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POL 301 Workshop: Community Politics and Environment

Course Description: Special studies are chosen from a changing list of topics dealing with Political Science, constitutional issues, world affairs, public policy, and political leaders. POL 303A International Organization and POL 303C United Nations Workshop may be repeated once each for credit, as tehse workshops prepare students for various international conferences, simulations and for United Nations models, with different countries assigned for representation and different issues to be addressed each time. No more than 12 credits will be counted toward the major.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

POL 301A Politics Workshop: Leaders and Leadership

Updated Course Description: An exciting look at the present theories of leadership not only in politics but in many ofther fields including business and non-profits organizations will be explored. Problem solving, decision-making and current leadership theories will be analyzed. Cutting-edge practices in transformational leadership for change will be simulated in class. Students will not only analyze leadership, they will develop their skills of leadership leading to enhanced opportunities for personal achievement.

3 credits

POL 301C Politics Workshop: Political Satire and Cartoons

Course Description: Humorists, cartoonists, and commentators around the world are surveyed. Their wit is added to the accumulated body of satire and science fiction to shed light on excess, pomposity, hypocrisy, rabble-rousing, and taste. Weekly surveys of cartoons yield examples for collections on topics such as ethics, apathy, power, authority, influence, force, and manipulation. Students construct a satirical gallery of contemporary heroes and rogues and compile a current manual of archetypal political scenarios, fables, and cautionary tales.

3 credits

POL 301D Workshop: Politics and News

Course Description: This course focuses on the role of information in American political life. The fundamental question is: is it possible for the average citizen to make wise political choices in a complex and contentious world, where elites often manipulate information. In our discussion of the sources and effects of information we will use real-life examples such as the Iraq War. We will explore what Americans know about politics, and examine the various meanings of ¿deliberation¿, and the relationship between deliberation and democracy. We will also address the growing question of the importance of apathy in American political life.

3 credits

POL 301G Workshop: Presidential Leadership

Course Description: Many political scientists have analyzed the character, policies, and achievements of presidents. This course will look primarily at post World War II presidents to determine the rise in presidential decision making power. Are there sufficient checks and balances to oversee this rise? Has Congress, the Courts or the media properly addressed this? Do we have an imperial presidency? If yes, must something be done to insure that democratic institutions limit the use of executive power? Why? How does presidential power impact present national and international issues?

3 credits

POL 301J Workshop: Constitutional Law and Social Change

Course Description: How does law change and evolve? Why do some societies experience gradual social growth, while others violent political revolution? What are the conditions by which groups displaced by legal norms can use legal processes to redefine their legal status? How do legal institutions work under the stress of social pressure? How do abstract normative concepts such as justice, liberty and equality redefine, and are redefined by, the goals of groups and the standards of legal obligation which are afforded to those groups? The course seeks to answer these and other questions.

3 credits

POL 301K Politics Workshop: Politics of Law in American Society

Prerequisite: Satisfies Politics senior seminar.

3 credits

POL 301L Politics Workshop: The Theory and Practice: Community Applied Legislative Advocacy

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge I (Service Learning Component) or fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge III.

Course Description: This is an active legislative advocacy course teaching grassroots campaign work, lobbying, research, and media management through hands-on activities to pass legislation toward lowering the price and improving the safety of prescription drugs in New York State. Experienced-based learning activities will be accompanied by readings, writing assignments, guest lecturers and classroom work and discussion. This course in civic engagement will involve students who will be actively lobbying New York, State officials both elected and appointed.

3 credits

POL 302 Politics Workshop: Road to the White House

Course Description: Special studies are chosen from a changing list of topics dealing with Political Science, constitutional issues, world affairs, public policy, and political leaders. POL 303A International Organization and POL 303C United Nations Workshop may be repeated once each for credit, as tehse workshops prepare students for various international conferences, simulations and for United Nations models, with different countries assigned for representation and different issues to be addressed each time. No more than 12 credits will be counted toward the major.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, Spring, and Summer. PLV: Fall and Spring.

