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BIO 101 General Biology I

Prerequisite: College Preparatory Mathematics. Co-requisite: CHE 111.

Foundation Course. 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week. For Biology Majors and students in the Clinical Laboratory Science and Allied Health tracks. For New York City sections only, students must register for one of the BIO 101A discussion sections.

Course Description: This is the first half of a one-year course designed to give the science major an understanding of general biological principles. Topics include: cell structure and function, mitosis, meiosis, molecular processes in cells (enzyme functions, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA structure protein synthesis) and basic concepts of development, and genetics. Students are required to attend all departmental seminars.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

(MAT 103 Minimum Grade of C- or MAT 130 Minimum Grade of C- or MAT 131 Minimum Grade of C-) or Math Placement 40 or Math Placement 50

Corequisites

CHE 111

BIO 101 General Biology I

Prerequisite: College Preparatory Mathematics.

Foundation Course. 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week. For Biology Majors and students in the Clinical Laboratory Science and Allied Health tracks. For New York City sections only, students must register for one of the BIO 101A discussion sections.

Course Description: This is the first half of a one-year course designed to give the science major an understanding of general biological principles. Topics include: cell structure and function, mitosis, meiosis, molecular processes in cells (enzyme functions, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA structure protein synthesis) and basic concepts of development, and genetics. Students are required to attend all departmental seminars.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

(MAT 103 Minimum Grade of C- or MAT 130 Minimum Grade of C- or MAT 131 Minimum Grade of C-) or Math Placement 40 or Math Placement 50

Corequisites

CHE 111

BIO 101A Biology Discussion Group

Prerequisite: Students must register for one BIO 101 lecture and for one BIO 101 lab section. 1 hour per week.

Course Description: Small group, peer-facilitated workshops reinforce concepts presented in BIO 101 lecture and focus on learning strategies and problem solving skills.

Course Rotation: TBA.

0 credits

BIO 102 General Biology II

Course Description: (3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours per week. Foundation Course). This continuation of BIO 101 surveys the five kingdoms, highlighting major phyla of biota. Mechanisms for maintaining individual and species homeostasis in plants and animals, including physiological, behavioral, and reproductive strategies will be examined. Students will also be introduced to basic concepts of evolutionary biology, ecology, and population biology. Students must also attend department seminars.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

BIO 101 Minimum Grade of C-

BIO 102 General Biology II

Course Description: (3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours per week. Foundation Course). This continuation of BIO 101 surveys the five kingdoms, highlighting major phyla of biota. Mechanisms for maintaining individual and species homeostasis in plants and animals, including physiological, behavioral, and reproductive strategies will be examined. Students will also be introduced to basic concepts of evolutionary biology, ecology, and population biology. Students must also attend department seminars.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

BIO 101 Minimum Grade of C-

BIO 103 The Biology of Sexual Reproduction

Course Description: In this course, we will explore the biological basis for sexual reproduction with a focus on human reproduction. We will discuss reproductive issues of social and societal importance including hormonal birth control, stem cells, and infertility, as well as environmental impacts on reproduction and fetal origins of adult disease.

Course Rotation:Fall

3 credits

BIO 110 The Biological World

Not open to Biology majors.
Course Description: This course presents and illustrates the main principles of organization, function, perpetuation, and evolution of living forms.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

0 - 3 credits

BIO 113 Heredity, Genes and Society

Not open to Biology majors. 3 lecture hours per week. New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: A discussion of the fundamental principles of human genetics. Mendelian inheritance, mutations, effects of radiations, linkage, crossing-over, the Hardy-Weinberg Law, and heredity-environmental interaction. Discussion of the problems facing society brought about by advances in genetics.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

BIO 114 Evolution

Course Description: Survey of the evidence for the process and mechanism of evolution. Not open to biology majors.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

BIO 115 Human Sexuality

Fulfills 3 credits toward Women's and Gender Studies Minor. Not open to Biology Majors.

Course Description: This course provides a balance of biological and behavioral aspects of human sexuality using a multidisciplinary approach. Anatomical and physiological correlates, STDs and the human immune system, and pregnancy/conception/developmental issues will be highlighted.

Course Rotation: PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

BIO 115P Human Sexuality

Learning Community Course Description: This Learning Community provides a balance of biological and behavioral aspects of human sexuality using a multidisciplinary approach. Anatomical and physiological correlates, STDs and the human immune defense system, and pregnancy/conception/developmental issues will be highlighted. Goals of the Learning Community include familiarizing students with major findings and theoretical perspectives, and to understand how these ideas can be applied in order to understand a variety of social situations.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

Prerequisites

PSY 311P Min Grade D

BIO 117 Human Biology and Disease

Not open to Biology majors. 3 lecture hours per week.

Course Description: A survey of the causes, symptoms, and history of infection, nutritional and genetic diseases in humans, and their importance in society. Includes basic information concerning the anatomy and physiology of the human body.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

BIO 119 Biology of Human Development

Prerequisite: Not open to Biology majors.

