin America

Satisfies 3 credits toward Latin American Studies Minor.
Old Core: Fulfills non-Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area Knowledge III.

Course Description: Historical, political, and economic survey of modern Latin America. Overview of the major countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, and Central America. Their development since 1870 will be analyzed, with emphasis on the period after 1900. The role of the region's economic and political dependence upon Europe and the USA, and of the U.S. as a key regional actor will be closely examined.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

HIS 134C Modern Latin America (CAP)

Course Description: Historical, political, and economic survey of modern Latin America. Overview of the major countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, and Central America. Their development since 1870 will be analyzed, with emphasis on the period after 1900. The role of the region's economic and political dependence upon Europe and the USA, and of the U.S. as a key regional actor will be closely examined.

3 credits

HIS 196

HIS 196B Developing a Historic Heritage Center in Lower Manhattan

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I.

Course Description: This course in public history (the interpretation of historical questions and issues to a non-academic audience through the use of tools such as oral history, film, exhibitions and performance) and in the history of Lower Manhattan focuses on the creation of a Heritage at Our Lady of the Rosary Church.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall

3 credits

HIS 196C History of Ancient and Medieval Africa

Satisfies 3 credits toward African and African-American Studies minor.
Old Core: Fulfills non-Western History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course will start with the arguments about the origins of man and African prehistory, and then discusses religion in Africa: traditional religions, Christianity and Islam. Other topics will include matrilineal societies, the medieval empires of Ghana, Mali and Songhay, archaeological findings, and the Transatlantic Slave Trade and creation of the African Diaspora. The founding of Modern South Africa in 1652 will also be introduced.

3 credits

HIS 196D Topic: Coping With Hard Times: Economic Downturns Throughout American History

Prerequisite: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II (Western Heritage).

Course Description: This course will use a historical perspective to explore the causes of economic downturns (whether they are called ?panics,? ?depressions,? or ?recessions? in the United States, and how the American people (at the government, business, and grass-roots levels) have responded to them.

Coure Rotation: Online: Summer.

3 credits

HIS 197C Ancient and Medieval African Studies

3 credits

HIS 201 The Building of England

Course Description: A survey of the growth of England's political and legal institutions and of her economic and social life from the Anglo-Saxon beginnings through the Revolution of 1688.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 202 Modern Britain

Course Description: A study of Great Britain in the modern period, surveying the political development of her empire and commonwealth, the Industrial Revolution, and constant economic and social adjustment.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 203 Rome's Golden Age: The Late Republic and Early Empire

Prerequisite: 3 credits of History. Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course examines one of the most turbulent and creative periods of Roman history, c. 146 B.C. to c. 68 A.D. Topics include: the effects of imperial expansion upon Roman society; the failure of the Gracchi to democratize the Roman Republic; slavery; the destruction of the Republic by ambitious generals like Julius Caesar; the establishment of an imperial government by Augustus; and the criminal insanity of the Julio-Claudians. The course will pay special attention to how the Romans perceived these traumatic events.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall, even years.

3 credits

HIS 205 The Crusades

Course Description:This course examines an important, but little understood, episode in European, Islamic, and Jewish history, the Crusades. Topics include: concepts of ?just war? and the religious importance of the Holy Land; the appearance of the Seljuk Turks in the eastern Mediterranean; Urban II, the First Crusade, and the establishment of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem; Saladin?s recovery of Jerusalem, and the Second and Third Crusades; the diversion of the Fourth Crusade to Constantinople; crusading in the 13th century; and crusading in Spain, southern France and the Baltic. This course will emphasize primary sources written by Christians, Muslims, and Jews in an effort to understand how medieval people perceived the Crusades then and now.

Course Rotation: NY:Spring

3 credits

HIS 206 European History: Witches, Wizards and the Rise of Scientific Thought

Course Description: The fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries produced some of the great intellectual milestones in European history: the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. Yet during this same period, Europeans also became increasingly fascinated with (or terrified of) magic and the occult. This fascination manifested itself in witchcraft hysteria among the general population, as well as in an interest in the study of divination, astrology and alchemy among the intellectual elite. This course will examine the social, cultural, political and economic trends which produced this apparent dichotomy, and seek to identify those forces which ultimately led to victory of science over magic.

