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ART 101 Introduction to the Arts

Course Description: An introduction to the creative process in the visual arts of painting, sculpture and architecture. Art works are interpreted in relation to their historical and geographical environment and on a comparative basis. Basic aesthetic concepts are applied to selected masterpieces of Western art.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 102 Art History: Ancient through Gothic Art

Course Description: First half of a year-long introductory survey of the major monuments of western art from ancient history through the Gothic period. Works of architecture, sculpture and painting are studied with special attention given to the development of style as well as the various techniques and qualities of each medium. The principles, basic methods, and terminology of art historical analysis are introduced. This course may be taken independently of ART 103. The class may visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Students may be required to cover museum admission fees.

3 credits

ART 103 Art History: Renaissance through Modern Art

Course Description: Second half of a year-long introductory survey of the major monuments of western art from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century. Works of painting, sculpture, and architecture are studied within their historical contexts. This course may be taken independently of ART 102. The class may visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Students may be required to cover museum admission fees.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

ART 104 History of Architecture

Course Description: Survey of the development of architecture from the prehistoric era to modern times. Examines historical developments, including the use of different structural techniques and building materials. Includes a museum visit.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

ART 108 Styles and Interiors

Course Description: A study of design elements and principles as they relate to interior design. Emphasis is on basic planning, and developing room elevations. Lectures and related assigned projects guide students through fundamental concepts in the field.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.

3 credits

ART 111 Introduction to Interior Design

Course Description: A study of design elements and principles as they relate to interior spaces. Emphasis on color theory, basic plan, elevations of rooms. A series of lectures and related assigned projects will introduce the student to the fundamentals of interior design.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring and PLV: Fall.

3 credits

ART 114 Styles and Interiors

Course Description: This course will consist of both studio work and lecture materials, and is intended to familiarize students with the classic, historical, and contemporary styles of furniture and interiors. Lectures will be supplemented by field trips and slide presentations: studio work will require students to make their own renderings of furnishings and interiors in specific styles.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 130 Sculpture I

Course Description: Students are introduced to a variety of traditional and contemporary techniques and approaches to sculpture. Casting processes are demonstrated, and students complete assignments using both glyptic and plastic methods.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

ART 130 Sculpture I

Course Description: Students are introduced to a variety of traditional and contemporary techniques and approaches to sculpture. Casting processes are demonstrated, and students complete assignments using both glyptic and plastic methods.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

ART 133 Ceramics I

Course Description: A studio course designed as an introduction to the forms and techniques of ceramics. Students learn wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques with emphasis on functional forms. Students form, glaze, and kiln fireworks of their own design.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ART 133 Ceramics I

Course Description: A studio course designed as an introduction to the forms and techniques of ceramics. Students learn wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques with emphasis on functional forms. Students form, glaze, and kiln fireworks of their own design.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ART 138 Painting in Watercolor I

Course Description: Students will explore the freshness and spontaneity of this challenging medium. The course will address problems of visualization, technique, and the manipulation of materials. ART 138 is an introduction to watercolor painting, including materials, techniques, and an overview of the diverse cultural traditions of this venerable art medium. This class will consist of in-class painting assignments, group discussions, field trips, slide lectures, and weekly homework assignments emphasizing skill building and creative exploration.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 140 Drawing I

Course Description: Students learn basic drawing techniques and experiment with media including pencil, charcoal, and pen and ink. Students acquire basic drawing skills and learn to draw from direct observation through projects including still life, landscapes, or abstraction. Figure drawing and linear perspective are introduced as are more conceptual approaches to drawing.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ART 140 Drawing I

Course Description: Students learn basic drawing techniques and experiment with media including pencil, charcoal, and pen and ink. Students acquire basic drawing skills and learn to draw from direct observation through projects including still life, landscapes, or abstraction. Figure drawing and linear perspective are introduced as are more conceptual approaches to drawing.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ART 140A Basic Drawing - Learning Community

Course Description: Learning Community with HIS 113KA. In ‘The City and the Workplace’ students will have an opportunity to read historical texts alongside works of historical fiction, and will have access to visual representations of life in New York City from the Colonial period to the present. In ‘Basic Drawing:The Graphic Novel’ each student will create a section of a graphic novel inspired by specific places, characters and events. Through these semester-long projects, students will develop their drawing, design, and storytelling skills as they bring the details of New York’s history to life. Students will visit the New York Historical Society, and both teachers will participate in the final graphic novel critique."

3 credits

ART 145 Painting I

Course Description: Contemporary painting materials and techniques are demonstrated using acrylic paints and mediums. The course includes basic color theory and its application to both figurative and abstract painting. Students work with a variety of subjects.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ART 145 Painting I

Course Description: Contemporary painting materials and techniques are demonstrated using acrylic paints and mediums. The course includes basic color theory and its application to both figurative and abstract painting. Students work with a variety of subjects.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

3 credits

ART 145A Painting I - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: The linked philosophical and studio components of this learning community move back and forth between philosophical aesthetics and actual art-making as if the student were taking a course in ornithology while training to become a bird. The readings for this course range from ancient to contemporary philosophy, while the art assignments will be executed in a variety of media.

