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CRJ 240 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Course Description: A study of selected criminal justice systems, organization, theory, and structure in other countries, comparing these to the U.S.A.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CRJ 240 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 240 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Course Description: A study of selected criminal justice systems, organization, theory, and structure in other countries, comparing these to the U.S.A.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CRJ 240 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 242 Crime and Public Policy

Course Description: This course is a comprehensive examination of the causes of crime and its solutions. The first part of the course explores and critiques criminological theories from a variety of perspectives. In the latter part of the course, we study and critique a wide range of public policies designed to prevent and combat crime.

Course Rotation: Fall and Summer.

3 credits

CRJ 243 Alcohol, Drugs and Crime

Course Description: This course is designed to offer insight into society's reliance and dependence on alcohol and legal and illegal drugs. Discussions focus on the economic impact of substance use and abuse, and the history of various criminal justice responses in its "war on drugs." Emphasis will be placed upon the shifting focus for dealing with alcohol and drugs to non criminal justice disciplines.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 243 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 243 Alcohol, Drugs and Crime

Course Description: This course is designed to offer insight into society's reliance and dependence on alcohol and legal and illegal drugs. Discussions focus on the economic impact of substance use and abuse, and the history of various criminal justice responses in its "war on drugs." Emphasis will be placed upon the shifting focus for dealing with alcohol and drugs to non criminal justice disciplines.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 243 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 245 Organized Crime

Course Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a definition and examination of organized crime (both traditional and non-traditional groups). Subjects include the types of crimes engaged in by organized groups; its impact upon society; laws designed specifically to control organized crime; and law enforcement techniques used in combating criminal activity.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CRJ 240 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 247 Introduction to Private Security

Course Description: This course provides background of security, how to secure the exterior of a complex from intruders and eliminate theft, and examines the security function in business and industry as it relates to loss prevention. Discussions will also focus on the community policing strategy known as Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED).

3 credits

CRJ 249 Law and Society

Course Descriptions: Law and society refers broadly to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of law which examines law and legal institutions sociologically and through the lenses of various models of jurisprudence and legal reasoning. Now more than ever we must understand the ways in which law invades and impacts all aspects of our lives, examine the social-historical context of important legal decisions, and how political, economic, and social factors influence law. Law is also now the battle ground on which contemporary culture wars are fought, for example, gay marriage and the war on terror's infringement on civil liberties. We will ask how the law on the books compares with the law in action, applying a critical perspective to understand the relations between law and politics, the criminal justice system, the economy, stratification, culture, ideology, legal education, and social change. Topics we will cover include civil rights, the right to privacy, reproductive issues, sexuality, the civil liability explosion, the death penalty.

3 credits

CRJ 250 Community Relations in the Criminal Justice System

Course Description: Students will examine the complexity of human relations as it affects the interactions of the criminal justice system within the communities, including police, prosecution, defense, judges, and probation and parole. Civil rights and liberties, as well as discrimination and prejudice, will be examined as factors in a changing society.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 250 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 250 Community Relations in the Criminal Justice System

Course Description: Students will examine the complexity of human relations as it affects the interactions of the criminal justice system within the communities, including police, prosecution, defense, judges, and probation and parole. Civil rights and liberties, as well as discrimination and prejudice, will be examined as factors in a changing society.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 250 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 251 Penology

Course Description: An analysis of the penology and reform systems and institutions. A survey of theories and practices regarding offenders including the role of probation and parole.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

CRJ 251 Penology

Course Description: An analysis of the penology and reform systems and institutions. A survey of theories and practices regarding offenders including the role of probation and parole.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall. PLV: Spring.

3 credits

CRJ 252 Probation and Parole

Course Description: A survey of origins, theories and practice involved in pre-sentence investigation and recommendations concerning convicted offenders. Supervision of non-institutionalized offenders, and pre-release investigation, counseling and supervision of those afforded early release from correctional facilities.

3 credits

CRJ 255 Structure and Function of Police Organization

Course Description: Analysis of the role of police in the criminal justice system and an examination of fundamental principles in organization and administration as they relate to departmental structure of a typical urban police agency.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 255 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 255 Structure and Function of Police Organization

Course Description: Analysis of the role of police in the criminal justice system and an examination of fundamental principles in organization and administration as they relate to departmental structure of a typical urban police agency.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for CRJ 255 ( Course : CRJ 150 . Minimum Grade of D. )

CRJ 261 Introduction to Criminal Investigation

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Inquiry and Exploration.

Course Description: An introduction to the techniques of investigation, theories of investigation, collection and preservation of evidence, utilization of laboratory analysis of evidence, interviews, admissions, confessions, and searches.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

CRJ 275 Principals of Emergency Management

Course Description: This course focuses on the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of the emergency management professions and the principles that define effective practice. The starting points are current definitions of emergency management, the missions and visions of the profession, and "The Principles of Emergency Management" developed by the Emergency Management Roundtable in 2007. The objective is to stimulate discussions of the core values that underlie emergency management practice and that essential element in emergency management professional education. Case studies, exercise, and discussions will be used to encourage critical review of the philosophy and principles of emergency management.