Course Rotation: PL: Spring

3 credits

HIS 207 Europe Since World War I

Course Description: This course examines the European nations and cultures which came out of the first World War, including: the emergence and growth of conflicting ideologies during the 1920's and 1930's; Modernism and mass culture; the great depression, the rise of fascism and the breakdown of international order; World War II and the Holocaust; existentialism and other intellectual and artistic movements; Europe and the cold war; decolonialization; the feminist and student movements of the 1960's; the creation of the common market; the growth of the welfare state and its dismantling; and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring

3 credits

HIS 209 Israel and Palestine: The Heritage and the Challenge

Satisfies 3 credits toward Middle Eastern Studies Minor.

Course Description: After a survey of the history of Zionism and Arab nationalism, this course focuses on the creation of the state of Israel and reaction of the Arabs at various stages, leading up to the demand for an independent state of Palestine. Topics include the Mandate, the establishment of the State of Israel, the Arab/Israeli wars, Jewish immigration and absorption, Arabs in Israel, the formation of the PLO and opposition groups, religious fundamentalism, and economic considerations. A special focus will be on the ongoing peace process and the development of Palestine.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring; PLV: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 210 Germany and Central Europe Since 1848

New Core: Fulfills 3 Credits In Area Of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course surveys the history of German-speaking Europe since the mid-19th century. It will examine the history of Austria up through 1918; the revolution of 1848 and the wars of German unification; the rapid social and economic development of Germany in the late 19th century; and cultural or ideological movements which emerged in German-speaking Europe during this period (e.g., socialism, feminism, Freudianism). The course also emphasizes developments after WWI: the growth of national socialism; how the Nazis came to control the German government in 1933; daily life in Nazi Germany; WWII; and the Holocaust.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 213 Modern Russia

Course Description: A survey of the main political, diplomatic, economic, social and cultural developments in Russia since 1860.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 215 American Social and Cultural History

3 credits

HIS 216 History of Human Rights

Course Description: Since the end of WWII, social and political movements around the world have articulated their messages around the concepts of rights. This course is an inquiry about the historical development of the norms, processes and institutions for the international human rights movement. It looks at the process by which international legal rules have been made or elaborated. The course examines the historical confrontation between the human rights concept and the notions of national sovereignty, domestic jurisdictions, and cultural autonomy. It also examines the historical development of the monitoring institutions within the United Nations and the human rights non-governmental organizations. The aim is to show the United Nations' strength and weakness. It finally looks at the dual or contradictory role played by the U.S. government in the development of the international human rights movement.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall; PLV: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 217 Modern East Asia in Film

Course Description: Using films produced by Chinese, Japanese and Korean directors, this course discusses the cinematic representations of history as event, experience and myth in modern East Asia.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall.

3 credits

HIS 218 Nonviolent Activism in Modern Asia

Old Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in World Traditions and Cultures.

Course Description: Nonviolence has long been used as an effective strategy for opposing Western imperialism, pursuing democracy and justice, creating social and political change, and resolving domestic and global conflicts in the 20th century Asia. The best examples are Mohandas Gandhi in India, Dalai Lama in Tibet, Aung San Suu Kyi in Burma, and the Tiananmen pro-democracy student movement in China. Through a critical study of documentary sources and a series of interactive ?games,? this course explores the philosophy, tactics, and outcomes of nonviolent struggles in modern Asia from historical, comparative and cross-cultural perspectives.

Course Rotation:NY;Fall

3 credits

HIS 220 Modern Islamic World: 1850-Present

Formerly HIS 297A. Satisfies 3 credits toward Middle Eastern Studies Minor.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course will deal with modern developments in the entire Islamic world - from China, South, Central, and Southeast Asia to the Middle East, Africa, and in Europe and America. Topics will include the role of Islam in the history of Indonesia, Malaysia, Afghanistan, and Pakistan as well as in the Arab world, Turkey and Iran; Islamic fundamentalism and issues of modernization; terrorism, the Arab-Israeli conflict; and the current situation in Iraq.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, Summer.

3 credits

HIS 223 Discrimination, Integration and Assimilation: Global Jewish Experience

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.



Course Description: Issues of discrimination, persecution, tolerance, assimilation and integration in pluralistic societies are faced by many peoples, whether members of a "universal minority" such as the Jews, or a local minority in a given region or country. They must be understood in their historical context. Through an examination of the Jewish experience throughout the world, this course looks at what it means to be the "Other".