3 credits

POL 302A Politics Workshop: Comparative Government

Course Description: Constitutional and operational institutions and functions for rules-making, rules-applying, and rules-adjudication are studied in parliamentary, presidential, despotic, and disintegrating regimes. What structures and what behaviors are necessary and sufficient for the center to hold in unitary, federal, and confederal arrangements.

3 credits

POL 302B Workshop: Presidents, Prime Ministers, Chief Executives

Course Description: Students compare executive offices and functions according to constitutional and institutional situations in which they are found. Topics include values, structure, and executive power, the executive establishment (ministers, advisors, and surrogates of power as well as physicians and protection), legislative relations, communications, crisis management, and, for national executives, security and foreign policy processes. As a group project, classroom simulation is done of the executive budget process based on procedures used by U.S. state and local governments.

3 credits

POL 302C Workshop: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights

Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 118 or permission of Instructor. Satisfies Politics Senior Seminar. Fulfills 3 credits in Inquiry and Exploration.

Revised Course Description: Equality lies at the heart of American democracy. And yet, the word "equality" has had different meanings at different times, and has been defined in different ways by different individuals and groups. This course focuses on the history of civil rights litigation and the unending search for "equality" on the part of marginalized groups in the United States. Students will learn how to brief cases which is perfect for any student who wants to attend law school.

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Minimum Grade of D or POL 118 Minimum Grade of D

POL 302F Topics: Off-Year Congressional Elections: Their Political and Policy Implications

Course Description: This course is designed to explain the dynamics of off-year congressional (U.S. House and U.S. Senate) elections and how they impact future political and public policy decisions. The course explores the most recent off-year elections and places them in an historical and political context. The course reviews and considers the various theoretical, political and statistical explanations which have been offered to explain off-year electoral outcomes. The course also considers the impact off-year elections have on both the House and Senate, the presidency, and American public policy.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall and Spring, even years .

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Min Grade D

POL 302I Workshop: Freedom and Sustainability in 21st Century: Global Comparison

This course explores the meaning of "sustainable development" in international and comparative politics and law. You will read various definitions and come up with your own interdisciplinary definition and case study based on the theories and perspectives of conservation biology, restoration ecology, international environmental law, trade, and the "triple bottom line" of economic, environmental, and social concerns.

3 credits

POL 302J Workshops: Sustainability and Sovereignity in the 21st Century

Course Description: Analyzes and compares the approaches to sustainable development in the affluent Norht with economic development in the South. What is the interrelationship between sustainable development and such issues as: human rights, economic development, democracy, healthcare. What is the hope for reducing global climate change and making development sustainable?

3 credits

POL 303A Politics Workshop: International Organization

Course Description: Topics about many aspects of International Relations are researched, negotiated and discussed. Simulations of many intergovernmental organizations, particularly the United Nations, are used in the method of instruction. A requirement of this course is participation in at least one of intercollegiate model of international affairs. The usual time for this competition is the weekend before Thanksgiving break. You may take this course twice since topics, countries and non-governmental organizations are always different.

3 credits

POL 303C Politics Workshop: United Nations

Course Description: The purpose of this politics workshop is to understand how intergovernmental systems, especially the United Nations' system, function. The art of diplomacy and policy-making is practiced through the simulation of the behavior of United Nations member states and non-governmental organizations. Students will attain skills in communication, writing, research, public speaking, and negotiation as they relate to international relations and comparative politics. Skills will be practiced at competitive conferences at the local, regional, national, and international levels. Attendance at one intercollegiate conference is mandatory that usually occurs the week before Easter Sunday.

3 credits

POL 303D Workshop: International Issues and Trouble Spots

Course Description: Studies current instances of international disputes in the long-term context of conflict and interdependence. National, regional, religious, ethnic, ideological and economic differences receiving the attention of the international community are examined. Up-to-date developments are analyzed in international structures for managing conflict, including diplomacy, peace-keeping forces, and regional integration. Issues eligible for Security Council consideration are monitored.

