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ENV - Environmental Studies

ENV 100 Water, Wildlife and Windmills - An Introduction to Environmental Studies and Sciences

New Core: Fulfills 3-credits in Analysis of Human, Social, and Natural Phenomena (Area of Knowledge V).

Course Description:
This is the gateway for majors in Environmental Studies and Science. This course is designed around three problem-based learning modules, using focused questions to teach students the relationship between science and policy. The specific questions will be related to three basic topics resources (water), biodiversity (wildlife) and sustainable energy (windmills.). Possible questions include: Is it safe to drink your tap water? Do we want to live with bears? How many windmills make sense (and where)?
Course Rotation: NY, PLV: Fall

3 credits

ENV 105 Social Responsibility and the World of Nature

Course Description: This course considers the idea of citizenship in relation to obligations to nature through a multidisciplinary examination of primary texts from economics, environmentalist studies, philosophical ethics, political economy, and social ecology. Direct student participation in the workings of local government will provide the community-based component and encourage leadership skills through active engagement on Community Board and Town Council environmental committees (environmental committees include land use, preservation, etc.). While in-class reports and a journal focus on the relationship between the more theoretical course readings and the civic experience serve to integrate learning and service.

Course Rotation: NY, PLV Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ENV 110 Nature and Culture: A Study in Connections

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines prominent worldviews that have guided human action toward the natural world. By reading the influential environmental writings of philosophers, economists, environmentalists, theologians, political science, biologists, and naturalists we analyze the interactions between human and natural phenomena, the impact human actions have on the natural world, and the ways nature affects change in civilization. The primary goal of the course is to provide students an opportunity to see how global and interdisciplinary views of nature influence human choices and offer alternative courses of action toward viable solutions that are subject to an ethical analysis.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring

3 credits

ENV 110C Nature and Culture: A Study in Connections - CAP

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines prominent worldviews that have guided human action toward the natural world. By reading the influential environmental writings of philosophers, economists, environmentalists, theologians, political science, biologists, and naturalists we analyze the interactions between human and natural phenomena, the impact human actions have on the natural world, and the ways nature affects change in civilization. The primary goal of the course is to provide students an opportunity to see how global and interdisciplinary views of nature influence human choices and offer alternative courses of action toward viable solutions that are subject to an ethical analysis.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring

3 credits

ENV 111 Environmental Studies: Economical, Ethical and Political Perspectives

Required course for Environmental Studies majors.

Course Description: This interdisciplinary course will concentrate on the interdependence between nature and culture, integrating the economic, political and philosophical issues involved in environmental problems. General topics in value assessment and application to public policy are studied from a problem-oriented approach.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

ENV 112 Environmental Studies- Basic Issues

Course Description: As in ENV 111, the relationship between nature and human culture will serve as a backdrop for the course. From the perspectives of economics, philosophical ethics and political science, this course critically examines central topics in the environment. Air and water pollution, population, deforestation, biodiversity, global warming, resource use, renewable and nonrenewable energy are considered from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

ENV 130 The Naturalists

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with aesthetic insight into the natural world through the creative and imaginative writings and observations of famous naturalists. Significant time will be spent studying aesthetic categories has influenced the conceptual profile and strategies of the environmental movement in the West. Classroom discussions and experimental field studies will blend theory with first hand experiences. Investigation of the perception and reality of "our place" in the world of nature and how aesthetic responses and art has influenced that perception over the years provide the enduring theme for the course.

Course Rotation: Spring

3 credits

ENV 140 Act Locally: Environmental Issues and you

Course Description:The course introduces students to the maxim "Think globally, act locally" originated by renowned scientist and naturalist Rene Dubos. Based on this philosophy students will be enlightened about global environmental issues from the perspective of an uninformed citizen. Correlations will be made between humans and their interrelationships to the natural world by examining social, economic and environmental influences. As part of a community service component students will be engaged in team projects that will provide educational programs to the Pace community during Earth Month.