Course Rotation: Fall, Spring

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150 Minimum Grade of D

CRJ 296 Topics in Criminal Justice

Course Description: This course gives the students who have completed introductory courses an opportunity to examine special problems with topics of current interest in the Criminal Justice field, such as victimology, research prospecitives, and ethics in law enforcement.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

CRJ 296A Topic: Crime and Public Policy

Course Description: This course offers an analysis of the nature and definition of crime as a particular form of deviance, types of criminal behavior, and the institutions of the legal system. It focuses on the study of crime and why people commit crimes. To fully appreciate why a person commits a crime requires a multi-disciplinary focus, with an emphasis on social policy implementation.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150

CRJ 296C Topic: Homeland Security Strategies

Course Description: This course is organized around an evolving narrative about what homeland security is/might be. Homeland security is an emerging academic discipline that focuses on a national effort to secure the nation. It requires critical thinking about and working to manage a collection of complex problems. Homeland security problems include intentional (war, terrorism, crime), natural (hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, etc.), and accidental (industrial, transportation and other) events.

3 credits

Prerequisites

CRJ 150 Min Grade C-

CRJ 296H Topic: Controversial Criminal Cases

Prerequisite: None. Fulfills 3 credits in Inquiry and Exploration.

Course Description: This course will explore several controversial criminal cases, such as the JFK assassination and the Michael Jackson case. The objective is to recreate, analyze, and hypothesize, based upon the information available. To be successful at this, students must be objective and review the facts critically.

3 credits

CRJ 296K Topic: Sociology of Violence

Course Description: This course give the students who have completed introductory courses an opportunity to examine special problems with topics of current interest in the Criminal Justice field, such as victimology, research perspectives, and ethics in law enforcement.

3 credits

CRJ 296N Topic: Creative Crime Control

Course Description: There are many roads that can lead to a safer society. This class will explore a wide variety of public policies and programs including crime prevention through environmental design, public health campaigns, civil enforcement, broken windows theory, preventing repeat victimization and focused deterrence.

3 credits

CRJ 296P Topic: Restorative Justice

Course Description: This course will examine the historical development of this social justice movement including its roots in religious and faith communities and the cultures of many first-world peoples. The differences between mainstream criminal justice responses to crime and restorative justice approaches will be examined in depth. Students will also learn about specific restorative justice practices and programs currently in operation in the United States as well as around the world. Finally, students will consider the social, ethical, practical, and economic benefits of adopting restorative justice approaches as well as the drawbacks and challenges of doing so in our society.

3 credits

CRJ 296Q Topic: Crime and Public Policy

Course Description: This course will provide a broad understanding of the development of public policy as it relates to disorder and crime. Included in the discussions will be an overview of theories of crime causation, zero tolerance strategies and its impact on the quality of life for citizens.

3 credits

CRJ 296R Topic: Juvenile Justice

Course Description: This course will analyze all aspects of the juvenile justice system and trace its history. Special attention will be paid to the due process revolution, the merits of diversion and community based alternatives to incarceration, the significance of adolescent developmental differences, and trying juveniles as adults.

3 credits

CRJ 296T Topic: The Criminal Justice System and the Victim

Course Description: This course will examine the role of the victim in the criminal justice system, including their rights and what roles are appropriate for them in our system of justice. It will also address how legislatures and governmental agencies have, or have not addressed the needs of victims.

3 credits

CRJ 296V Topic: The Prisoner as Citizen: Civil Rights Behind Bars

Course Description: The way a country treats its prisoners tells us a lot about that country and their commitment to protecting all citizens' civil rights and basic human rights. Reading will examine the dramatic historical evolution of the legal treatment of prisoner's in the US; how courts have applied the Bill of Rights on different issues central to prison life. Discussions will also focus on the treatment of political prisoners and prisoners around the world.

3 credits

CRJ 296W Image-Making in the Age of Terror: Exploring First and Fourth Amendment Rights

Course Description: This class will explore the use of personal, commercial and governmental images- photographs, digital images, cell phone pictures, videos – from a legalistic perspective. We will examine both the ways in which images can be used to expose human rights violations (i.e. the photos of Abu Ghraib atrocities and war photography) and governmental surveillance of civilian populations. We will debase the justification and effectiveness of the government’s increased use of surveillance as a tactic in the war on terror and crime fighting. At the same time, we will explore how political activists and members of the indie media are increasingly turning their cameras and cell phones on the police at political rallies to protect against and/or document abuses of power. We will contrast the legal limitations placed on individual image makers (e.g. Ordinances requiring special permits for street photographers or people suspected of terrorism for taking pictures of landmarks) with the proliferation of surveillance cameras in both privates and public spaces. Given the widespread use of and increased public tolerance for governmental surveillance, we will also explore the true meaning of privacy in the U.S. and its implications. Finally, we will also explore the ways in which personal forms of image-making – especially through the use of the Internet – represents a democratization of the media and offer the possibility of "speaking truth" to governmental and corporate power.

3 credits

CRJ 298 Contemporary Perspectives on Violence

Course Description: Examines violence from a wide range of theoretical perspectives and the causes, consequences and solutions to various forms of violence.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits