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WS-Women-s-Gender-Studies

WS 115 Intro to Women's & Gender Studies

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: This class is an introduction to gender studies, using both historical and contemporary material, and transnational contexts. It takes an interdisciplinary approach to gender, studying the topic from the perspectives of science and technology; citizenship and the state; and cultural representations and consumption. The course draws on a variety of disciplines in our reading, including history, literary criticism, sociology, economics, and anthropology.

3 credits

WS 215 Introduction to Women's Studies

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: Reading literary and historical works from many cultures, students will gain a better understanding of how artistic endeavors connect to the everyday lives of women and men. Students will also continue to work on their writing skills.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for WS 215 ( Course : ENG 120 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or ( Test: English Placement 120)

WS 220 The Medieval Woman

Old Core: This course may be substituted for LIT 211 or LIT 212. May be taken for upper-level credit in the English major with the permission of Instructor. Required for Medieval Studies minors.

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: This course examines a range of literatures written by or about women in the Middle Ages. The study of literature will be complemented by readings from historical analyses of medieval women, along with slide lectures on medieval art history on three themes: medieval women at work, women as readers, and women as saints.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENG 102 Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120 Minimum Grade of D

WS 234 The Girl Child-A Global Perspective

Course Description: According to the United Nations, children and youth constitute a high percent of the world’s population. This 3-credit course examines key issues in the lives of girl children including, international rights, gender development, gender stereotypes, globalizations, child trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation, girls affected by armed conflict, education and schooling, child labor, gender-based violence, female genital mutilation, health and health care. Through an analysis of the ways that gender, race and class intersect, students will have the opportunity to examine the multitude of ways that access to different levels of the social hierarchy allows them to differently negotiate culture, thus increasing or decreasing among other things, their happiness, stress safety, health, and psychological well being. This course is approved for AOK3 and AOK5.

Course Rotation: NY:Fall

3 credits

WS 250 Queer Stories:LGBTQ People and Communities in Historical Context

Course Description: This course focuses on the past three centuries in North America and Western Europe in order to understand the ways in which the historical cultures of those regions developed particular anxieties which drove the creation of new norms, stereotypes and roles related to gender and sexuality. We will also investigate the ways in which queer identities and sub-cultures grew from the many points of resistance to such norms. Few cultures have developed as many penal, medical, and popular bodies of knowledge and techniques to police the gender and desire of individuals. The course begins with a brief survey of classical Mediterranean sexualities in order to understand the historical distinctions between concepts of homoeroticism and gender ambiguity in antiquity and modern times. We then turn to an examination of the 18th century in order to examine the growth of urban subcultures of gender deviance, along with attempts by Europeans to come to terms with gender and sexual differences in the cultures they encountered in the colonial world. The course will cover the emergence of sexual discourses in the human sciences and bohemian and "free love" cultures that emerged during the nineteenth century, and survey the queer sub-cultures, communities, and politics that surfaced in the urban industrial economies of cosmopolitan centers like London, San Francisco, and Berlin during the early twentieth century. The Second World War and the surrounding historical circumstances proved a significant event, with sometimes tragic consequences, for queer people. The course then turns to an examination of the post-war era, centering on the international Homophile Movement as well as the more radical Gay Liberation Movement influenced by New Left Radicalism, Women’s Liberation, and Post-Colonial Nationalist Movements that convulsed much of the world in the 1960s and 1970s. The course concludes with a discussion of the effects of the devastating HIV/AIDS Pandemic of the 1980s and 1990s.

Coure Rotation: NY: Fall.

3 credits

WS 266 Gender, Race and Class

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines the interdependence of the categories gender, race and class in world history and literature, in recent cultural theory, and in contemporary lives. It considers both cultural and political conflicts that arise from the postcolonial global landscape and the oppression of marginalized peoples and analyzes how gender, race, and class roles are constructed, negotiated, and manipulated through literature and other media.

3 credits

WS 266A Gender, Race, and Class - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V. Course Description: This course examines how our consumption impacts the commonly-held core values of our society. We will focus on issues of sex and sexuality and look at them through lens of women's and gender theory and basic principles of economics. The course will focus on changes in supply and demand, income distribution, consumer behavior and other economic factors and address how our consumption impacts what we believe about sexuality, pornography, gender, our bodies, and our health.

3 credits

Corequisites

ECO 106A

WS 266B Gender, Race and Class - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Revised Course Description: This paired learning community explores violence and issues of violence as they relate to women and women's bodies. The courses would define "violence" as it pertains to mental, emotional, and physical acts of violence towards women in the U.S. and abroad, focusing on such prevailing issues as domestic violence, rape, pornography, and global violence against women, as well as movements towards fighting the patriarchal hegemony that allows such atrocities. We will incorporate films and guest speakers, along with visits to institutions and / or attendance at lectures or events that empower and / or support women.

3 credits

Corequisites

ENG 120B

WS 266C Gender, Race and Class (CAP)

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.
br /> Course Description: This course examines the interdependence of the categories gender, race and class in world history and literature, in recent cultural theory, and in contemporary lives. It considers both cultural and political conflicts that arise from the postcolonial global landscape and the oppression of marginalized peoples and analyzes how gender, race, and class roles are constructed, negotiated, and manipulated through literature and other media.