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA

3 credits

HIS 225 The World of the Middle Ages: Byzantium

Satisfies 3 credits toward Middle Eastern Studies Minor.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: Economic, social, religious, political history of the eastern Mediterranean states from the fourth to the 15th centuries. The major problems considered include the dissolution of the Roman imperial system, the development of the Byzantine Empire, the expansion and impact of Islam, the spread of Orthodoxy, the Crusades, the decline of the Byzantine world and the emerging Balkan and Turkish states.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 226 The World of the Middle Ages: The West

Course Description: This course examines the history of the high Middle Ages, ca. 900-ca. 1300 A.D., focusing on western Europe. The course will examine the creation of stable political structures as the age of migrations ended; the expansion of Europe's internal and external frontiers; religious reform movements; European contacts and confrontations with Byzantium and Islam; the growth of cities and urban society; the development of schools and universities; the challenge of Greek, Muslim, and Jewish philosophy; courtly culture, chivalry, and romanticism; popular piety, asceticism, and heresy; the development of the "secular state"; papal monarchy; and unresolved tensions within medieval society. Emphasis will be placed on the reading of a variety of primary sources from this creative period.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall.

3 credits

HIS 227J Topic: The Crusades

3 credits

HIS 231 Latin America: Century of Social Change and Revolution

Course Description: This course examines the unique experience of Central and South America, together with the Caribbean nations, over the last century. Violent social and political revolution has dominated Latin America since its attainment of political independence. Accordingly, the related themes of social change and revolution; economic underdevelopment and political upheaval will receive major focus. A case study comparative approach may be used to scrutinize selected countries. Church-state and military influence and the dominance of the United States in diplomatic and economic relations will be seen in balance with the region's emergence on the world stage.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall

3 credits

HIS 232 Caribbean America

The course studies an area unique in its physical and historical relationship to the United States. The historical background of the United States¨ economic penetration is traced. The political and social development of the more important Caribbean countries is discussed, along with an assessment of their chances for stable political, social, and economic growth.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA

3 credits

HIS 234 South American Colossus: The History of Modern Brazil

3 credits

HIS 239 Wars in the Asia-Pacific

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course examines the relations between total wars and state-building in the Asia-Pacific region throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

Course Rotation: NY: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 241 Modern China

Prerequisite: 3 credits of History or equivalent learning community or topics course. Satisfies 3 credits toward Asian Studies minor. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: Study of China in the 19th and 20th centuries. Unequal treaties. Opium War. Decline of the Manchu Dynasty. U.S. and European relations with China. War lords. Sun Yat Sen and Chiang Kai-shek. World War I and II. Rise of communism. Korean and Vietnam Wars. Relations with Taiwan.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring -. PLV: Fall and Spring

3 credits

HIS 242 Modern Japan

Satisfies 3 credits toward East Asian Studies minor.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: A study of Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries. Feudal period. Shogunate. Coming of Perry. Imperial rule. Meiji Era: from feudalism to industrial age. Liberal aspects. Imperialism: Sino-Japanese War, Russo-Japanese War, World War II, General MacArthur, and SCAP Peace Treaty and after.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring; PLV: Fall

3 credits

HIS 243 Service and Study in Latin America

Satisfies 3 credits in History and 3 credits in Latin American Studies (Group D) certificate program.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I (Service Learning Component). or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Updated Course Description: This course combines academic study of the history, politics, social structure and economic development of Venezuela with travel and a communitarian service learning experience. Reading, discussions, films and guest speakers will be followed by 1 to 2 weeks of travel and voluntary labor in Venezuela. The venue of service learning will be a public educational, health, nutrition or multi-service agency.