Course Description: The course deals with the biological development and changes that take place from the time of conception to the birth of the new individual. It also includes consideration of the social implications of techniques such as karyotyping, amniocentesis, in vitro fertilization and the preservation of human embryos by freezing.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

BIO 121H The Biology of Everyday Life: Living in Your Environment

Course Description: An introduction to various biological concepts through applications to common activities and current issues. In this course, topics include air quality, water resource, land use and environmental sustainability.

Course Rotation: TBA.

0 - 3 credits

BIO 123 Biology and Contemporary Society

Not open to Biology majors. 2 lecture hours and 2 laboratory hours per week.

Course Description: This course emphasizes the interdependence of biological systems to each other and to the environment in general. Discussions include topics such as evolution, plant and animal classification and structure, and concepts of bioethics. Students will be expected to discuss specific issues that impact biological systems, including humans.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

BIO 125 Biological Aspects of Nutrition

Not open to Biology majors. 3 lecture hours per week.

Course Description: A study of the role nutrition plays in biological systems, microorganisms, plants, and animals. The structure and function of related organs and cellular organelles will be emphasized as well as the relationship between nutrient utilization and the physiological activities of the entire organism.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

BIO 127 Microbes in our lives-Friend or Foe?

Course Description: This survey course introduces topical aspects of microbiology and examines the ubiquitous microbial world and its challenging impact on human life throughout history. The principles of microbial diversity, disease and prevention, antibiotic resistance, vaccination, biological warfare and global public health issues are explored. Current issues where microbes play a central role provide this basis for discussion.

Course Rotation: PLV, Spring

3 credits

BIO 152 Anatomy and Physiology I

Only open to Nursing students. 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week.

Course Description: This is the first half of a two-semester course in the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is given to the cell as the basic structural and functional unit of the body and the organization of cells into tissues and organ systems. Organ systems include the skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, respiratory, blood vascular, lymphatic, urogenital, and endocrine.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

CHE 113 Minimum Grade of C

Corequisites

CHE 113

BIO 152 Anatomy and Physiology I

Pre or Co-requisite: CHE 101 or CHE 103.

Only open to Nursing students. 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week.

Course Description: This is the first half of a two-semester course in the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is given to the cell as the basic structural and functional unit of the body and the organization of cells into tissues and organ systems. Organ systems include the skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, respiratory, blood vascular, lymphatic, urogenital, and endocrine.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring, and Summer.

4 credits

Prerequisites

CHE 101 Minimum Grade of C or CHE 103 Minimum Grade of C

BIO 153 Anatomy and Physiology II

Open only to Nursing students. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours per week.

Course Description: This is the second half of a two-semester course in the structure and function of the human body. Organ systems include digestive, respiratory, blood, vascular, lymphatic, urogenital, endocrine, and reproductive.

Course rotation: Fall, Spring, Summer

4 credits

Prerequisites

BIO 152 Minimum Grade of C

BIO 153 Anatomy and Physiology II

Open only to Nursing students. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours per week.

Course Description: This is the second half of a two-semester course in the structure and function of the human body. Organ systems include digestive, respiratory, blood, vascular, lymphatic, urogenital, endocrine, and reproductive.

Course rotation: Fall, Spring, Summer

4 credits

Prerequisites

BIO 152 Minimum Grade of C

BIO 165 Introduction to the Microbiology of Foods

Not open to Biology majors. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours per week.

Course Description: An introductory course in microbiology with emphasis on the role of microorganisms in nature and in foods. Topics covered include food spoilage, food preservation, and food poisoning. The laboratory is designed to reinforce topics covered in the lecture. Not for biology major credit.

Course rotation: NYC: TBA

0 - 3 credits

BIO 170 Spaceship Earth: Issues of Sustainability

Not open to Biology majors. 3 lecture hours per week.

Course Description: This course examines the environmental issues shaping national and international agendas. The study of environmental problems will analyze issues of sustainability by examining the interdependence of biological, sociological, cultural, economic, and political aspects of conservation biology. Students evaluate environmental problems and use collaborative learning to explore creative solutions.

Course Rotation: PLV: TBA.

3 credits

BIO 199B Environmental Biology

Not open to Biology majors.

Course Description: This course presents an overview of environmental issues from a biological perspective. The effects of air, water and ground pollution on the biosphere will be discussed as will current issues related to diversity, such as global climate change.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

BIO 199C Topic: Comparative Biology of Cells

Course Description: This course will provide a discussion of the comparative biology of cell types from invertebrates to vertebrates.

3 credits

BIO 199D Topic: Science, Nature and Technology: The Influence of the Renaissance on the Modern Era

Course Description: This course covers the History of Science from the Reniassance to the Modern Era and counts as a lab science requirement of the core.

3 credits

BIO 199L Topics in Biology: Toxicology - The Science of Poisons

Course Description: This course presents an overview of the study of how chemicals affect the human body. It reviews the history of the field from ancient times when poisons were used to change the leadership of empires, to modern times when they have been used in clandestine operations. Some basic concepts related to poisons are studied, such as the premise that the "ose makes the poison" and that all chemicals are toxic depending upon the extent of exposure. Students are introduced to major classes of toxic materials. Other topics include poisons in natural food and in the natural world, how chemical exposure is reulated by governmental laws, and indoor chemicals that can affect health.

3 credits