3 credits

WS 266E Gender, Race, and Class - Learning Community

Course Description: This paired learning community is geared for those whose majors do not require a specific math class and who would like to explore cultural issues in depth. These courses will examine stereotypes of gender, race, and class from ancient to modern times through the lens of mathematical studies. We will examine how these three categories intersect and become intertwined in social reality. How can math be used to describe and analyze those realities?

3 credits

Corequisites

MAT 102E

WS 266F Gender, Race & Class: Women in the Economy: The Labor Force & the Household in a Global Context: LC

Course Description: This learning community covers the subjects of women's economic inequality, women's economic contribution and how globalization impacts women around the globe. The class first focuses on traditional women's roles within the family, the age of women entering into the workforce, and areas where women are leaders. Other topics are the working conditions and wages women are paid compared to men, and possible means to improve the status of women in the economy. Examples come from the United States, as well as countries around the globe.

3 credits

Corequisites

ECO 296HF

WS 266Q Gender, Race and Class - Learning Community

Course Description: This Learning Community examines current and historical differences in pay and employment experience between women and men, and between whites and ethnic and racial minorities. It explores the interdependencies of gender, race,and class in world history, literature, and cultural theory in post-colonial culture. Explanations of the differentials and trends are surveyed; in particular, a variety of economic and cultural theories of discrimination are explored. Students examine definitions of class, data on class differences, and how gender, race, and class roles are constructed, negotiated, and reproduced.

3 credits

Corequisites

ECO 266Q

WS 268 Men and Masculinities

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: What does it mean to "be a man"? This course examines men and masculinity in the light of contemporary gender theories and will discuss men's relations to violence, culture, the family, sexuality, the women's movement, and each other.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for WS 268 ( Course : ENG 120 . Minimum Grade of D. )

WS 269 Lesbians in Literature and Film

Old Core: Fulfills LIT 211 or LIT 212. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV

Course Description: This course introduces students to a broad range of lesbian-identified literature and film. Because of difficulties in defining what constitutes lesbianism prior to 1860, the course will take a social constructionist perspective and will focus on literature written after 1900. Structured historically, the course will cover many genres-- novels, short story, plays, films, popular culture, and poetry.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring, odd years; PLV: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENG 102 Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120 Minimum Grade of D

WS 270 A Cultural History of Sexualities from Prehistory to the Present

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: Changes in sexuality during the 1960's are referred to as the "sexual revolution." Using literature, historical texts and films, this course will examine sexual revolutions in a variety of cultures from prehistory to the present, with special emphasis on how they influence sexual values and practices in our culture today.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring . PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for WS 270 ( Course : ENG 120 . Minimum Grade of D. )

WS 271 Women in Jeopardy

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV. Old Core: Fulfills 211 or LIT 212.

Course Description: Students in this course will read four powerful and tragic novels by women of the 20th century, each from a different generation and social milieu. The novels will be discussed in class from feminist and literary perspectives.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for WS 271 ( Course : ENG 120 . Minimum Grade of D. )

WS 280 Internship in Women's and Gender Studies

Prerequisite: WS 215 or WS 215C or WS 266. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I. Service Learning Component.

Course Description: This course is designed for Women's and Gender Studies majors and minors, but is open to all students. Students will work eight hours or more per week in an internship placement. The weekly class meeting will focus on readings and discussions about gender, race, class and labor history, conditions of the contemporary workforce, sexual harassment, the glass ceiling, and the feminization of poverty.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for WS 280 ( Course : WS 215 . Minimum Grade of D. ) or (Course : WS 266 . Minimum Grade of D. )

WS 285 Queer Cinema

Course Description:The word "queer" implies that the vast range of stigmatized sexualities and gender identifications, far from being marginal, are central to the construction of modern subjectivity. One premise of this course is that cinema does not merely "reflect" but actually produces disparate-normative and queer-constructions of sexuality and gender through specific cinematic structures and conventions. Therefore, a key concern of the class will be to explore issues important to both queer theory and the study of film, including questions of desire, identification, representation, spectatorship, cultural appropriation, and performativity. A second premise is that identity categories do not function in isolation. Therefore, another central concern of the course will be to explore to what extent the project of queer theory engages in dialogue with other politically motivated inquiries such as the African American rhetorical tradition of Signifying (g) or post-colonial mimicry.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENG 120 Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120A Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120B Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120C Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120D Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120E Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120F Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120G Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120H Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120I Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120J Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120K Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120L Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120M Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120N Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120O Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120P Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120Q Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120R Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120S Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120T Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120U Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120V Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120W Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120X Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120Y Minimum Grade of D or ENG 120Z Minimum Grade of D or INT 197T Minimum Grade of D or INT 198F Minimum Grade of D

WS 288 Women and Film: Past and Present

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the variety of issues involved in study of women in film. The class focuses both on representations of women in film and films made by women. Each two-week segment of the course will pair two films from different historical eras: these films will be discussed in relationship to changing issues in feminist film theory and the changes in representation over time. Themes to be discussed include: the fetishization of the female image, female directors in the Hollywood industry, the relationship between representations of race and gender, the female action hero, and the "femme fatale".