Travel Course Description: This course combines travel and service learning with weekly seminars at Pace?s Downtown campus. Seminar study will examine Venezuela from a multi-disciplinary perspective, including history, ethnic makeup and culture, economic development and social issues. Guest experts will explore pertinent social, economic and cultural issues. Hands-on workshops will prepare the class for culture shock, team building and civic engagement. During the inter-cession (May) period, the class travels to Venezuela. The travel experience will include visits to cultural and historical sites together with several days of service consisting of teaching basic English to primary school children in one of Caracas' poorest neighborhoods. Spanish is not required, but knowledge of it will enhance your experience.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 256 American Colonial History

Course Description: The background of European beginnings, with the emphasis on the contribution of the old world to the new. In addition to the normal chronological treatment of colonial development, there is a special focus on the unique institutional developments of Massachusetts and Virginia as extremes in the colonial pattern. The concluding part of the course covers the economic, social, and intellectual background of the American Revolution.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA

3 credits

HIS 259 The American Revolution

Course Description: This course will examine the creation of an American nation out of thirteen colonies from 1763 to 1789 and the limits of that creation. Topics include the social, economic and political roots of colonial resistance to British power, the decisions for revolution and independence, the rise and fall of the confederation and the creation of the Constitution. Special attention will be devoted to historical decision-making during critical moments of the revolution, such as the Second Continental Congress of 1775-1777, and writing and ratification of the Constitution in 1787-88.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA

3 credits

HIS 260 Constitutional History of the United States

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: After a study of the historical and philosophical background of the Constitution, selected topics are analyzed to illustrate the development of the Constitution through judicial interpretation. Recent court decisions involving federalism, judicial review, and civil rights are also discussed. Recommended for pre-law students.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall - Odd years. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 262 Back to the Future: Developing a Historical Heritage Center in Lower Manhattan

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I. Service Learning.

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce content areas consisting of public history, New York City history and the study of history museums while also presenting a community-based learning component that directly connects to the academic content of the course and contributes to the creation of Heritage Hall. Material will be explored through lectures, readings, field trips and discussions. Coordinated with these academic-content areas will be an immersion in a dimension of public history through a special semester-long project at Our Lady of the Rosary Church and Seton Shrine located at 7 State Street that also is known as the James Watson House.

Course Rotation: NY: Spring.

3 credits

HIS 264 History of the American Presidency 1900 - Present

Course Description: This course traces the development of the Presidency from William McKinley to Barack Obama. In addition to analyzing the development of the Presidential office itself, the course will also examine the evolving roles and public expectations of the Presidency.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring

3 credits

HIS 265 American Urban History

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course will deal with the process of urbanization during the 20th century. An in-depth analysis will include the following: the impact of industry and technology; the urban environment, housing, and homelessness; "inner cities" and the role of government in resolving urban problems.

Course Rotation: PLV: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 267 Heroes, Villains and Just Plain Folks: A Biographical Perspective on American History

Course Description: Utilizing excerpts from acclaimed biographies of recent years, plus chapters from respected biographies which have stood the test of time, supplemented by a series of documentaries and an occasional docudrama, this course will explore the role of individuals in shaping the American nation. The motivation, preparation, accomplishments and misdeeds of figures, both illustrious and infamous, will be explored. In addition to political and military figures, e.g. Abigail Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Benedict Arnold, Aaron Burr, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Richard Nixon, the course will include figures involved in westward expansion, e.g. Sam Houston, Kit Carson, scientists, inventors, and entrepreneurs, e.g. Thomas Edison and Sarah Breedlove Walker, and individuals associated with the civil rights and other movements of the twentieth century, e.g. Martin Luther King. Throughout the course the instructor, whose book Silent Builder: Emily Warren Roebling and the Brooklyn Bridge has elicited comments and queries from the BBC and American film producers, will share personal insights on the intellectual and creative challenges associated with writing a biography.

3 - 4 credits

HIS 268 American Labor History

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: The course will trace the rise of the labor movement from the colonial period to the present. The emphasis will be on the late 19th and 20th century development. Problems facing unions since 1945 will be explored and analyzed.

3 credits

HIS 269 Recent United States History

Course Description: A detailed examination of political, economic, social and cultural developments in the United States from 1945 to the present. Some topics considered are: the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, Radicalism of the right, the new left, the Vietnam War, the Nixon Era, the impact of Ronald Regan and trends at the end of the century.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall- Odd Years; PLV: TBA

3 credits

HIS 270 History of Modern South Africa

New Core: Fulfills 3 Credits in Area of Knowledge II

Course Description: History of Modern South Africa investigates the historical origins of modern South Africa. Were the original founders the Dutch East India Company in 1652 or the Bantu-speakers who arrived supposedly in 1500 A.D.? The course also traces South African history from the Cession of the Cape in 1806; the Great Trek in 1836; the gold and diamond rushes, 1868-1890; the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902; the formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910; the victory of the National Party in 1948; the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960; the release of Nelson Mandela in 1990; the dismantling of apartheid in 1991; the new constitution of 1999 and the new government under President Thabo Mbeki