3 credits

POL 303E American and Global Community Development: Theory, Policy and Practice

Course Description: What role can and should government play to help address issues in healthcare, housing, education, and human services? The course will examine community development concepts, strategies, programs and projects. Students will review and evaluate U.S. public policy in community development and explore the different roles played by government, business, nonprofit organizations and local communities. The American approach to community development is compared to that of multinational and non-government organizations along with the successful strategies of other nations. The core functions of public service organizations will be explored; organizational structure and management practices; and income performance and financial management.

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Min Grade D or POL 118 Min Grade D

POL 303F Workshop: Freedom in the World

Course Description: This course in postmodern theory will explore what leading theorists are saying about freedom and justice in this technologically complex world. Reading will include, among others, Rawls and Habermas, and will be aimed at illuminating issues in the protection of freedom and democracy.

3 credits

POL 303G 100 Years of Democracy and Citizenship

Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 118 or permission of Instructor.

Course Description: This course explores the ideas and movements of western political thought in the 20th century, including communism, fascism, liberalism, existentialism, feminism, postmodernism, and religious fundamentalism. The course will take students through the major events in the West over the last hundred years, from the onset of the Russian Revolution and World War I, to World War II, to the Cold War, to the "War on Terror."

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Minimum Grade of D or POL 118 Minimum Grade of D

POL 303H Political and Social Entreprenuership

Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 118 or permission of Instructor.

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Min Grade D or POL 118 Min Grade D

POL 303J Workshop: International Environmental Law

Prerequisite: POL 101, or POL 114 or permission of instructor.

Course Description: There is a body of law that pertains to the conduct of nations regarding the environment. Are these laws necessary and sufficient to stem the impact of western-style globalization being expanded through the world. What is the role of international, national, and local entities to create an agenda for the 21st century that makes life possible not only for the present but in the future.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

POL 303K Topics in Political Science: Brazil: Diplomacy and Sustainable Development

b> Course Description: Off Site. This 3 credit travel course will depart on July 23, for Brasila, Brazil. The first component to this trip will be the participation in the 2008 Americas Model UN Conference, where registered students will be able to practice their diplomacy skills with students from around the world in developing global solutions to global problems. The second component to this course is a excursion into the Amazon to witness first hand the development of a super highway through the rain forest. Students will examine the displacement of indigenous people, deforestation, environmental degradation, and will be asked to prepare position papers with policy suggestions for sustainable development. This course can stand alone as a 3 credit summer course, with course work being completed before and after return. Additionally, this course can be combined with fall registration, with the travel and Model UN course work being completed prior to departure and the sustainable development course work being completed during the course of Fall 2008 academic semester.

3 credits

POL 303L Topic in Political Science: Deep Democracy: The Inward Journey and Transforming the World

Course Description: As planet earth becomes an increasingly web linked social network, a global village, with its wonderful potential for increased understanding as well as horrible potential for destructive misunderstanding, exciting debates are emerging across academic disciplines about the meaning of democracy. How does democracy merge as a value in the hearts, minds and actions of persons, groups, and nations? How significant is democracy in the process of creating meaningful paradigmatic change. This conversation has transcended the discipline of political science and has become a vigorous debate in psychology, sociology, philosophy and even theoretical physics. This workshop in Deep Democracy will explore the work of Arthur Mindell and others contemporary thinkers who are challenging democratic thinkers by demanding the implementation of democracy start as a personal transformational process within the individual and the group in which he participates. Understanding the predispositions towards democracy as well as the resistance to sharing its process in our own consciousness is a precursor to creating democratic relationships with others. Proliferating democratic engagements cross-culturally and mediating conflict by deliberative democratic experiences are necessary to reduce dissonance and encourage creative interchange among people. When democratic understanding reaches a critical mass so to speak, transformative shift occurs generating the space and context in which creative possibilities of trans-cultural understanding emerges, shedding light on the path toward formerly unconstruable, more humanly effective institutions.