3 credits

ART 145B Painting I - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: This learning community examines the traditional medium of painting along with new technologies of digital design. Student work will reflect a hybridization of techniques, new and traditional, in image making. Imagery generated digitally, using Photoshop or Flash, for example, will serve as a source for painting; similarly, a painting may be scanned into one of these programs and then manipulated.

3 credits

ART 153 Introduction to Photography

Prerequisite: A 35mm camera capable of manual control of F/stop and shutter speed.

Course Description: Students learn basic photographic techniques using the 35mm film camera. Students are introduced to cameras and equipment. Extensive darkroom work includes film processing, printing and enlargement of negatives, mounting and presentation of prints.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 153 Introduction to Photography

Prerequisite: A 35mm camera capable of manual control of F/stop and shutter speed.

Course Description: Students learn basic photographic techniques using the 35mm film camera. Students are introduced to cameras and equipment. Extensive darkroom work includes film processing, printing and enlargement of negatives, mounting and presentation of prints.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 155 Documentary Photography

Course Description:This course will introduce students to the practice and ideas of documentary photography through the completion of a project or series of related photographs. Students will be introduced to digital and analogue processes in color and B&W, and to trends and ideas in contemporary and historical documentary work. With greater skills and context in place, students will begin to put together a photographic project. They will be required to present work for critique every other week, complete a midterm presentation and project proposals, and complete the corresponding body of work self-published in published form.
Course Rotation:Fall; Spring

3 credits

Prerequisites

ART 153 Minimum Grade of D

ART 158 Printmaking

Course Description: The basic techniques of woodcut printmaking will be explained and demonstrated. Students will execute their own designs for black and white and color woodcuts and print off small editions.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 159 Photography I

Course Description: The student will be instructed in the use of basic camera equipment and techniques. Extensive darkroom work will include film processing, printing and enlargement of negatives, mounting and presentation.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 160 Digital Photography I

Course Description:Digital Photography I is a studio art course designed to introduce students to the use of the digital camera and to photography as a visual means of expression. Emphasis is on the expression of ideas through learning digital techniques, camera control and output options.

Course Rotation: NY: Fall and Spring

3 credits

ART 164 Principles of Design

Course Description: An introduction to the principles of design in the two-dimensional media. The course consists of demonstrations, lectures, and studio projects aimed at the development of the skills and concepts underlying the design process in a wide variety of visual art forms. Composition, balance, harmony, symmetry, and asymmetry will be explored along with basic color theory and application.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

ART 164 Principles of Design

Course Description: An introduction to the principles of design in the two-dimensional media. The course consists of demonstrations, lectures, and studio projects aimed at the development of the skills and concepts underlying the design process in a wide variety of visual art forms. Composition, balance, harmony, symmetry, and asymmetry will be explored along with basic color theory and application.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

ART 164E Principles of Design - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: This learning community offers basic introduction to design literacy. It will include such readings as: a biography of graffiti artist Keith Haring, a piece by Oliver Sachs on colorblindness, and City of Glass (a Graphic Novel) by Paul Auster, set in New York.

3 credits

ART 165 Mixed Media

Course Description: This course introduces students to a wide range of techniques in drawing, painting, collage and two and three-dimensional design. Students will experiment with media including watercolor, paint, cut-paper and graphite over many support materials, including mylar, photographs, magazines, etc. the course will consist of lectures, studio projects and a museum visit.

Course Rotation: NY, Spring.

3 credits

ART 167 Printmaking I

Course Rotation: The basic techniques of printmaking will be explained and demonstrated. Students will execute their own designs in black and white and color and print small editions.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 167 Printmaking I

Course Rotation: The basic techniques of printmaking will be explained and demonstrated. Students will execute their own designs in black and white and color and print small editions.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 169 3D Design

Course Description: This course will teach students basic elements of spatial design. Working with both simple constructive materials as well as 3D computer modeling software, students will explore the possibilities of organic and inorganic forms for both aesthetic and practical three-dimensional objects.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 173 Graphic Design I

Course will use computer programs and lab facilities.

Course Description: This course acquaints students with current processes of graphic reproduction utilizing the computer. Typefaces are compared and their appropriate uses demonstrated. Copy layout and all procedures involved in the production of finished mechanicals are explained and demonstrated. Practical studio work by students includes the complete preparation of advertisements, magazine pages, book covers, etc.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall.