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA

3 credits

HIS 271 Culture and History of Black America

Satisfies 3 credits toward African and African-American Studies Minor.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course surveys African-American History from 1619 to present. The social history of Black America under slavery and in the post-Civil War years is emphasized. Shifting Black leadership from the Reconstruction period through the post-Civil Rights era is studied. We shall explore the manner in which the African-American experience has inspired citizens of Third World countries to undertake peaceful change.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall - Even years. PLV: Fall - Odd years.

3 credits

HIS 273 Ethnic and Racial History of the United States

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II. Satisfies 3 credits toward NYC Studies minor. Not open to students who have taken HIS 113B.

Course Description: This course traces the history and culture of American ethnic and racial minorities from the colonial era to the present. Using historical texts, essays, memoirs and novels, it explores the interplay of race, ethnicity, class and gender in shaping America?s politics, economy, social structure, and the lives, conflicts, values and experiences of individual Americans.

3 credits

HIS 274 History of North Africa After 1800

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III. Satisfies 3 credits towards African and African American Studies minor.

Course Description: History of North Africa after 1800 focuses on the history of the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia), Libya and Egypt from 1800 to present. It emphasizes the diversity of Berber, Islamic, and African cultures and the imposition of and reaction to European colonialism. It also explores North African social, religious, and political movements and their effect on west and central Sudan, and most recently, on world politics. The course is unusual in that it emphasizes that North Africa has an historical identity independent of Middle Eastern, African, or European History.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

HIS 119 Min Grade D or HIS 132 Min Grade D

HIS 275 Modern History of Afghanistan, Iraq and Iran

Course Description:The countries of Afghanistan, Iraq, and Iran have been the central focus of American foreign policy in the past decade. This course will provide a geographic, social, cultural, political and economic survey of the modern history of all three countries. We will examine the trajectory each nation followed in becoming a modern state including the critical role of oil, political Islam, superpowers, and imperialism in shaping each of their histories in the 20th and 21st centuries. The class will focus especially on the watershed political events in each country since 1970?s, and especially 1979, the rise to power of Saddam Hussein, the Iranian revolution of 1978-79, and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 up through the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Course Rotation:NY:Spring

3 credits

HIS 280 History of American Women

New Core: Fulfills 3 Credits in Area of Knowledge II

Course Description: This course presents an in-depth analysis of the history of American women. Topics covered include the following: role of gender, the struggle for suffrage, the formation of women¨s institutions, issues of equity and equality, the second Women's Movement, feminist ideology and issues of diversity.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA; PLV: TBA

3 credits

HIS 281 European Women and Social Change

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II. Fulfills 3 credits towards Women Studies minor.

Course Description: This course examines a variety of topics in European women's history since 1700, focusing particularly on the results of recent research in this field. We will discuss such topics as: the impact of industrialization and class formation on European concepts of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality; masculine "honor" and duels in the 19th century; work roles assigned to men and women in the factory and the family; gender and the rise of mass consumer culture in the 20th century; women and the European welfare state; and women in Eastern European socialist societies.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 296

HIS 296A Barbarians and Mandarins: China’s Inner Asian Frontiers

3 credits

HIS 296B Topic: Modern East Asia in Film

(NYC)
3 credits

HIS 296E Topic: Tolstoy, Turks and Taliban: Russia's "Orient"

Prerequisite: 3 credits in History. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course is designed as an in depth study of the building of the Russian Empire in Asia since the late 16th century. Special attention will be paid to the dynamics of imperialism, colonialism and inter-cultural exchange in the frontier settings of Central Asia and Siberia. The geographical scope of the course will not be limited to areas completely incorporated into the Russian/Soviet state, but will extend also to claimed and realized spheres of influence in South and East Asia.