Course Rotation: PLV Spring

3 credits

ENV 172 Introduction to World Regional Geography

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the field of geography through an examination of the principal regions of the world. Geographic’s regions are part of the world that share a conceptual unity because they possess some sort of organizing principal such a physical, human, economic, and/or political characteristics. Throughout the semester, we will examine not only the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America", but also the various benefits and drawbacks of the continued use of such conceptualizations to understand our increasingly interconnected world. Student will develop a better understanding of the affairs and conditions of world regions, as well as developing a critical approach to the way we come to understand the world around us.

Course Rotation: PLV; Fall

3 credits

ENV 201 Animals and Society

Course Description: Animals and Society directs students in the interdisciplinary evaluation of the human-non-human relationship, and how contemporary methods of exploitation pose benefits and harms to humans and animals alike. The course will review a range of applied topics, including domestication, cognition, wildlife and hunting, zoos, companion animals, entertainment, meat production, and vegetarianism. Students acquire literacy in current animal welfare and rights issues, learn about laws that effect animals, and develop the writing and advocacy skills to participate in social media activism. As a civic engagement course with a hand-on component, everyone is required to volunteer at a local animal shelter.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring

3 credits

ENV 205 Globalization, Trade and the Environment

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in World Traditions and Cultures (Area of Knowledge III)

Course Description: Ever since the end of the Cold War the social, political, and economic forces have coalesced to reshape the world. One of the most striking features that has emerged since then, on the world stage, is the trend towards global economic integration. Globalization, in spite of its popular and common usage, is very much a contested concept. Some emphasize the increasing interconnections between different players' economic, political, and cultural fields while others stress the notion that globalization is essentially an effort to undermine the national sovereignty and authentic identities of nation states by transitional actors.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring

3 credits

ENV 211 Environmental Assessment

Pre-requisite: ENV 296A - Z or SCI 226, which may be taken concurrently.

Course Description: Following a study of relevant environmental regulations, this course will demonstrate the tools and techniques used in developing and interpreting natural resource inventories and in analyzing the potential social, cultural and political impacts of particular types of land use. Using extensive field work, students will learn how locate, read and interpret maps, how to conduct field surveys of soil, vegetation and animal resources, and how to analyze the accumulated data and predict the land use capability of a particular site. Lab work will consist of analyzing data in Geographic Information Systems. Professionally-prepared environmental impact statements will be analyzed for content, methodology, and compliance with the applicable laws.

Course Rotation: NYC and PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

SCI 226 Minimum Grade of D or ENV 296 Minimum Grade of D

ENV 215 Foundations of Environmental Law for Non-Lawyers

Course Description: This course offers students an introduction to American environmental law. The first two weeks will provide the student with a basic introduction to the legal process, sources of law, and the anatomy of a case brief. Students will be presented with an overview of how the United States legal system works at the local, state, and national levels. The majority of the semester will be focused on the foundations for environmental law. The history of the environmental movement will be discussed as well as development of laws that affect environmental issues. Throughout the course, we will consider the roles of individuals and nonprofit organizations in the administrative and litigation processes. Students will become acquainted with specific environmental laws, enforcement, and methods for compliance.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall, odd years

3 credits

ENV 220 Darwin on Ecology

New Core: Fulfills 3 Credits In Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course will examine the roots and development of the science of natural history and the pivotal role played by Charles Darwin in its transformation into the modern interdisciplinary science of ecology. The essential interdisciplinary aspects of ecology will be emphasized. A solid historical background will provide the student with the necessary platform to think critically about current and new ideas in ecology and to effectively communicate through placing these ideas in an historical context.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ENV 221 Environmental Science: The Web of Life

Not for Science majors.