Course Rotation: NY: Fall

3 credits

WS 289 Science Fiction and Gender

Course Description: This course considers gender and power as they are represented in science fiction stories, novels and films. In particular, we will analyze the social and ideological functions of works such as "Frankenstein", "Star Wars", "The Left hand of Darkness", and "Alien", addressing them not only in their original cultural context but as present day texts. Students will complete a series of formal essays and produce one short story or film.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall

3 credits

WS 296D Gender, Power, and Grassroots: Politics in American Society

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I. Service Learning Component.

Course Description: This course examines the exercise of power by women in America today - with an emphasis on women in public life. Students will study major figures in women's political history, looking for pathways to power for ordinary citizens as well as national leaders. They will examine myths and facts about gender performance and debate why issues like Title 9 and an Equal Rights Amendment still stir controversy. Students will conduct classroom exercises on making the system work, from the neighborhood level to President of the United States. In addition to class meetings, students will also complete 25 hours of volunteer work and research on their communities over the course of the semester.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring PLV: TBA

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENG 102 Min Grade D or ENG 120 Min Grade D

WS 296X Topic: Slumming and Tramping: The Queer America

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Western Heritage (Area of Knowledge II) or Humanistic and Creative Expression (Area of Knowledge IV).

Course Description: This course will provide students with foundational knowledge of LGBTQ culture and history in America, while challenging preconceived notions and "norms" brought to the class, with the goal of creating more aware and engaged citizens.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENG 120 Min Grade D

WS 297A Topic: Asian/American Women

Course Description: Drawing on examples from antiquity to the present day, this course examines Asian and Asian American women as symbols of power and as figures of resistance in the realms of kinship and sexuality, literacy and the literary arts, politics and activism, and a range of performance cultures.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring, even years.

3 credits

WS 297S Job Opportunities in Sexuality Education and Reproductive Justice in the Nonprofit Sector

Course Description: A vast array of nonprofit organizations are devoted to or include programs on sexuality policy and research, reproductive rights, abortion, contraception, gay, lesbian, transgender, and intersex issues. This course highlights internship and job opportunities in non-profit organizations that focus on or include sexuality and reproductive justice issues. Course materials from both scholarly and popular sources will broaden students’ knowledge on sexuality, abortion, contraception, and the medicalization of sexuality and will provide them with significant advantages when competing in this vibrant and dynamic job market.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring.

3 credits

WS 266CE Gender, Race and Class (CAP) - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This Learning Community examines the interdependence of the categories gender, race and class in a variety of literary genres, media, and in the contemporary lives. Through written assignments and class discussion, students will examine how gender, race, and class roles are constructed, negotiated, and manipulated through literature and other media.

3 credits

Corequisites

ENG 105CE, ENG 110CE

WS 305 Philanthropy on a Mission: Women and Change in the Non-Profit Sector

Course Description: Gender is an organizational issue and its affects both how we help women and families in need, and who helps them. Using the perspective of gender equity, the course will explore women’s impact on nonprofit organizations from leadership roles to work on the front lines. We will examine how gender, diversity and leadership are social constructions that can be transformed to maximize women’s contributions to the sector. The course uses a variety of conceptual frameworks which will foster students’ understanding of the factors that influence gender and inclusion in organizations and how these dynamics shape the work of nonprofits. Students will identify and analyze a specific nonprofit that has successfully addressed issues of gender equity internally and externally through its program repertoire. They will also explore several practice areas such as program design and management, planning, fundraising issues and program evaluation for non-profits.

Coure Rotation: NY: Spring.

3 credits

WS 340 Queer Cinema/Theory

Course Descripition:The word QUEER implies that the vast range of stigmatized sexualities and gender identifications, far from being marginal, are central to the construction of modern subjectivity. One premise of this course is that cinema does not merely "reflect" but actually produces disparate-normative and queer-constructions of sexuality and gender through specific cinematic structures and conventions. The course therefore examines issues important to both queer theory and the study of film, including questions of desire, identification, representation, spectatorship, cultural appropriation, and performativity. A second premise is that identity categories do not function in isolation. Therefore, this course also explores to what extent he project of queer theory engages in dialogue it other politically motivated inquiries, such as the African American rhetorical tradition of Signifyin(g) or post-colonial mimicry.
Course Rotation:NY:PLV;Fall

3 credits

WS 380 Seminar in Feminist Theory

Prerequisite: WS 215 or WS 215C or WS 266 or permission of Director of Women's and Gender Studies. This course may substitute LIT 327. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: This course explores how feminist theories and criticism have changed the questions we ask of literary and other texts. The readings trace the confrontation/collaboration of feminism(s) with linguistics, social analysis and Marxism, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and aesthetics.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - PLV: TBA

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for WS 380 ( Course : WS 215 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : WS 215C . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : WS 266 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : WS 266A to 266Z. Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : WSA 266 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : WSM 266 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : WS 266CE . Required Courses: 1. )