0 - 3 credits

POL 303M Topics: Migration Politics: From Displacement to Deportation

Course Description: This workshop examines the forced and voluntary migration of people, with an emphasis on how this phenomenon has significantly altered and been shaped by globalization, human rights law, various forms of political activism, and how countries encounter people entering their borders. In line with the research conducted by leading migration studies programs and think tanks around the U.S. and the world, we will focus on three key areas: 1) the factors that contribute to the displacement or "statelessness" of various communities; 2) the political agency of migrants in resisting and shaping policies; 3) the actions and rationale of countries in controlling migrant movements. The subtitle "from displacement to deportation" illustrates an emphasis on the particular vulnerabilities of "forced" migration.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring.

3 credits

POL 325 Conflict Analysis

This is a writing-enhanced course.

Course Description: This class will provide students with a range of analytical tools for understanding armed conflict, including the kinds of actors involved, their motivations, the systems in which they operate. It will examine the ways in which war is changing and contrast a variety of theoretical approaches to conflict, including the human needs approach, political economy, international relations and psychology.

Course Rotation: NY: Spring, even years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 114 Minimum Grade of D

POL 326 Reconciliation and Transitional Justice

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in World Traditions and Cultures (Area of Knowledge III) or 3 credits in Human, Social, and Natural Phenomena (Area of Knowledge V).

Course Description: Questions of reconciliation and justice are at the heart of peacebuilding in divided societies and post-conflict settings. This course exposes students to the complexities of reconciliation processes and helps students think analytically about the challenges that balancing the need for justice and peace in societies which have been devastated by violence. Throughout the course we will explore how societies go about resolving the tension between reconciliation and justice in post-conflict settings.

Course Rotation: NYC: Fall, even years.

3 credits

POL 330 Politics of the Global City

Course Description: This class will explore the historical and contemporary role of global cities in international politics. Though comparative study, it will examine questions of political geography, cosmopolitanism, policing, urban warfare urban planning and the role of the art and culture in metropolitan politics.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring.

3 credits

POL 350 Road to the White House

Course Description: This class will focus on the presidential selection process. We will take an in-depth look at what candidates have to do in order to capture the party nomination, and the role that political parties play in linking voters to the only nationally elected office in the American system of government. We will also examine other important aspects of the process, including the role of the media and interest groups, and the demands of campaign financing. When this semester concludes, you should be able to make informed judgments about the impact of the presidential selection process on the democratic character of the American political system.

Course Rotation: NY, Fall

3 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Minimum Grade of D

POL 380M Politics Through Film

Course Description: The course looks at the nature of politics though its portrayal in film. Attention is paid to the relationship between the individual and society, between human nature and the nature of social and political institutions.

3 credits

POL 391 Politics Internship I

Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 114 or POL 118, junior standing, 3.00 QPA and permission of Instructor.

Course Description: Internships enable students to participate in the daily management and operation of federal, state, county, and local government agencies. Placements are tailored to the particular interests and goals of students.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

4 credits

Prerequisites

POL 111 Minimum Grade of D or POL 114 Minimum Grade of D or POL 118 Minimum Grade of D

POL 392 Politics Internship II

Prerequisite: Junior standing, 3.00 QPA and permission of Instructor.

Course Description: Internships enable students to participate in the daily management and operation of federal, state, county, and local government agencies. Placements are tailored to the particular interests and goals of students.

Course Rotation: Fall and Spring.

4 credits

POL 393 Internship in Government

Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 114 or POL 118, junior standing, 3.00 QPA and permission of the Instructor. This course may be taken as an approved internship in various programs that the department approves.

Course Description A variety of internships at local, state, and national levels of government is available to qualified students. Students supplement the knowledge gained in the classroom setting by the "hands on" experience of program research, planning, and execution in a government agency.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 - 16 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for POL 393 ( Course : POL 111 . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : POL 111A . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : POL 111C . Required Courses: 1. ) or (Course : POLA 111 . Required Courses: 1. )

POL 395 Independent Study in Political Studies/Science

Prerequisite: Junior standing and a minimum CQPA of 3.00, and permission of the Instructor.

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, the departmental chairperson, and the academic dean, students may select a topic for guided research that is not included in the regular course offerings. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or paper must also be submitted.

Course Rotation: TBA.

1 - 9 credits