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DCS - Doctoral Computing Studies

DCS 801 Software Design and Implementation I

Course Description: The object-oriented software development process is examined through the design and implementation of a team project. Design will be documented in the Unified Modeling Language and implemented in Java. Cutting-edge software design methodologies will be discussed and evaluated. Design patterns will be explored. Software layered architectures will be examined. Class discussion will center on abstraction, data structures and algorithms, software architectures, and software metrics and models.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 803 Software Design and Implementation III

Course Description: The third and final part of the course will focus on advanced technical issues. Persistence, concurrency, tools, component software, advanced development methodology, client-server computing, and networks and distributed applications will be explored using a team project approach. Other topics might include the application of artificial intelligence, genetic algorithms and other promising technologies to business problems.

2 - 3 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 801 Min Grade C

DCS 811 Application on Database Systems Development, Design and Implementation I

Course Description: This course addresses the environment in which application systems are built and used. Critical and emerging issues in computing and their relationship to application database design and provide the major theme. This includes Internet computing and component technologies, and the development of significant Web-based e-education applications with a back end database.

Course Rotation: WP: Fall.

2 - 4 credits

DCS 812 Application on Database Systems Development, Design and Implementation II

Course Description: This is the second course in a two course database and systems analysis sequence. This course further expands the student's understanding of the environment in which application systems are built and used. Critical and emerging issues in computing and their relationship to application database design and provide the major scheme. This includes Internet computing and component technologies, and the development of significant Web-based e-education applications with a back end database.

Students will further develop projects working in small teams that directly relate to the educational environment. In addition, the concepts of data visualization and data-driven decision making will be explored. The project development explores cutting edge Web Design and data analysis, tool rich working environments, team development efforts, cost performance trade-offs in an educational context.

Course Rotation: WP: Fall.

2 - 4 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 811 Min Grade C

DCS 821 Software Development and Engineering I

Course Description: These courses address the environment in which software systems are built and used. Critical and emerging issues in computer science, information systems and software engineering and their relationship to software development and design provide the major theme. Students develop a substantial project working in small teams. The project development explores cutting edge object-oriented development methodologies such as extreme programming (XP), open source, and mob software, and is implemented in Java. Pattern-oriented software architecture as an approach to software development is explored. Emphasis is on practice-oriented software engineering and information systems, and is representative of the real-world environment with which practicing computer professionals interact - tool-rich working environments, team development efforts, cost performance trade-offs in business contexts, and expenditure of considerable effort on tasks other than source-code development. Topics include: Problem solving paradigms; the software engineering problems of scale, cost, schedule, quality and consistency; software development process; requirements; object-oriented analysis and design; organizational patterns; analysis patterns, design patterns; object-oriented architectures; process improvement - CMM, ISO 9001; quality assurance; human-computer-interface design issues; Internet programming; computer ethics.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 823 Systems Development and Analysis III

Course Description: These courses address the environment in which software systems are built and used. Critical and emerging issues in computer science, information systems and software engineering and their relationship to software development and design provide the major theme.Students develop a substantial project working in small teams. The project development explores cutting edge object-oriented development methodologies such as extreme programming (XP), open source, and mob software, and is implemented in Java. Pattern-oriented software architecture as an approach to software development is explored. Emphasis is on practice-oriented software engineering and information systems, and is representative of the real-world environment with which practicing computer professionals interact - tool-rich working environments, team development efforts, cost performance trade-offs in business contexts, and expenditure of considerable effort on tasks other than source-code development.Topics include: Problem solving paradigms; the software engineering problems of scale, cost, schedule, quality and consistency; software development process; requirements; object-oriented analysis and design; organizational patterns; analysis patterns, design patterns; object-oriented architectures; process improvement - CMM, ISO 9001; quality assurance; human-computer-interface design issues; Internet programming; computer ethics.

2 - 3 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 821 Min Grade C

DCS 833 Data Communication and Networking I

Course Description: The first section provides a foundation in data communications as a major component of current and evolving telecommunications systems and the Internet. Topics include models of communications and layered architectures; analysis of data, signals and transmission capacity; digital voice and video; link protocols and error control; and multiplexing and statistical sharing of network resources. Internet related examples are used to motivate and illustrate the topics covered. Students present reports on an organization and its use of networking, and use HTML to prepare a Web page.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 834 Data Communications and Networking II

Note: This course may be taken for either 2 or 3 credits.