3 credits

HIS 296F Samurai Images Past and Present

3 credits

HIS 296I Cultural Heritage and Service Learning in Inner Asia

3 credits

HIS 296K Consuming Desires: Mass Production, Advertising and Consuming Desires in Modern Europe

Prerequisite: Three credits in History.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course discusses the development of industrial consumer cultures in Europe since the late eighteenth century. Topics covered will include: proto-industrialization and the development of the factory system; changes in the retail distribution system; the impact of colonial products on the European market; the development of modern advertising and popular commercial recreations; and the role that consumer politics played in 20th century European political systems (e.g., against the backdrop of the Cold War). The readings discuss these topics within several European nations, including Germany, France, Britain, Russia, and Italy.

Course Rotation: NYC: TBA

3 credits

HIS 296U Bible and Gun: Christianity in China Since 1500

3 credits

HIS 296V History of the Vietnam War

3 credits

HIS 296Y Topic: History of Non-Violent Activism in Modern Asia

Satisfies 3 credits toward East Asian Studies Minor. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.


Course Description: Non-violence has been used by political leaders in 20th-century Asia to oppose Western colonialism, pursue democracy and justice, and resolve domestic and international conflicts. Mohandas Gandhi (India), Dalai Lama (Tibet), Aung San Suu Kyi (Burma), and civilians in Tiananmen Square (China) are the best examples. This course explores the history of non-violent activism across Asia from historical and comparative perspectives.

Course Rotation: NYC:Spring- Even Years

3 credits

HIS 297

HIS 297B Witches, Wizards and the Rise of Scientific Thought from Renaissance to the Englightenment.

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: The fifteenth trhough the eighteenth centuries produced some of the great intellectueal milestones in European history: the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. Yet during this same period, Europeans also became increasingly fascinated with (or terrified of) magic and the occult. This fasination manifested itself in witchcraft hysteria among the general pppulation, as well as in an interest in the study of divination, astology and alchemy among the intellectual elite. This course will examine the social, cultural, political and economic trends which produced this apparent dichotomy, and seek to identify those forces which ultimately led to victory of science over magic.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring

3 credits

HIS 297C Topic: Rome's Golden Age: The Late Republic and Early Empire

Prerequisite: 3 credits of History. Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course examines one of the most turbulent and creative periods of Roman history, c. 146 B.C. to c. 68 A.D. Topics include: the effects of imperial expansion upon Roman society; the failure of the Gracchi to reform the Roman Republic; the destruction of the Republic by ambitious generals like Julius Ceasar; the establishment of an imperial government by Augustus; and the criminal insanity of the Julio-Claudians. The course will pay special attention to social issues of wealth and poverty, slavery, the liberation of aristocratic women from traditional roles, changes in education and Roman perceptions of the traumatic events of this revolutionary period.

3 credits

HIS 297D Topic: Wars in the Asia-Pacific

Satisfies 3 credits toward East Asian Studies Minor. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course focuses on the relations between modern warfare and state-making in the Asia-Pacific throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It studies the outbreak of total wars, the militarization of local societies, the emergence of strong and modern states, and the local reactions to the U.S. pursuit of hegemony in the post-1945 era. It also explores the geopolitical, environmental impacts of local, regional and international warfare across the Asia-Pacific. Major topics include the American takeover of the Philippines, the Second World War in Asia, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the nuclear proliferation in Northeast and South Asia, and the U.S.-China strategic competition at the turn of the 21st century.

3 credits

HIS 297E Topic: Islamic Social and Cultural History to 1850

Satisfies 3 credits toward Middle Eastern Studies Minor. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This course will examine the socio-cultural trends and economic currents that have shaped Middle Eastern history since the advent of Islam. We will discuss issues such as the context in which the prophet Muhammad arose, tolerance in early Islam, the golden age of science, art and scholarship, economic and commercial success until 1500, the causes of the decline of society since the sixteenth century, and the significance of the Islamic system to the common people, merchants, religious circles, scholars, literary and scientific groups. Islam in North and East Africa and South and Southeast will be discussed.

3 credits

HIS 297F Topic: Of Swords and Cherry Blossoms: Samurai Images Past and Present

Satisfies 3 credits toward East Asian Studies Minor. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: The course explores the history of the samurai as warrior, noble, official, and most importantly, pivotal figure in the construction of a Japanese national "mythistory." The focus is on the study of medieval and early modern texts and images, as well as of nineteenth/twentieth century popular books and feature films dealing with samurai as people, concept, and ideal.

