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ENV 100 Water, Wildlife and Windmills - An Introduction to Environmental Studies and Sciences

Course Description:
This is the gateway for majors in Environmental Studies and Science. This course is designed around three problem-based learning modules, using focused questions to teach students the relationship between science and policy. The specific questions will be related to three basic topics resources (water), biodiversity (wildlife) and sustainable energy (windmills.). Possible questions include: Is it safe to drink your tap water? Do we want to live with bears? How many windmills make sense (and where)?
Course Rotation: NY, PLV: Fall

3 credits

ENV 105 Social Responsibility and the World of Nature

Course Description: This course considers the idea of citizenship in relation to obligations to nature through a multidisciplinary examination of primary texts from economics, environmentalist studies, philosophical ethics, political economy, and social ecology. Direct student participation in the workings of local government will provide the community-based component and encourage leadership skills through active engagement on Community Board and Town Council environmental committees (environmental committees include land use, preservation, etc.). While in-class reports and a journal focus on the relationship between the more theoretical course readings and the civic experience serve to integrate learning and service.

Course Rotation: NY, PLV Fall and Spring.

3 credits

ENV 110 Nature and Culture: A Study in Connections

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines prominent worldviews that have guided human action toward the natural world. By reading the influential environmental writings of philosophers, economists, environmentalists, theologians, political science, biologists, and naturalists we analyze the interactions between human and natural phenomena, the impact human actions have on the natural world, and the ways nature affects change in civilization. The primary goal of the course is to provide students an opportunity to see how global and interdisciplinary views of nature influence human choices and offer alternative courses of action toward viable solutions that are subject to an ethical analysis.

Course Rotation:Fall and Spring

3 credits

ENV 110C Nature and Culture: A Study in Connections - CAP

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: This course examines prominent worldviews that have guided human action toward the natural world. By reading the influential environmental writings of philosophers, economists, environmentalists, theologians, political science, biologists, and naturalists we analyze the interactions between human and natural phenomena, the impact human actions have on the natural world, and the ways nature affects change in civilization. The primary goal of the course is to provide students an opportunity to see how global and interdisciplinary views of nature influence human choices and offer alternative courses of action toward viable solutions that are subject to an ethical analysis.

Course Rotation:Fall and Spring

3 credits

ENV 111 Environmental Studies: Economical, Ethical and Political Perspectives

Required course for Environmental Studies majors.

Course Description: This interdisciplinary course will concentrate on the interdependence between nature and culture, integrating the economic, political and philosophical issues involved in environmental problems. General topics in value assessment and application to public policy are studied from a problem-oriented approach.

Course Rotation: Fall.

3 credits

ENV 111 Environmental Studies: Economic, Ethical and Political Perspectives

Course Description: This interdisciplinary course will concentrate on the interdependence between nature and culture, integrating the economic, political and philosophical issues involved in environmental problems. General topics in value assessment and application to public policy are studied from a problem-oriented approach.

Course Rotation: NYC and PLV: Fall

3 credits

ENV 112 Environmental Studies - Basic Issues

Course Description: As in ENV 111, the relationship between nature and human culture will serve as a backdrop for the course. From the perspectives of economics, philosophical ethics and political science, this course critically examines central topics in the environment. Air and water pollution, population, deforestation, biodiversity, global warming, resource use, renewable and nonrenewable energy are considered from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Course Rotation: NYC and PLV: Spring.

3 credits

ENV 112 Environmental Studies- Basic Issues

Course Description: As in ENV 111, the relationship between nature and human culture will serve as a backdrop for the course. From the perspectives of economics, philosophical ethics and political science, this course critically examines central topics in the environment. Air and water pollution, population, deforestation, biodiversity, global warming, resource use, renewable and nonrenewable energy are considered from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Course Rotation: Spring.

3 credits

ENV 130 The Naturalists

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with aesthetic insight into the natural world through the creative and imaginative writings and observations of famous naturalists. Significant time will be spent studying aesthetic categories has influenced the conceptual profile and strategies of the environmental movement in the West. Classroom discussions and experimental field studies will blend theory with first hand experiences. Investigation of the perception and reality of "our place" in the world of nature and how aesthetic responses and art has influenced that perception over the years provide the enduring theme for the course.

Course Rotation: Spring

3 credits

ENV 140 Act Locally: Environmental Issues and you

Course Description:The course introduces students to the maxim "Think globally, act locally" originated by renowned scientist and naturalist Rene Dubos. Based on this philosophy students will be enlightened about global environmental issues from the perspective of an uninformed citizen. Correlations will be made between humans and their interrelationships to the natural world by examining social, economic and environmental influences. As part of a community service component students will be engaged in team projects that will provide educational programs to the Pace community during Earth Month.

Course Rotation: PLV Spring

3 credits

ENV 172 Introduction to World Regional Geography

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in World Traditions and Cultures (Area of Knowledge III).

3 credits