3 credits

ART 174 Picturing Art in Film and Video

Course Description: The art of cinema can also be the cinema of art, that is, movies made about art and artists. This course will focus on the last fifty years of American art seen through films and videos produced up to the present time. Analysis of the a wide range of filmic approaches will contrast biographical dramas such as Pollock and Basquiat with classic documentaries such as Painters Painting, experimental narratives like Downtown 81 (with Jean-Michel Basquiat), or hybrid documentaries such as Charlie Ahearn's Artist Portrait Videos. The primary focus will be on the evolution of art and artist's studio practice.

Course Rotation: NY: Spring.

3 credits

ART 176 Visual Literacy

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV (Humanistic and Creative Expression).

Course Description: Visual Literacy introduces the study of our visual environment through readings, films, and design projects. We begin with an analysis of elements of visual design, and we read, create, observe, and respond to media, advertising, the web, film, and comics. There will be a balance between observation and readings with engaging experientially in creative projects.

Course Rotation: TBA

3 credits

ART 180 Introduction to Museum and Curatorial Studies

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of museum studies through an interactive seminar structured around the multiple functions performed by curators in various phases of their work. Weekly reading assignments on key topics addressing the changing role of museums in the 21st century will be supplemented with oral and written exercises encouraging students to experience more directly the key issues facing curators in art museums and commercial galleries all across the professional spectrum. The student's participation in the course will culminate in an oral presentation to the class and a corresponding term paper, focusing on a hypothetical exhibition to be planned by the student throughout the course, in consultation with the instructor
Course Rotation: PLV: Fall

3 credits

ART 186 Digital Design I

Course Description: This course will introduce the student to fundamentals of digital design including imaging collage, typography, composition, form, perspective, and color therapy. This course will explore artwork and graphics on the Macintosh Platform, familiarizing the student with Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and InDesign. The focus will be on acquiring creative artistic methods through projects and week-by-week skill development. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of design and art as a means of visual communication.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 186 Digital Design I

Course Description: This course will introduce the student to fundamentals of digital design including imaging collage, typography, composition, form, perspective, and color therapy. This course will explore artwork and graphics on the Macintosh Platform, familiarizing the student with Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and InDesign. The focus will be on acquiring creative artistic methods through projects and week-by-week skill development. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of design and art as a means of visual communication.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ART 186B Basic Digital Design - Learning Community

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV.

Course Description: This learning community examines the traditional medium of painting along with new technologies of digital design. Student work will reflect a hybridization of techniques, new and traditional, in image making. Imagery generated digitally, using Photoshop or Flash, for example, will serve as a source for painting; similarly, a painting may be scanned into one of these programs and then manipulated.

3 credits

ART 188 Art as a Vehicle of Social Commentary and Political Progress

New Core: Fulfills 3-credits in Humanistic and Creative Expression (Area of Knowledge IV).
Course Description: Political art has entered into mainstream discourse as an integral part of a new, more theoretically grounded and socially contextualized historical practice. Students will examine selected works of contemporary art conceived as social commentary and/or political protest. Class discussions will focus on the political relevance of current art, for example, Public Art and the controversy surrounding the World Trade Center memorial, Feminist Art, and media Technology and its uses as an interactive vehicle to advance social change.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, PLV: Fall.

3 credits

ART 188N Art of Social and Political Protest - Learning Community

Course Description: Within the social and political upheaval of the 1960's, 1968 stands out as perhaps the most turbulent and violent year of all. Soaring casualities in Vietnam, the assassinations of King and Kennedy, urban riots against racism and poverty, student strikes and takeovers at universities, even bra-burning protests against Miss America: As Americans lurched from crisis to crisis, it seemed that no institution, no tradition was safe and that the nation itself was coming apart at the seams - in many cases, with live TV coverage. In the tradition of centuries, artists used their art as a vehicle to expose and protest against the social and political conditions of their time. This Learning Community uses 1968 as the focal point for examining the ways inwhich art, politics, and society can interact and influence one another. Drawing on art works and magazines, film, music, and both fiction and nonfiction readings from the period, students will explore the ways in which the arts of 1968 both reflected and supported the social and political activism of the 1962's. Joint field trips and guest lectures are planned.

3 credits

Corequisites

ENG 120N

ART 196 Baroque and Rococo Art

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 196A Art as a Vehicle of Social Commentary and Political Protest

Course Description: Political art has entered into mainstream discourse as an integral part of a new, more theoretically grounded and socially contextualized historical practice. In this Learning Community, students will examine selected works of contemporary art conceived as social commentary and/or political protest. Class discussions will focus on the political relevance of current art, for example, Public Art and the controversy surrounding the World Trade Center memorial, Feminist Art, and media Technology and its uses as an interactive vehicle to advance social change.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, PLV: Fall.

3 credits

ART 196C Visual Thinking: Incorporating Art into Elementary Education Curriculum

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I.

Revised Course Description: This course will provide all the skills necessary to plan and implement an art program within an elementary school classroom. This course will link Math, Social Science, Science, and/or literacy with art projects, incorporating a visual thinking process within the curriculum. There will be a service learning component which will involve preparing specific assignments in collaboration with a school, after-school or weekend program for children, the minimum hours for this is one hour per week.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 196D Topic: Visual Studies: Hip Hop in Contemporary Art and Design

Course Description: Hip hop is everywhere, shaping the style and subject matter of today's visual culture, from magazines, clothing and design, to the art world itself, as seen in galleries and museums. But what is it? How can it be defined? A culture is defined by both its roots and by its present use. Many of the elements of the culture can be easily traced back to its home in The Bronx in the early 70's. Its impact on our visual culture is both a reflection of the growing influence of Afro-American aesthestics, as well as the dominance of pop culture. Hip hop elements can be seen in the paintings of Jean Michael Basquiat, through contemporary artists such as Barry McGee, Christian Marclay and Kahinde Wiley. Beneath the obvious stylistic differences between these artists are concepts of hip hop practice which permeate today's visual culture. This impact of hip hop reflects an important shift in the changing values in America.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

ART 196E Picturing Art in Film and Video

Course Description: The art of cinema can also be the cinema of art, that is, movies made about art and artists. This course focuses on the last fifty years of American art seen through films and videos produced up to the present time. Analysis of the a wide range of filmic approaches contrasts biographical dramas such as Pollock and Basquiat with classic documentaries such as Painters Painting, experimental narratives like Downtown 81 (with Jean-Michel Basquiat), or hybrid documentaries such as Charlie Ahearn's Artist Portrait Videos. The primary focus is the evolution of art and artist's studio practice.

3 credits

ART 196F Topic: Mixed Media

Course Description: The studio will be executed in a wide range of media. In class we will make collages and assemblages. We will use acrylic paint, watercolor, ink, pastel, graphite, and charcoal, over many surfaces (sandpaper, maps, newspapers, Mylar, etc.). We will also use different mark-making tools, such as twigs, straws, string, and so on, as well as work with clay and paper mache. For homework you are free to interpret assignments digitally, photographically; using sound, performance, found objects, installation, or any other form that you feel might address the issues raised by your readings.

3 credits

ART 196G Topic: From Cereal Box to Camera Phone

Course Description: Early photographic practices and theories are not terribly different from today's digital imaging, if looked at in the right context. This class will address these similarities, and cover many of the photographic techniques used since photography's invention. Topics will include the history of photography, hands-on work with pinhole cameras, large format cameras, scanners, digital cameras, and camera phones. We will also visit galleries and museums to view examples of work related to course discussions.

3 credits

ART 196H Seminar: Re-Painting history: Lessons From Leonardi Da Vinci

Course Description: Combining art history and studio practice, students will study the work of Italian Renaissance artists, including Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo, and then go into the studio and apply the principles they have learned to a work of art they create. Understanding artistic concepts will be stressed, as opposed to mastering artistic techniques; an open mind is required, although artistic ability is not. This course includes a guided visit to the Italian Renaissance galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

3 credits

ART 196J Digital Photography I

Course Description:Digital Photography I is a studio art course designed to introduce students to the use of the digital camera and to photography as a visual means of expression. Emphasis is on the expression of ideas through learning digital techniques, camera control and output options.

Course Rotatioin: NY:Fall

3 credits

ART 196K Topic: Principles and Techniques of Digitial Photography

Course Description:The major goal of this course is to familiarize students with current digital photography techniques and equipment. By using a hands-on and laboratory/lecture approach, we will be able to produce a wide variety of projects using both studio and field procedures. Some of the areas we will cover include: composition, lighting, focus, content based story-telling, digital printing, and adobe Photoshop post production.
Course Rotation:Spring;PLV

3 credits

ART 196L Topic: Art of Social and Political Protest - Learning Community

Course Description: Within the social and political upheaval of the 1960's, 1968 stands out as perhaps the most turbulent and violent year of all. Soaring casualties in Vietnam, the assassinations of King and Kennedy, urban riots against racism and poverty, student strikes and takeovers at universities, even bra-burning protests against Miss America: as Americans lurched from crisis to crisis, it seemed that no institution, no tradition was safe and that the nation itself was coming apart at the seams-in many cases, with live TV coverage. In the tradition of centuries, artists used their art as a vehicle to expose and protest against the social and political conditions of their time. this Learning Community uses 1968 as the focal point for examining the ways in which art, politics, and society can interact and influence one another. Drawing on art works and magazines, film, music, and both fiction and nonfiction readings from the period, students will explore the way in which the arts of 1968 both reflected and supported the social and political activism of the 1960's. Joint field trips and guest lectures are planned.

3 credits

Corequisites

ENG 120L