3 credits

HIS 297G Topic: Afghanistan, Iraq and Iran

Satisfies 3 credits toward Middle Eastern Studies Minor. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: In this course, the modern histories of Afghanistan, Iran and Iraq - three countries that share ethnicity, religion, and history - will be examined. The political history of the three states is preceded by a review of their ethnic and religious make-up. These states have played a pivotal role in the contemporary world Islamic upheaval and the current international terrorism. As a result, two of the three have already been occupied by US forces, and the third, Iran might follow soon. An examination of the American aims and goals in these three countries and the Middle East-Central Asia-Caucasus region as a whole will conclude the course.

3 credits

HIS 297H Topic: The Crusades

Satisfies 3 credits of Classical and Medieval Studies minor.
New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course examines an important, but little understood episode in European, Islamic, and Jewish history, the Crusades. Topics include: concepts of a "just war" and the religious importance of the Holy Land; the appearance of the Seljuk Turks in the eastern Mediterranean; Urban II, the First Crusade, and the establishment of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem; Saladin's recovery of Jerusalem, and the Second and Third Crusades; the diversion of the Fourth Crusade to Constantinople; crusading in the thirteenth century; crusading in Spain, southern France and the Baltic. This course will emphasize primary sources written by Christians, Muslims, and Jews in an effort to understand how people perceived the Crusades then and now.

3 credits

HIS 297J Topic: The Silk Road- Eurasian Cultural Exchange and Early Globalization

Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III. Satisfies 3 credits toward History major or minor, and East Asian Studies minor.

Course Description: The course is designed as an in-depth study of the cultural and technological exchange that linked the great civilizations of the Eurasian landmass in the first millennium CE and beyond. Special attention will be paid to the dynamics of trade, conquest, center-periphery relations and ecological factors in the frontier settings of Central Asia. The geographical scope of the course will not be limited only to the oasis societies of the actual trade routes but will include the nomadic and sedentary empires facilitating the exchange of goods and ideas as well.

3 credits

HIS 297K Consuming Desires: Mass Production, Advertising, and the Development of Consumer Cultures in Modern Europe

6 credits

HIS 297K Topic: Europe in the Enlightenment and Revolutionary Era

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: The course will treat economic, social, intellectual developments of the enlightenment and revolutionary era. The course will be concerned with problems of the rise of consumption and sensibility in the eighteenth century such as ideas of Voltaire or the marriage of Figaro.

3 credits

HIS 297L Topic: The American Civil War

Course Description: Lincoln described the Civil War as ?fundamental and astounding? while attempting to justify its costs by promising a ?new birth of freedom.? No other single event has affected American history more, and in more different ways. Yet the issues surrounding the American Civil War?s causes, its fighting, and its aftermath are faced by dozens of nations around the world today. Sectional conflict, racial and ethnic oppression, nationalism, and the meaning of democracy (and for whom) are but some of the questions America faced in the mid-19th century and will be explored not only in the specific context of our Civil War but also with a comparative international perspective in this Learning Community.

3 credits

HIS 297M Topic: History of the American Environment

Course Description: This course will examine the whole sweep of how Americans have regarded their lands and waters, how government has come to play the key role in protecting the environment and conserving natural resources, what the science and practice of public health have meant, and how politics has influenced and been influenced by the environmental movement. The textbook will be A Fierce Green Fire by Philip Shabecoff, veteran environmental journalist, editor, and author. The textbook will be supplemented with readings from Emerson, Thoreau, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, John McPhee, Barry Commoner, Bill McKibben, and Elizabeth Kolbert, among others. There will be two 3-5 page papers, and a 12-15 page final paper, as well as some quizzes. Class discussion will be an integral part of the course.

3 credits

HIS 302 African-American History Since 1910

Prerequisite: 3 credits of History or equivalent learning community/Interdisciplinary or topics course. Satisfies 3 credits toward African and Africa-America Studies Minor.

Course Description: The course is a survey of the major historical events which shaped the lives of African-Americans in the United States starting with the Great Migration to the North around 1914 and ending with the end of the century events, such as the inclusion of African-Americans into major national institutions of leadership. The course is oriented toward research and discussion of topics in social history. Some of the issues covered are labor policies toward African-Americans during the twentieth century; the work of the major civil rights organizations including the NAACP, the Urban League, CORE, SCLC, and SNCC in charting social change; the history of black feminist thought; African-American participation in World War I and World War II, Korea and Vietnam; integration versus black nationalism; and the 1990's crisis of black leadership as analyzed by Cornel West, John White, and Stephen F. Lawson.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

HIS 310 United States in the Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1929-1945

Prerequisite: 3 credits in History.