Course Description: The second section examines in detail the issues and techniques for computer networking, emphasizing LANs, internetworking via TCP/IP, and the Internet. The ISO Reference Model and the TCP/IP protocols form the framework. Topics include: LAN strategies and standards such as shared and switched Ethernet, FDDI and ATM; LAN internetworking using bridges and routers; routing strategies and congestion in networks; the IP protocol; transport layer strategies and the TCP and UDP protocols; HTTP and the Web. Students develop a simple Web-based application using HTML and JAVA.

2 - 3 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 833 Min Grade C

DCS 835 Data Communications III

Course Description: In the third section, students examine current and emerging Internet services and protocols. Topics include the Domain Name System, FTP, and SNMP; as well as security and e-commerce; multicasting, multimedia, quality of service (QOS) protocols and Internet telephony. Students report on current Internet topics and also develop an interactive Web-based programming project.

2 - 3 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 834 Min Grade C

DCS 860A Topics in Emerging Computer Technologies

Prerequisite: Completion of the first year of doctoral study.

Course Description: These courses consist of topics of current interest to students. Cutting edge issues and emerging information technology areas are explored. Students register for two or three topics per semester. A major goal for these courses is to understand the technological life cycle of emerging information technologies, their issues, and potential impact. Visiting experts in computing and IT discuss their current research and development activities.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 860B Topics in Data Security

Prerequisite: Completion of the first year of doctoral study.

Course Description: This course aims at introducing doctoral students to research problems and ideas in emerging topics in information security. This course will introduce information security topics in several current research areas including countermeasures to Internet attacks, insider threats and solutions for organizations, economics of information security and security usability. This course is a research seminar. Students will learn research methods and research problems in information security and learn to critique research works/papers in this area.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 860D Topic: Distributed Internet Components and Middleware

Note: This course may be taken for either 2 or 3 credits.

Course Description: Essential concepts of XML and reasons for XML’s importance; the role of XML in enterprise system integration; essentials of XSL technologies for XML data/document transformation; essential concepts of business process modeling; unsolved problems in XML, BPM, Ajax, and Web services.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 860F Topics in Computing and Information Technology: Assistive Technology

Course Description: Assistive technology is any item, piece of equipment or product system whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.

The course is intended to facilitate an understanding of how assistive technologies are used as well as how they function. The emphasis of this course is on determining appropriate technology supports that can be used to increase functioning of school age children with disabilities. The course covers the range of AT supports for children with learning disabilities in the areas of reading, writing, and spelling; access for children with physical disabilities; strategies for children with sensory impairments, and communication options for children with severe expressive communication disorders. Additionally, we will discuss the legal mandates and funding issues.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 860G Topics in Computing and Information Technology: Project Management and Systems

Course Description: This course combines project management methods and structured systems development techniques and applies them to the complex world of information systems development. The central project management functions planning, organizing and controlling are presented in the context of the systems development process. Topics include project planning, estimating, testing, implementation, documentation, management of change, utilization of services consultants, software houses, turn-key systems and proprietary software packages.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861A Topics in Emerging Computer Technologies II

Note: This course may be taken for either 2 or 3 credits.

Course Description: This course presents a variety of topics not fully covered in the concurrent seminars or in earlier course material. Four of these topics are selected, investigated, and presented by the student teams. The course goals are to gain a better understanding of the emerging information technologies covered this semester, their issues and potential impact, and to complete team and individual deliverables relating to the material.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861B Topics in Data Mining

Course Description: Topics of current interests to students. Cutting edge issues and emerging information technology areas are explored. Students register for two or three topics per semester. A major goal for these courses is to understand the technological life cycle of emerging information technologies, their issues, and potential impact. Visiting experts in computing and IT discuss their current research and development activities.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861C Internet Performance

Course Description: Topics of current interests to students. Cutting edge issues and emerging information technology areas are explored. Students register for two or three topics per semester. A major goal for these courses is to understand the technological life cycle of emerging information technologies, their issues, and potential impact. Visiting experts in computing and IT discuss their current research and development activities.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861D Topic: Human Computer

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861E Topic: Patterns

Note: This course may be taken for either 2 or 3 credits.

Course Description: This course will examine the creation and use of patterns of software. Students will read patterns and write patterns. We interpret "Patterns of Software" broadly to include design patterns, organizational patterns, and even the pedagogical patterns used in teaching software.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861I Social Networking Opportunities and Challenges

Note: This course may be taken for either 2 or 3 credits.

Course Description: With the huge proliferation of social networking sites such as Second Life, Facebook, MySpace, blogs and wikis, we face new opportunities and challenges finding ways to utilize these in the academic environment. Through this class, we will explore how social networking can be used to enable and enhance the learning environment. We will also discuss risk factors that arise when working in a social network online.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 861J Integrating Emerging Technologies into the Curriculum

Note: This course may be taken for either 2 or 3 credits.

Course Description: This course deals with the introduction and use of computers and mobile digital devices in a modern classroom environment and the integration of these technologies into the K-12 curriculum. Topics considered include appropriate use of the Internet by students, the researching of Internet databases such as the Wikipedia by students, the restrictions imposed on students when accessing the Internet, and the use of the information obtained online. The acceptable use of such mobile devices such as MP3 players, cellular, telephones, and Personal Digital Assistants are discussed. Ethical issues such as online plagiarism and inappropriate classroom behavior are also considered.

2 - 3 credits

DCS 891A Research Seminar I

Course Description: This seminar introduces the student to what research in computing and information technology is about. Faculty and/or invited researchers will make presentations of either their own research or someone else's research. Students will be given papers to read in advance of the presentation, and are expected to participate in discussions about the essence and context of the research area both in online discussion forums and in the weekend onsite meetings.

This seminar also introduces the student to the literature search process. Students will be required to find at least one full text article, one hard copy article (for which full text is not available), one Internet source paper, and one dissertation abstract which relates to any of the research areas presented in the seminar. They will read these and publish on the Internet a short piece discussing the relevance of the work.

1 - 4 credits

DCS 891B Research Seminar II

Course Description: Research Seminar II continues the process begun in the first seminar. Faculty or invited researchers will assign papers for the class to study together. Students and faculty will discuss the essence and context of the research. Students will search the literature for other related work and formulate a related research problem(s).

1 - 4 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 891A Min Grade C

DCS 891C Research Seminar III

Course Description: In Research Seminars I and II, students were given specific papers to read as a class. In Research Seminar III each student is to select one paper from the set of papers placed in the Pace Library Online Reserve for the course, or they may select a paper of their choice with instructor approval. The number of students per paper is limited to a maximum of three. The method of selection is first-come first-served. The following describe the deliverables for the course. They are to be available in written form on the web for all to see, and each paper will be presented to the class at the onsite weekend face-to-face sessions. Each student is responsible for publishing his or her own work on a web site. This begins the individual progression toward the dissertation.

1 - 4 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 891B Min Grade C

DCS 891D Research Seminar IV

Course Description: This seminar extends the research process begun in Research Seminar III. In this course a student must search the literature and select a paper(s) in an area of his or her own research interest. The main deliverable for this seminar is the near final draft of the Dissertation Idea Paper as described in the Dissertation Guide for the D.P.S. in Computing. The student should consider the following research guidelines and research plan when preparing the Idea Paper.

1 - 4 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 891C Min Grade C

DCS 891E Research Seminar V

Course Description: In this seminar in the sequence, students pursue in greater depth a research interest leading to the dissertation. The deliverable for this seminar is the first draft of the Dissertation Proposal as described in the Dissertation Guide for the D.P.S. in Computing. This should include a major portion of the literature search.

1 - 4 credits

Prerequisites

DCS 891D Min Grade C

DCS 891F Research Seminar VI

Course Description: This research seminar introduces the students to the methods and styles of computing research through presentations by faculty and industry professionals and by studying selected research documents. Students learn to identify new computing research problems and to formulate research proposals in preparation for their dissertation research.

1 - 4 credits

DCS 990 Dissertation for Doctor of Professional Studies in Computing I

This course is open only to students in the Doctor of Professional Studies in Computing program.

Course Description: The dissertation is an original, rigorous, independent applied research product that may advance knowledge, improve professional practice, and/or contribute to the understanding of computing. It is a disciplined and systematic inquiry for the purpose of establishing or extending the field of study. Research methods used depend upon the nature of the research; controlled experiment, project development, empirical studies, theoretical analyses, or other methods as appropriate.

6 - 9 credits

DCS 991 Dissertation for DPS in Computing II

Course Description: Continuation of the dissertation research and completion of the dissertation manuscript. In addition to the dissertation manuscript, students will be expected to prepare a paper for publication and to present their completed research.

6 - 9 credits