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300

SOC 301 Popular Culture and Change

Course Description: This course explores how different forms of culture-such as language, clothing, music and religion-are used to circulate ideology and spur social change. We will investigate the evolution of youth subcultures and countercultures, the role of music and clothing in protest and identity formation, the marketing of religious objects as popular culture, and the appropriation of various forms of popular culture by mainstream organizations and corporations. Finally we will discuss whether the possibility of resistance to such cooptation exists, and, if so how such "resistant communities" can be nurtured and preserved.

Course Rotation: NYC:Fall

3 credits

SOC 302 Another World is Possible: Utopian Communities in Thought and Practice

Course Description: This course will provide an overview of utopian theory and practice in the United States, with an emphasis on examining the link between religious and political philosophy and experiments with communal and intentional living. We will examine 19th century communes such as the Oneidas, Shakers and New Harmony, and will also learn about contemporary intentional communities such as Twin Oaks, MOVE, Christiania and the Twelve Tribes. These cases illuminate the challenges of creating "another world," and also allow us to investigate the social factors that influence their success or failure. Readings will include personal memoirs, sociological examinations of both existing and defunct intentional communities, and relevant elements of political, religious and sociological theory.

Course Rotation: TBA

3 credits

SOC 318 Urbanism and Modernism

New Core: Fulfills 3 credits in Area of Knowledge II or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge IV or 3 credits in Area of Knowledge V.

Course Description: A study of how artists, writers, sociologists, and film makers around the world contribute to the construction of modern urban culture. The course explores what the paintings, poems, theories, and films have in common. By examining imported modern and postmodern ideas students gain insights into the makers of modern metropolitan culture. By looking at the processes of modernization and urbanization around the world, they gain a deeper understanding of the social and economic consequences of these processes.

Course Rotation:
NYC: Spring - Even years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

SOC 102 Minimum Grade of D

SOC 323 Social Theories

Course Description: A comparative survey of the history of social theory through an examination of the major thinkers of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Parsons, Mead, and others. A major concern of the course is how theorists ask and answer questions concerning the nature of the social order.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for SOC 323 ( Course : SOC 102 . Minimum Grade of D. )

SOC 380 Social Research Methods

Course Description: An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of social research. Topics will include sampling, survey, case study, interview, and questionnaire preparation. Student investigations using various research methods and class reports are required. Knowledge of statistics is not essential.

Course Rotation: NYC: Spring - Odd years.

3 credits

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite for SOC 380 ( Course : SOC 102 . Minimum Grade of D. )

SOC 390 Internship in Sociology

Prerequisite: 6 credits in Sociology and Anthropology.

Course Description: This course provides Sociology/Anthropology majors and other interested students with work placement in agencies dealing with social concerns. Placement is on an individual basis depending on upon need and availability. Such placements give students a first-hand understanding of important social issues facing society and provide practical skills and methods for addressing social needs.

Course Rotation: TBA.

3 credits

SOC 395 Independent Study in Sociology

Prerequisite: Junior standing and a minimum CQPA of 3.00.

Course Description: With the approval of the appropriate faculty member, the department chairperson, and the academic dean, students may select a topic for guided research that is not included in the regular course offerings. The student meets regularly with the faculty member to review progress. A research project or paper must also be submitted.

Course Rotation: TBA.

1 - 9 credits