Course Description: An introduction to living systems and the environment that sustains them. Topics covered include: the diversity of life, food chains, ecosystems, elements of recycling, eutrophication, and the Greenhouse Effect. This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the organization, structure and function of living organisms, with emphasis on their interaction with the environment.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

ENV 222 Environmental Chemistry: Principles, Problems and Solutions

Course Description: This course assumes no prior knowledge of chemistry. The course will teach the basic principles of chemistry and then focus on some environmental issues, which have chemical implications. Some of those topics which will be covered are: air pollution, water pollution and cleanup, soil fertility, agricultural chemicals, nuclear topics, plastics, hazardous waste, acid rain, ozone depletion, greenhouse gases, and photochemical smog.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

ENV 226 Environmental Anthropology

Course Description: Environmental anthropology is the study of the relationship between different cultures and their natural environments. This course examines how human communities traditionally adapted their subsistence strategies and social organization to their local environments and how these adaptations changed over time. The emphasis is on the diversity of these adaptations in different places, e.g. in arctic zones, highlands, arid lands, grasslands, and tropical rain forests. The course also investigates how economic development and globalization influenced these adaptations and thereby contributed to contemporary environmental problems that in turn affect cultures and continue to change them. A historical survey of anthropological contributions to environmental studies covers the following topics: Population, economic development, biodiversity, environmentality, indigenous groups, consumption, and globalization. Finally, the course looks at the different forms of environmentalism that have emerged from these perspectives.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring

3 credits

ENV 230 Natural Beauty: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetic

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Humanistic and Creative Expression (Area of Knowledge IV).

Course Description: This course examines various aesthetic senses of nature and their influence on human reactions to the natural world. We will read texts by environmentalists, naturalists, philosophers, ecologists, theologians, and literary works like the flamboyant and exhibitionist 19th century romantics, and the distinctly American phenomena of New England Transcendentalism. We will view works of art from different historical periods and traditions, for example the Hudson River School painters, landscapes of the pointillists, and traditional Chinese landscape painting, and witness Constable's capturing the chiaroscuro of nature in the dews and breezes of the countryside. We will not only study the aesthetics of beauty, but also investigate aesthetic qualities broadly defined to include symbolic codes and properties that metaphorically express particular cultural values.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring, odd years

3 credits

ENV 235 Sustainable Living in Our World

Course Description:This course will examine how psychology and other social sciences can contribute to a sustainable future through the study of attitudes, values, knowledge, and behavior associated with environment problems of the 21st century. Readings and class discussions will apply theoretical perspectives and empirical findings to subjects such as environmental justice, development of environmental identity and ethics, perception of risk, and the benefits of nature experience. Field trips will offer opportunities to explore sustainability at the local level. For their final project students will conduct a detailed study of an environmental problem on campus or in the neighborhood through collection of both archival and field data, and will propose a strategy for change.

Course Rotation: NYC and PLV: Fall

3 credits

ENV 240 Environmental Practices in American Culture and Society

Old Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Analysis of Human, Social, and Natural Phenomena.

Course Description: This course introduces students to research methods in anthropology and the social sciences that can be applied to the study of environmental practices in American culture and society. Over the course of the semester, students will gain practical knowledge and real experience by designing and carrying out their own ethnographic research on environmental practices at Pace University, from sampling and developing interview protocols and survey questionnaires, to collecting, organizing, and describing and analyzing the data. Methods include participant observation, in-depth interviews, and structured surveys. The emphasis is on the integration of quantitative and qualitative data. At the end of the course, students will write up the results of their research; their findings will be disseminated through the Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies (PIERS), and made available to the Pace community to help further the university’s mission: environmental sustainability.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall, Odd Years

3 credits

ENV 260 Climatology

Course Description:It’s taken billions of years to generate the exact, quintessential conditions needed for humans to survive on Earth, and yet in less than a century, humans now threaten to upset the delicate balance that makes existence on this planet possible. Starting with the industrial revolution, the use of fossil fuels have enabled the population to prosper abs grow with the consequence of creating a blanket of heat surrounding the earth that is jeopardizing our climate’s stability. While climate has naturally cycled over the course of earth’s long history, the changes that have begun are because of anthropogenic meddling, and 98% of scientists agree that we must take control of our addiction to fossil fuels or risk the habitability of the planet. The scientific mechanisms of atmospheric and ocean circulation are well understood, and climate scientists are actively trying to predict the outcome of our actions through climate models and computer forecasting. Even with the mountain of evidence stacked up and the inevitability of widespread conflict if we don’t work to solve this crisis, political and public discourse has been problematic with the barrage of disinformation that’s been concocted from the fossil fuel industries who stand to profit from inaction, will we be able to overcome the monumental obstacle we face? Or have we already surpassed the tipping point? By the end of the course, you’ll have an in depth understanding of climate change from both scientific and social perspectives.
Course Rotation:NY, Fall

3 credits

ENV 285 Food Revolutions: The Politics

Course Description:The burgeoning Food Studies movement places human affinities for food within a cultural, ethical, and economic context. Food symbolizes something so much more powerful than what we might think at first glance; its taste gives our lives fulfillment and meaning, and what we eat establishes both positive and negative connections with other people, other animals, and other landscapes. In other words, what we eat defines who we are. Food matters because we matter. This course is an advanced introduction into Food Studies via three disciplinary trajectories; applied ethics (namely animal and environmental ethics), ecological economics, and industrial psychology. These three lenses, combined with a range of controversial documentaries and group presentations, will engage students in analysis of the complex role of food in every facet of our lives. Topics covered include biotechnology and genetic patenting, farmer’s markets and local food movements, organics, hunger and malnutrition, factory farms, molecular gastronomy, restaurant business models, resource distribution, veganism, and international economics.
Course Rotation:Spring;NY

3 credits

ENV 297A Topic: Environmental Clinic

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I (Civic Engagement and Public Values). Service learning component.

Course Description: The Environmental Clinic is a program of intensive civic engagement where student clinicians, in a team setting, work as professional environmental policy practitioners under the supervision of faculty from Pace Academy of Applied Environmental Studies, and in consultation with faculty from across Pace schools and colleges. Their primary responsibility is to design and implement policy reforms for real world environmental issues by representing "client," non-profit organizations from the community and region. Students will learn the essential civic-engagement skills necessary to serve their client organizations, such as legal, political and communication skills training, legislative history research, preparation of hearing testimony, oral and written presentations, new release writing, bill drafting, lobbying and its requirements, the role of non-profits and movement, and use of social media and technology-based methods of influencing public opinion.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.

3 credits

ENV 310 Environmental Policy and Sustainable Governance

Course Description: This "blended" course provides students with a broad introduction to multi-level (from personal to local to state/national/global) environmental policymaking and governance. Exploring environmental and sustainability issues to all these levels, students will learn about the controversies and enactment of US environmental laws and standards as well as new ideas about how individuals, cities, neighborhoods, nation states and global environmental movement play a role in creating a more sustainable world. The course will involve weekly online modules – representing one class period – as well as one on ground class meeting per week.

Course Rotation: NYC & PLV: Spring

3 credits

ENV 380 Introduction to Research Methods

Course Description: This course will guide students through the process of writing a research proposal relevant to the field. Students will learn how to do a literature review, frame a search question, develop a defined search strategy and then write a well-designed research proposal.

Course Rotation: Spring

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENV 100 Minimum Grade of C and ENV 221 Minimum Grade of C and ENV 222 Minimum Grade of C

ENV 396A Internship In Environmental Studies

Course Description: Students will work two days in an environmental policy organization or in a positon related to environmental policy in an organization. The students will meet weekly with a faculty member to discuss the assigned reading, the internship and to supervise the research and writing of the policy memos. The work supervisor will submit a written review of the student’s performance and produce three policy memos related to the students work experiences in the organization and covering three environmental issues. Course Rotation: Fall and Spring

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENV 100 Minimum Grade of C and ENV 211 Minimum Grade of C and ( ENV 221 Minimum Grade of C or ENV 222 Minimum Grade of C or SCI 226 Minimum Grade of C)

ENV 498 Mentoring Seminar

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of Department Chair.

Course Description: Students will select a faculty mentor and join an interdisciplinary research project.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENV 380 Minimum Grade of C

ENV 499 Senior Year Experience in Environmental Issues

Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair or Coordinator.

Course Description: The preparation of a thesis is the cumulating project of the environmental studies program. Students will be encouraged to investigate topics of current importance, especially regional environmental problems, and produce a major research paper.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENV 380 Minimum Grade of C and ENV 498 Minimum Grade of C