Course Description: This course focuses on one of the most critical periods of the twentieth century. It covers the stock market crash; the Great Depression and its impact on American society; the Relief, Recovery, and Reform measures of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal; the rising fascist threat and America's response; Pearl Harbor; World War II on the home front, the battlefields, and the summit conferences of Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin; and the birth of the United Nations and the nuclear age.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall - Even years.

3 credits

HIS 321 Economic History of the US

3 credits

HIS 325

HIS 330 Barbarian Europe: 300 - 1000 A.D.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of History. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Course Description: This course covers the period from ca. 300 to ca. 1000 A.D. The course examines the disintegration of the Roman Empire; the occupation of its western provinces by various Germanic tribes; the Roman Emperor Justinian's attempted re-conquest of the lost western provinces; the expansion of Islam and the breakdown of the unity of Mediterranean civilization; the emergence of the Frankish kingdom in northwestern Europe as the self-proclaimed heir of Rome's imperial tradition; the rise of the Carolingian Empire under Charlemagne; the connection between religion and imperialism; the breakup of the Carolingian empire due to aristocratic resistance to imperial absolutism, a localized economy, and renewed invasion; and the new political forms which emerged in Europe as the Carolingian empire collapsed.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

HIS 340 Chinese Cultural Tradition

3 credits

HIS 366 History of New York City

Prerequisite: 3 credits in History. This course satisfies 3 credits toward the NYC Studies minor.

Course Description: The growth of New York City from a Dutch colonial outpost to the world's financial, cultural, and communications capital is traced. Political and economic developments of the colonial, early national, and post-Civil War, as well as problems of greater New York since 1898 and problems of the future are given particular emphasis.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

HIS 111 Min Grade D or HIS 112 Min Grade D

HIS 367 History and Geography of New York

Prerequisite: 3 credits in History or equivalent Learning Community/Interdisciplinary or topics course. Satisfies 3 credits toward NYC Studies Concentration/Minor. Required for education majors.

Course Description: This course deals with the history and geography of the Empire State. Topics will include: topography, waterways, natural resources, geography and the economy of New York, Native Peoples, colonial settlement patterns, New York in the American Revolution, New York as the nation's first capital, 19th century transportation innovations: canals, steamboats, railroads; industrialization, 20th century New York: suburbanization, urban decay and renewal, the post-industrial age, environmental challenges, New York State government.

Course Rotation:: NYC: Spring; PLV: Spring and Fall

3 credits

HIS 380 Seminar on Historiography

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and 3 credits of History. Required for History majors. Recommended for History minors.

Course Description: Students will read a variety of historical works in order to understand the sources of historical knowledge and modes of historical expression. Students will become acquainted with a wide variety of techniques and analytical tools developed by historians. Students will examine debates among historians on major issues within the discipline and analyze the complex relationship between the past and the present in historical writing.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall; PLV: Fall

3 credits

HIS 391 History Internship

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 3 credits of History or equivalent learning community/Interdisciplinary or topics course. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I.

Course Description: Students will work at least eight hours per week at an internship based either in a museum or other cultural institution, a government agency, a court, or a public interest law firm. Combined with a weekly seminar that explores the history and purpose of such institutions, the course will provide students with valuable work experience in venues dedicated to serving the public good. Students interested in careers in these fields will be able to use the internship to help clarify their goals. In addition to the internship and the seminar. The course requires weekly entries in a journal and a final paper.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

HIS 395 Independent Study in History

PREREQUISITE: Junior standing and minimum CQPA of 3.00. With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, the department chairperson, and the academic dean, students may select a topic for guided research that is not included in the regular course offerings. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or paper must also be submitted.

Course Rotation: All Campuses: Fall, Spring, and Summer

1 - 9 credits

HIS 499 Senior Year Experience in History

Course Description: Each student will select a topic and write a research paper under the direction of the seminar instructor. The seminar's instructor will guide each student through the process with the help of a second consultant with expertise in the appropriate field. The class will meet on a regular basis to discuss work in progress and share insights into the nature of historical research.

3 credits

Prerequisites

HIS 380 Min Grade D