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POL 101 Politics: Comparative Introduction

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: An introduction to politics using comparative analysis of countries. Executive, judicial, legislative, socialization, public opinion, media, decision making and power will be among the functions in a political system that are considered.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall - Odd years.

3 credits

POL 101C Politics: Comparative Introduction (CAP)

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: How humans develop attitudes towards power. The roles of family, peers, church, mass media, interest groups, parties, psychic tension, and cultural myths in shaping political beliefs and action. United States patterns are compared with political conditioning and behavior in other countries, including democracies and other regimes.

3 credits

POL 102 Public Myth and Ideologies

Course Description: Major systems of symbol and rationale which give cultures their distinctive political imagery. Nationalism, capitalism, socialism, communism, agrarianism, modernization, conservatism, liberalism, and anarchism. How these idea systems affect the general population, groups, elites, and leaders.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall - Even years.

3 credits

POL 102C Public Myth and Ideologies: We Protest: Dissent & Democracy

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II.

Learning Community: Course Description: Major systems of symbol and rationale which give cultures their distinctive political imagery. Nationalism, capitalism, socialism, communism, agrarianism, modernization, conservatism, liberalism, and anarchism. How these idea systems affect the general population, groups, elites, and leaders.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring. PLV: Fall - Even years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

ENG 110 Minimum Grade of D and ENG 120 Minimum Grade of D

POL 108 Political Theory Comparative Introduction

Course Description: Panoramic survey of teachings and prescriptions about power, rule, government, and public affairs in Western, Confucian, Japanese, Islamic, Hindu, Slavic-Orthodox, Latin American, African civilizations applies systematic comparative analysis to explicate and contrast their norms concerning state, rule of law, accountability, liberty, legitimate coercion.

Course Rotation:Spring

3 credits

POL 110 Leadership and Advocacy

Course Description: This course will explore organizing and leadership through a combination of readings, "real world" community work and online discussions. Students will undertake grassroots mobilization work as well as develop organizing skills that influence the community and strengthen leadership skills. An interest in organizing, empowerment, policy, government and/or improving civic life is strongly recommended for individuals enrolled in this online course. Students will participate in community-based work with advocacy organizations in their own communities during the semester.

Course Rotation: NY and PL: Spring and Summer.

3 credits

POL 111 American Government and Political Institutions

Course Description: A basic course in American government which explores the theoretical and philosophical background of the Constitution and the creation and development of the three branches of national government: executive, judicial, and legislative. The course also explores the nature of linkage institutions in the American political system, including political parties, interest groups, the media and campaigns and elections.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring - Odd years, and Summer. PLV: Fall.

3 credits

POL 111A American Government & Political Institutions - Liberty, Equality, & American Life Learning Community

Course Description:This Learning Community will explore American history, politics, and identity, using the themes of liberty and equality as central to the American political tradition. The Political Science class will focus on various aspects of American life, including: The Road, New Orleans, Success and the American Dream, The Gilded Age and the Civil Rights Era, and Dissent in American Politics. The History class will use simulations involving the Reacting to the Past methodology to recreate the circumstances of women and labor in 1910s New York City and the debates within the Civil Rights Movements in the 1960s, as well as the history of dissent in America to the present.

3 credits

Corequisites

HIS 113HA

POL 111C American Government and Political Institutions - CAP

A basic course in American government which explores the practical and theoretical background of the Constitution, examines the nature of government under the Constitution, focusing on the three branches: executive, judicial, and legislative, explores how government actually operates, and seeks to explain the workings of the American political process.

3 credits

POL 114 Introduction to International Relations

Course Description: In this course, we will explore power relationships between the major political entities in the world, including both nation-states and non-state actors. We will explore how major schools of thought interpret how the world works. Topics we will discuss among others include the processes of globalization, global and regional security, terrorism, global environmental crises, transnational social movements, war, peacemaking/keeping, trade, diplomacy, colonialism, and human rights. Particular attention will be paid to the United Nations, the effect of systems/institutions on real people, and the phenomena of civil society producing changes in a global context. Anyone who expects to be working in a global context should consider taking this course.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

POL 118 State and Local Government

Course Description: A study of state and local government within the context of the Constitutional structure in the United States. Courses in New York City focus on the functions of the mayor's office of New York and the City Council; courses on the Pleasantville campus emphasize the nature of state and local government within the context of the metropolitan area.

Course Rotation: PLV: Spring.

3 credits

POL 196B Topic in Political Science: Leadership and Advocacy

Course Description: This course will explore organizing and leadership through a combination of readings, "real world" community work and online discussions. Students will undertake grassroots mobilization work, as well as develop organizing skills that influence the community and strengthen leadership skills. An interest in organizing, empowerment, policy, government and/or improving civic life is strongly recommended for individuals enrolled in this online course. Students will participate in community-based work with advocacy organizations in their own communities during the semester.

3 credits

POL 196C Topic: Metropolis: Issues in Politics and Governments in the New York Metro Area

Course Description: This course is designed to provide the student with basic knowledge of how governments in the New York metropolitan area decide "who gets what, when and how" (Lasswell 1958). We will examine the general principles of federalism as the process impacts on local and on state governments, as necessary. We will study the sources of power in governments and how such powers influence which policies governments pursue. This course will focus on the roles of economic power, officials, business, and interests groups. We will examine these factors as they relate to specific New York metropolitan-area governments and public policy issues (poverty, taxes, the environment, sprawl, etc.) through in class, student and faculty-driven, discussions and debates.

3 credits